The Briefly for November 1, 2018 – The “We Need A New Bushwick We Ruined this One” Edition

Midtown is getting a makeover, Shakespeare in the Park goes dark in 2021, the city bungled their voting information mailer, the NYPD vs a swan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Blue Skies Over Grand Army Plaza

Photos from the Village Halloween parade. (amNY)

Here’s what you need to know about the election on November 6. (Brokelyn)

Is the closing of Bushwick art gallery Signal the canary in a coal mine for the decline of the neighborhood? Signal closes on November 2 after their final show, “No Signal.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Governor Cuomo restored voting rights to most parolees in April, but someone forgot to tell the city’s Board of Elections, who printed the wrong information in the City Voter Guide mailers. (Bklyner)

2 Penn Plaza is about to get a dramatic revamp starting in 2020. Get ready for midtown to look very different. (Curbed)

All 128 NYC restaurants that were awarded Bib Gourmand status in 2019 (two courses and a glass of wine or dessert is under $40). (Eater)

How many NYPD officers does it take to capture a swan? Watch the video and see. (Gothamist)

Get ready for tight security at the NYC Marathon this Sunday. (Queens Gazette)

The newest addition to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade’s balloons is “Little Cloud” from the art duo FriendsWithYou, a happy little optimistic cloud. (NY Times)

The creator of the MetroCard, William Wheeler, swiped his last swipe at 69. He worked for the MTA for 32 years and is one of the reasons we don’t still use tokens. (NY Post)

19 bars and restaurants in Astoria to try. (Eater)

Take a tour and dip into the history of of Red Hook’s Erie Basin. (Forgotten NY)

The new Greenpoint Library will not open in December as scheduled due to discoveries of asbestos and the remains of the original Carnegie Library from 1906. (Bklyner)

Check out every publicly accessible waterfront in the city with the interactive Waterfront Access Map. (Curbed)

Shakespeare in the Park will go dark in 2021 when the Delacourt undergoes a $110 million renovation. The renovation is meant to address issues like how the women’s bathroom is extremely far from the amphitheater, making it ADA compliant, and other needed improvements to the stage and backstage areas. Construction is set to being in 2020 and finish in 2022. (NY Times)

Alan Cumming is tending bar. “Why would you want to have a bar otherwise?”

The elevated trains in New York date back to 1868, when the Eiffel Tower was brand new. The trains moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus. (Curbed)

City Lab attended the L Train Shutdown Nightmare “experience” before it prematurely closed. They were less than impressed.

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