The Briefly for February 5, 2019 – The “Goose-Related Subway Delays” Edition

A possible CBD ban, State Senator Michael Gianaris could end the Amazon HQ2 deal, State of the Union protests, the hardest job in NYC, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Love Lane in Brooklyn Heights

A look at two of the State of the Union protests planned across the city. (amNY)

There were some goose-related delays on the Q train on Monday afternoon. (NY Post)

The 9/11 Memorial & Museum will add a section in May dedicated to people who died or became ill with 9/11-related illnesses. (Curbed)

10x TONY award winning “The Band’s Visit” will end its Broadway run on April 7. (NY Times)

The state saw an unplanned $2.3 billion drop in income tax revenue, which will force the state to curb spending. In some parts of the city, that’s called an “Amazon sized hole.” (NY Post)

New York City’s lack of cash crops ended slavery. In 1790, African Americans accounted for over 30% of Brooklyn’s population and most were enslaved. (Greenpointers)

10 new art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Hope. Love. Utopian. Finding optimism on city streets. (6sqft)

A rundown of the wave of laws that followed new blue wave in the state’s legislature. (NY Times)

A 72-year-old cyclist was killed in a hit-and-run while riding in the bike lane on Eight Avenue at 45th St. It was the second cyclist death in three days. (Gothamist)

The state’s Public Authorities Control Board isn’t well known, but it could kill the Amazon HQ2 deal. The state senate appointed the anti-Amazon Senator Michael Gianaris to sit on the board, of which any of the three members can veto the project. (The Real Deal)

Get your CBD-infused food and drinks now, because the Department of Health may be banning its use as a food additive. (Eater)

Jennifer Irigoyen, 35-year-old real estate agent and fitness instructor, was stabbed to death in her Ridgewood apartment building around 1am on Sunday night. Irigoyen a was five months pregnant and no arrests have been made. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit calls the conditions at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are a “a humanitarian crisis,” according to a lawsuit filed by the Federal Defenders of New York. (Gothamist)

The arguments for and against landmarking the Strand Bookstore. (West View News)

The city is moving to fire the security officer who pulled Jazmine Headley’s 1-year-old son from her arms at a Brooklyn benefits center in December of last year. A second officer has resigned. (NY Post)

Clothing and accessories by cat people for cat people to promote feral cat awareness. Yes, they’re in Bushwick. How’d you know? (Bushwick Daily)

A man with MS-13 affiliations was arrested in connection to the shooting on the 90th St-Elmhurst Avenue 7 train platform. (NY Times)

The City Council is considering a foie gras ban. (Gothamist)

Is Netflix’s “Russian Doll” an allegory for Tompkins Square Park? (Gothamist)

After the first day of deliberations, the jury has not come to a verdict in El Chapo’s trial on day one. (amNY)

A 16-year-old 92nd Street Y camp counselor says she was blacklisted after she accused an older counselor of sexual assault. (NY Post)

If you thought your job was hard, meet Pete Tomlin. As NYC Transit’s new modern signal chief, Tomlin is responsible for modernizing 90% of the subway’s signals. Good luck Pete, you’ll need it. (amNY)

15 restaurants that “feel like Japan.” (Eater)

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