The “The “Do You Know Your Neighborhood Borders?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Pizza worth the wait, Cuomo bargains with Trump, FIT lands in hot water over a fashion show, Morningside Heights’ rezoning, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 56˚
Light rain starting tomorrow morning.

Seven places to discover in Staten Island's Little Sri Lanka, walkable from the Staten Island Ferry. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

P.F. Chang’s is finally coming to NYC, kinda. A takeout, catering and delivery-only version of P.F. Chang's is coming to the Financial District. (Erika Adams for Eater)

How the line for Scarr's Pizza turned around a food critic's view on lines. (Adam Platt for Grub Street)

An appeals court on Thursday upheld a $6.75 million judgement against Jerry Wolkoff, the real estate developer who whitewashed 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo continues to publicly negotiate for the return of New Yorkers to the Trusted Traveler Program, but so far to no avail. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Where is Clinton Hill's eastern border? What number street does the Upper East Side stop being the Upper East Side? Are you in Rego Park or Forest Hills? How well do you know your neighborhood boundaries? Classon Ave, 96th, and you're in Middle Village and need to stop lying to yourself. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: If you've got $46,000 a month to spend on living expenses, you can live in the Plaza's only apartment with a private elevator. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

After criticism for his handling of sexual misconduct allegations against multiple powerful men, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance's office announced a new investigation into claims against the former Columbia University gynecologist Robert Hadden, whose alleged victim list is over 65 women. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The flu continues to brutalize New York City, with over 6,000 confirmed cases. It's still not too late to get a shot, the season ends in May. If you don't want to get a shot, you could move to Staten Island, which has under 200 cases compared to Queens' 1,746. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Farewell Andy Byford. (Ben Yakas and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How many "ghost subway stations" do you know of? Nearly everyone knows about the old City Hall stop, which can be seen if you stay on the 6 train when it turns around, but how about the abandoned and paved over 91st St stop on the 4/5/6? (Sam Neubauer for I Love the Upper West Side)

Congestion pricing is coming in less than a year, maybe. What the hell is the latest with congestion pricing? (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Morningside Heights is headed for a rezoning, but you won't find the usual protests and legal fight surrounding it, as the rezoning has been a community project for a number of years. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Your answer to Friday's question:
Do you support Mayor Bloomberg's run for democratic nominee?
Yes: 18.2% | No: 81.8%

Inside one the the city's rat academies. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

October is gonna be a bad month for flying in the United States. There'll be nothing wrong in the skies, but the airports will be full of people finding out that they aren't allowed to fly with their normal drivers licenses and need a READ ID license instead, and we all know just how rational and calm people are in airports. The Airports Council, a private group that represents commercial airports, is calling on the government to extend the deadline. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Brokers' fees, explained. (Localize Labs)

The Metropolitan Museum Of Art announced its Roof Garden Commission of Lattice Detour, which will "reconsider the panoramic view of the city skyline and the implications of obstruction and permeability within a social space." (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Do you have what it takes to eat (and keep down) the "Monster Hell Ramen" at String Ramen in the East Village? After you sign a waiver, you've got 20 minutes to finish the dish, made with some of the hottest rappers on the planet and modeled after the Buddhist concept of multiple layers of hell, to win $50 and a Monster Hell t-shirt. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Real Estate Porn: The hottest listings in Brooklyn, Iowa. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Sorry, your chopped cheese is going to have to wait because the cashier at the bodega is making a TikTok video. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

Add Kew Gardens to the list of neighborhoods that are trying to keep Rikers open instead of moving to a neighborhood jails program. (Max Parrott for QNS)

The winter surfers of Rockaway Beach. (Elisha Cooper for NY Times)

Video: New York's prostitution scene in the early 90s. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The deadline for charter school applications in April 1. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Who's the jerk that defaced Shephard Fairey's Debbie Harry mural and Bleecker and Bowery? (Alex Smith for Flaming Pablum)

F.I.T. is in the middle of a shitstorm and at the center of it are that involves the chair of the M.FA fashion design department and Mary Davis, the dean of the School of Graduate Studies, who have both been suspended, and some accessories purchased from Amazon with some very clear racial overtones. (Kimiko de Freytas-Tamura for NY Times)

A coalition of developers and civil rights activists is pushing hard for property tax changes in New York, but the obstacles are formidable. (J. David Goldman for NY Times)

The City Council wants NYC's own big dig-style project to replace the BQE, replacing it with an $11 billion, three-mile tunnel. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

The MTA had a pilot program that gave 1,200 disabled New Yorkers the ability to hail a taxi for the cost of a swipe on the subway and go wherever they needed for that flat fare and the state was covering the difference. What the MTA found was that the people in the pilot program took more trips on average, and the subsidy for those trips was substantial. The cost may be high for these strips (the trips cost $37 on average), but compared to how unfair public transit is to disabled New Yorkers, this seems like a no-brainer, since we're also subsidizing everyone who steps onto an NYC Ferry. The pilot program is undergoing changes that will limit the number of rides able to be taken in a month and also limit what the MTA will pay to $15. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Thanks to reader Paula for today's featured photo.