The Briefly for July 16, 2020 – The “She Doesn’t Even Go Here” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor signed the chokehold ban, congestion pricing is dead, the Times asks if the NYPD has given up on investigating shootings, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 77˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

In 2019, the state budget anticipated a January 2021 start for congestion pricing in the city, which would have helped to the tune of $15 billion over five years to help the MTA. What’s the status? Without federal approval, the project is dead. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A look at the six finalists in the Brooklyn Bridge redesign competition, organized by the city and the Van Alen Institute. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A prayer match from Brooklyn to City Hall, led by Black clergy leaders and sold as a community-focused Christian unity event, turned ugly when it was co-opted by the NYPD and Blue Lives Matter protesters. An NYPD union promoted the event as one of their own, perhaps to make it appear like they have community support. An avoidable situation without the NYPD’s meddling. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NY Times, welcome to the resistance. Today the Times questions if the piles of unsolved shootings across the city, is the NYPD pulling back from its job? The NYPD’s Dermot Shea has a ton of excuses, but ultimately the NYPD made arrests in only 23% of the 634 shootings this year through July 12. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The NYPD confirmed the dismembered body found in a LES apartment was tech CEO Fahim Saleh. Saleh was the CEO of Gokada, a motorbike-hailing app in Nigeria. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A body was found wrapped in plastic underneath a UHaul blanket on the roof of a McDonald’s in The Bronx on Wednesday morning. The cause of death has yet to be determined. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A deeper look at the federal government’s roadblocks on NYC’s congestion pricing. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

West Indian American Day Carnival is going digital for 2020. (Yannise Jean for The Brooklyn Reader)

When baseball officially returns, gets ready for a very odd extra-inning rule that puts a runner on second base automatically. Listen guys, if you don’t want to play past nine innings, just say so. You don’t have to make up new rules. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The High Line opens to the public today, but with a reservation system and from noon to 8 pm. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $9.4 multi-story Upper East Side penthouse with four terraces, a 24-hour doorman, a built-in library and whatever a “supplemental laundry room” is. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will reopen five days a week starting on August 29. (Peter Libbey for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has a new website to promote and sell PPE manufactured at the Navy Yard. They’ll also be selling them in PPE vending machines at West Elms and Wegmans. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Seems that most people are still paying rent. According to the National Multifamily Housing Council, 88% of tenants are paying rent, down only a percent or two from the same time last year. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

“The only reason you’re out here is because you feel guilty.” City Councilmember Stephen Levin’s meeting with his constituents in McCarren Park to explain his “yes” vote on the city’s budget probably didn’t go as he planned. (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

The Empire Center for Public Policy plans to take the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to court for allegedly violating the Freedom of Information Act for failure hand over payroll records of MTA cops. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Robert Bolden is still in the hospital for long-term heart damage after being shot with a stun gun by the NYPD and for multiple fractures to his humerus bone from last weekend’s clash between a pro-police rally and Black Lives Matter protesters in Bay Ridge. Bolden’s lawyer is calling for criminal charges against the NYPD officers who caused the damage to him. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

This is the last story I’m going to link to about the people who ran Ample Hills into the ground for a while. It’s an interview with the owners, which took place before the sale of the business after declaring bankruptcy, which was unrelated to the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s enough with these two, who are already talking about starting another ice cream-related business. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: 9-year-old chess champion Tanitoluwa Adewumi isn’t letting the pandemic get in his way of trying to become a chess grand master. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Mayor de Blasio signed the chokehold ban and police accountability bills into city law on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD forced a homeless man off the subway, cuffed him, beat him, and sent him to the hospital. Cy Vance chose to charge him with assault. One day later and after watching the video of the homeless man getting pepper-sprayed, punched, and pummeled by NYPD officers, District Attorney Vance decided to drop the assault charges but is continuing to pursue charges of resisting arrest. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

AOC is the latest person to pressure Governor Cuomo to back a tax on New York’s billionaires. (Jeffrey C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Feature: Brooklynite Siobhan O’Loughlin’s art requires an interactive audience in an intimate setting. Her show Broken Bone Bathtub literally asks audience members to wash her while she sits in a tub. Under a shelter-in-place order, O’Loughlin pivoted to the heavy task of creating intimate environments with audiences regardless of distance. Her latest show, “My Heart Will Go Zoom,” tells the honest, engaging story of quarantine romance. (Hoa P Nguyen for Brooklyn Based)

9 rooftops your can visit today. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!