The Briefly for August 23, 2019 – The “Can No Longer Get Away With Murder” Edition

NYC’s students are still less than 50% proficient in English and math, 15 restaurants to BYOB, Di Fara reopens, the Museum of Ice Cream find a home, and more in today’s NYC news digest

This weekend’s scheduled subway disruptions look minimal on the surface, but the 1, 2, 3 and 5 trains are still taking a big hit. (Subway Weekender)

The Times is starting to take guesses as to when the mayor finally ends his joke of a presidential bid. (NY Times)

The Museum of Ice Cream is getting a permanent home in Soho on Broadway this fall. Get your Instagram accounts ready. (Curbed)

The NYC Police Benevolent Association’s response to the Daniel Pantaleo firing, who caused the death of Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, is to tour the city’s precincts to say that “no one has our backs,” circulating photos of James O’Neill saying he’s “wanted for killing the NYPD,” and posting in a message board for police officers called the “Law Enforcement Rant” calling Eric Garner’s family “savages” and “ghetto dwellers.” It’s like they no longer think they can get away with murder at their jobs. (Gothamist)

There used to be a bowling alley in the basement, the secret top floor bar, and more secrets of the Jane Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Keens in Midtown is wallpapered with history, with newspaper clippings, photos, playbills, etc on display all over the steakhouse. Until recently, that history included about 10 pieces that featured racist stereotypes. Nothing will put a hamper on your night like finding out your “thumbs up” photo with your steak also featured a large “rival darkies” minstrel show ad in the background. (Eater)

A venomous snake went missing two weeks ago in the Bronx Zoo’s “Jungle World” exhibit. It’s still missing. (Bronx Times)

A man was crushed to death by an elevator in Kips Bay in an elevator that was ordered to be shut down in May by the Department of Buildings. (NY Times)

Billionaire’s Row residents tried to take the mayor up on his offer to do “anything” to rescue the Di Fara pizzeria by offering to pay Di Fara’s tax bill if the mayor would stop a homeless shelter from opening in their neighborhood. (Patch)

No need, because Di Fara reopened on Thursday afternoon. (Grub Street)

NYC student achievement is rising, but still, only 46% of the city’s third through eighth-graders passed the state’s math exam and only 47% passed the English exam. Both numbers are up from last year, but both fall short of the city’s 50% goal. (NY Times)

The 7 train continues to drop debris from its elevated tracks in Queens. This time it was a piece of metal the size of a brick that luckily avoided hitting anyone. The MTA has installed netting as part of a pilot program in some areas of the 7 train, but clearly not in enough locations. (Gothamist)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge is scheduled to open next month, four years ahead of schedule. (Sunnyside Post)

The Department of Homeless Services announced a joint operation between DHS and NYPD in an effort to offer services and not punishment to the city’s homeless on the subways. (Curbed)

Next month the MLB FoodFest brings foods from every Major League Baseball stadium to Midtown. You won’t have to go to Texas to get the dilly-dog: a hot dog stuffed inside a pickle and fried like a corn dog. (amNY)

The top 15 restaurants where you can BYOB. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for August 21, 2019 – The “Bragging About Being Better Than Queens” Edition

Two Proud Boys are convicted, Cuomo bans floating billboards, the city’s secret waterfalls, the Ritz-Carlton penthouse is for sale, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

What are your neighbors complaining about the most? (The Real Deal)

The latest exhibit at the Transit Museum focuses on the history of subway signs. (Untapped Cities)

Have you been indoctrinated into the cult of cauliflower gnocchi? (Grub Street)

Nothing is as Brooklyn as bragging about being better than Queens. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: The abandoned Miller Air Field in Staten Island. (Untapped Cities)

Manero’s Pizza has stepped into the city’s pizza battles with a hybrid New York/Neapolitan slice. (Grub Street)

It’s not a pre-snowstorm run on food, this disaster is the modern-day Dean & Deluca’s. (Eater)

A guide to $1 happy hour oysters, the holy grail, in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The safest neighborhoods in the city. (StreeyEasy)

Wayla vs Wayan vs Wayo. Getting the restaurant names straight in the city isn’t as always simple. (Eater)

Following the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, activists have named five additional officers who they say should be fired for their connection to the death of Eric Garner. (Politico)

New York joined the lawsuit against the federal government over the finalized changes to the “public charge” rule, which will deny citizenship, visas, and green cards to immigrants enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (amNY)

July was the tenth hottest month in NYC history. (Gothamist)

Where to find the city’s secret waterfalls. (6sqft)

Not on the list is the Marcy Houses, where tenants were battling a waterfall in their stairwell due to a burst pipe. (Patch)

The mayor has claimed victory in reforming the NYPD, but the reality isn’t as simple. (Gotham Gazette)

The AirTrain to JFK will be increasing in price from $5 to $7.75 starting November 1. (Second Ave Sagas)

The digital billboards that have been floating around Manhattan are illegal as of Monday, when Governor Cuomo signed a bill to law making them immediately illegal. The company behind the billboards has vowed to find a new loophole to continue their annoying goal of making sure New Yorkers are always looking at advertising somewhere. (NY Times)

Everyone is prone to make real estate mistakes, but not everyone writes an essay for Domino Magazine about it, but then again Lena Dunham isn’t everyone. (Domino)

Vendors could be banned from the Dyker Heights Christmas lights displays this year because of the volume of trash visitors left lying around in previous years. New Yorkers are renown for disposing of their garbage anywhere they’d like, and a neighborhood that’s residential through most of the year isn’t meant to hold the trash of 150,000 visitors. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to address the homelessness crisis in his last mayoral campaign, but critics say his plans are falling short. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Deed Theft Bill” into law, which provides greater protections for owners of homes that are in default or foreclosure. (Kings County Politics)

Does the opening of the Brooklyn Grange, the city’s largest rooftop farm, signal a real change for the city? (Brooklyn Based)

Maxwell Hare, 27, and John Kinsman, 39, guilty of attempted gang assault, attempted assault, and rioting as part of the Proud Boys fight on the Upper East Side in October of last year. They’ll be sentenced in October and face up to 15 years in prison. (Gothamist)

The best new restaurants on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The ultimate guide to renting in NYC. (Curbed)

If you’ve got $49 million and a burning desire to live in the Ritz-Carlton’s penthouse, I’ve got an apartment to sell you. (The Real Deal)

The PlayStation Theater in Times Square will be closing January 1. The last shows at the theater will be a four-night run by the Disco Biscuits. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Nike York City? The city agreed to license its logo and a few dozen other ephemera to Nike to print them on its merchandise. Does anyone want an NYPD Bomb Squad sneaker? (Patch)

Here are the companies in NYC with the fastest revenue growth. (Patch)

Whatever a “classic NYC experience” is, amNY has a list of restaurants where you can still experience it. (amNY)