The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for July 29, 2019 – The “Are Inflatable Rats An Endangered Species?” Edition

Crown Heights looks for an upzoning compromise, how much you need to afford a two-bedroom apartment, Gil the guide dog learns the subways, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Clumsy, overcooked and pointless.” Moulin Rouge on Broadway isn’t winning over critics. (amNY)

Inside the Department of Sanitation’s Certified Organic Recycling (CORe), which probably smells just lovely, where they are turning the city’s food scraps into methane that will be used to heat homes and run in natural gas lines. (Bushwick Daily)

A fifth NYPD officer since June has committed suicide. Commissioner James O’Neill declared a mental health crisis in June in an attempt to fight the stigma of seeking help. (NY Times)

Don’t leave your unwanted pets in the city’s parks, they don’t have the survival instincts necessary to stay alive. A rabbit was rescued from Prospect Park. Larry the bunny is in a foster home in Bergen Beach. (Patch)

Is the inflatable protest rat an endangered species? (Gothamist)

Amazon continues to make headlines whenever the company looks at office space. After abandoning the Long Island City HQ2 idea and One Court Square’s million feet of office space, they’ve continually looked for a smaller space for their current NYC employees. The latest location is the old Lord & Taylor building on Fifth Ave, which is currently owned by WeWork. (Curbed)

Has street flooding during rainstorms always been this bad? The city’s construction boom is contributing to the floods. (Gothamist)

An attempt to answer the question “why is the city so loud?” (Viewing NYC)

How much should you be earning to afford a two-bedroom apartment in the city? According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, it’s $162,857, but when was the last time you knew anyone to only spend 30% of their income on rent? (6sqft)

Advocates in Gowanus are proposing the idea of an Environmental Special District to prevent any new construction due to a possible rezoning to prevent adding more wastewater that would end up in the canal, potentially spoiling the ongoing Superfund work. (Curbed)

The latest location for a flower flash was one of the city’s last phone booths on the Upper West Side, which was the subject of the children’s book The Lonely Phone Booth. Blink and you’ll miss it because flower flashes sometimes last only a few hours. (Gothamist)

Another week, another entry into the 100+ point health inspection violation club. Among the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is Jorge’s in Ridgewood with 124 points. (Patch)

Find every Privately Owned Public Space in the city with this map. (Viewing NYC)

After 20 years, Park Slope rents will finally drive gay bar Excelsior out of business for good. (Bklyner)

The city is suing American Airlines for violating its paid sick leave laws, passed in 2014. (Gothamist)

Come for the photos of Gil, an eight-month-old Labrador retriever, stay for the story of a guide dog learning how to navigate the subways. (amNY)

City Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Daniel Dromm celebrated the New York Public Library’s new $564 million budget with Drag Queen Story Hour, which will receive $25,000. (Jackson Heights Post)

A dispensary grows in Brooklyn. (6sqft)

Crown Heights is experiencing something rarely seen in the city: an attempt at a compromise between two competing plans when it comes to the future upzoning of the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Which is worse: Rodents or roaches? (Splinter)

A shooting during a Saturday night block party in Brownsville resulted in 11 wounded and one dead. (Huff Post)

A body was discovered in the waters under the Verrazzano Bridge on Sunday afternoon. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Rising rents may be an issue, but the next retail crisis will come from rising property taxes, which are up 71.6% since 2009. (Patch)

Raising a child in NYC costs more than sending that same child to a four-year state college. (Patch)

The millions of dollars the city has wasted on paying for roof work which should have been free in NYCHA buildings would have been better spending lit on fire to replace the failed heating systems. The spending on roofs still under their warrantees was discovered by City Comptroller Scott Stringer. (NY Times)

Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney is requesting the mayor have a Canyon of Heroes parade for the survivors and first responders of 9/11. The mayor called it a “great idea.” (Patch)

Sometimes you just want to look at photos of baby animals, and that’s okay. Here are some newborn owls and ospreys born in the city. (Gothamist)

In response to the backlash over some police officers having water thrown on them, the political right (and the president) are demanding respect for the NYPD. Josmar Trujillo asks “Have they earned it?” (Gothamist)

The five best ice cream sandwiches in the city. (Thrillist)

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