The Briefly for March 19, 2019 – The “Arrested for the Murder of a Man Who is Still Alive” Edition

Specialized high schools still lack diversity, the photos you take at the Vessel don’t belong to you, the man who shot the Gambino boss, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Newtown Creek is the city’s “other” Gowanus when it comes to toxic waterways that people want to kayak and boat on. (QNS)

The pied-à-terre tax is gaining steam while real estate industry insiders are suggesting lowering taxes even further. (Curbed)

Mesmerizing photos from inside the Hudson Yards’ Vessel. (6sqft)

Here’s an interesting “turns out.” Turns out the photos you take at the Vessel don’t belong to you. They belong to ERY Vessel LLC. (6sqft)

A Florida man was arrested last week for killing an NYPD officer 20 years ago. Someone should tell the NYPD officer, who is still alive. (Patch)

Does anyone actually shop at the Oculus? (r/AskNYC)

“You can’t fit a construction beam onto the subway!” Hold my beer. (@ECM_LP)

A second body was discovered floating in the water by the Brooklyn Army Terminal over the weekend. The NYPD is seeking clues to the identity of the first body found in the water by releasing photos of tattoos on the body. (Bklyner)

Spring is ready to start on Wednesday with a supermoon. (Patch)

The Astoria Blvd N/W station is closed for nine months while it gets a renovation. All service north of Queensboro Plaza will be out of commission for the next 13 weekends. (Gothamist)

BAM is expanding down Fulton Street with the BAM Strong project, set to open in October. (The Brooklyn Reader)

2/3 of voters say that Amazon pulling out was bad for New York. (LIC Post)

It’s like affordable housing, but for retail. City Council member Raphel Espinal’s bill was discussed by the council on Monday, which would mandate affordable commercial rents on the ground floor of any building receiving more than $1 million or more in financial aid from the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Ooooh Yeah, the New York Daily News” – Macho Man Randy Savage in 1994 (Kingdom of Madness – YouTube)

Kudos to Fallon Schwurack for opening up her finances and life to show how she’s making it happen in her 30s in the city while pursuing a career in dance. (CNBC)

The mystery surrounding the bones found in a Queens backyard continues to unfold. (Gothamist)

A look inside Bluestockings, a 10-year-old feminist bookstore on the Lower East Side. (amNY)

Why is it that poorer neighborhoods seem to have the oldest buses in the MTA’s fleet? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 24-year-old charged with shooting the leader of the Gambino crime family says he did so because he was high and feared for his life. (NY Times)

Next month it might actually be warm for a few days. (Patch)

Should serial subway sex offenders be banned from public transit for life? Council member Chaim Deutsch wants to see it happen. (NY Post)

The city’s nurse strike has a potential date of April 2 if a deal isn’t made. (amNY)

The latest specialized high school acceptance rates still don’t reflect the city’s diversity. (Gothamist)

You have more fingers than the number of black students who were offered admission to Stuyvesant High School. (Patch)

Maybe if Mayor de Blasio wants to create 100,000 new jobs, he should start by filling these 14 high-level jobs within his own administration. (NY Post)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 18, 2019 – The “Where Subway Cars Go When They Die” Edition

Broadway’s phantom pooper, the abandoned subway tunnel, a pre-K strike, the 7 train continues to fall apart, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway inconveniences. (Subway Changes)

A look inside the Hudson Yards’ Instagram-bait ‘Snark Park.’ (Gothamist)

Where do subway cars go when they die? They’re dumped into the Atlantic Ocean to become artificial reefs. There are thousands of cars at the bottom of the sea. (6sqft)

One of the two unions representing the city’s pre-K teachers voted to authorize a strike if demands for higher pay are not met. (Chalkbeat)

The federal government dropped their case against the NYCHA now that a monitor has been put in place. (Patch)

The city’s students joined the Global Climate Strike on Friday, inspired by Swedish student Greta Thunberg’s weekly protests. (Gothamist)

Pour out a moldy container in remembrance of the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health this week. RIP Steinway Street Taco Bell/Pizza Hut. (Patch)

Are you ready for a months-long Industry City rezoning fight? Community Board 7 and City Council member Carlos Menchaca are laying the groundwork for an exhaustive review of how the rezoning would alter the neighborhood. (Curbed)

Kew Gardens’ Community Board voted unanimously against Mayor de Blasio’s 29 story 1.9 million square foot community jail plan. (QNS)

The Hudson Yards has already become part of the city. (@jccoltin)

If you’ve got a spare $25 million lying around, there’s a 26 room mansion on the Upper West Side for sale. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Watch seven years of construction on the Hudson Yards in less than three minutes. Who doesn’t love a time-lapse? (EarthCam)

If you thought real estate was expensive above ground, prices below are to die for. (NY Times)

We’re #1! NYC is the city with the most inadequate housing in the country. (Patch)

Was there a connection between the release of a Gotti from prison and the murder of a Gambino family boss? (NY Times)

More than 40 buildings in Manhattan have their own zip codes. Why? (amNY)

At this point, just don’t stand, drive, or exist under the 7 train’s tracks at any point. It happened again on Friday afternoon. (NY Post)

The Citizen app is a must for New Yorkers. Here’s how it works. (NY Times)

The mayor promised 100,000 jobs all paying more than $50k a year. Two years later no one knows how many jobs were created because the city isn’t keeping track. (NY Times)

Forcible touching, persistent sexual abuse, and public lewdness are all misdemeanors, which is why the subways are seeing multiple offenses from the same set of offenders. (NY Post)

There’s an abandoned wood-burning steam locomotive that runs tunnel underneath Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, which pre-dates the Civil War. One man is convinced that the diary of John Wilkes Booth is buried down there, but no one has stepped inside for nearly a decade. (Newsweek)

The Infatuation’s brunch hit list was updated. Get some reservations or else you might be waiting an hour for that mimosa. (The Infatuation)

Who is Broadway’s mystery pooper? (NY Post)

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The Briefly for March 15, 2019 – The “Manhattan’s Getting More Junk in the Trunk” Edition

The death of a supposed mob boss, Lou Reed’s archive is now available at the NYPL, a guide to the Hudson Yards, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The NYPD’s hate crime unit is investigating the anti-Semitic graffiti on an ad featuring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (NBC New York)

The MTA will stop L train construction at 7pm following months of constructing dragging on for nearby residents until 11pm six days a week. (Town & Village)

Is Bushwick ready for a Chipotle with liquor? (Patch)

Lower Manhattan is going to expand by approximately 500 feet in a $10 billion effort to protect the neighborhood from the next superstorm. (Gothamist)

Francesco Cali, the supposed boss of the Gambino crime family, was shot dead in front of his Staten Island home on Wednesday night. No suspect has been identified. (Patch)

Frank Cali’s neighborhood was, as the Times puts it, “a fitting location for an old-fashioned Mafia hit.” (NY Times)

Things are just peachy along the L train, as service to Manhattan was suspended on Thursday morning after debris fell onto the tracks. Also? No L train service between Manhattan and Brooklyn this weekend. (Gothamist)

Watch a visualization of the city’s development from 1609 through today. (Myles Zhang)

30 reliable first date spots in Brooklyn, also 30 places to people-watch first dates. (Eater)

A decomposing body was found in the water near the Brooklyn Army Terminal on Wednesday morning, the man was not identified. (Bklyner)

Okay, is winter over yet? (Patch)

The Department of Health announced five yeshivas who illegally allowed unvaccinated students to attend school and the measles count is now at 158. 137 of those cases are under 18. (Bklyner)

All the restaurant specialty nights worth checking out. (Grubstreet)

A guide to inside Hudson Yards, which officially opens today. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s District Attorney is dipping a toe into the sex work decriminalization debate. He doesn’t support decriminalization but has stated is “rethinking” loitering charges. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Long Island City residents asked for a bike lane along Borden Avenue in January, a cyclist was hit and killed on that road three months later. (Gothamist)

A new bill proposed by City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal would create a searchable database to show empty storefronts that have been vacant for over three months, and owners facing a $1,000 fine for each week they fail to register. (Patch)

Lou Reed’s handwritten poems, sketches, photographs, recordings, and other personal items were acquired by the New York Public Library and will be on display starting today. (amNY)

Part of the celebration of Lou Reed is a limited edition library card sporting his image. (BrooklynVegan)

Everything you need to know about Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. (6sqft)

Where to eat out when you really can’t afford to. (The Infatuation)

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