The Briefly for March 18, 2019 – The “Where Subway Cars Go When They Die” Edition

Broadway’s phantom pooper, the abandoned subway tunnel, a pre-K strike, the 7 train continues to fall apart, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway inconveniences. (Subway Changes)

A look inside the Hudson Yards’ Instagram-bait ‘Snark Park.’ (Gothamist)

Where do subway cars go when they die? They’re dumped into the Atlantic Ocean to become artificial reefs. There are thousands of cars at the bottom of the sea. (6sqft)

One of the two unions representing the city’s pre-K teachers voted to authorize a strike if demands for higher pay are not met. (Chalkbeat)

The federal government dropped their case against the NYCHA now that a monitor has been put in place. (Patch)

The city’s students joined the Global Climate Strike on Friday, inspired by Swedish student Greta Thunberg’s weekly protests. (Gothamist)

Pour out a moldy container in remembrance of the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health this week. RIP Steinway Street Taco Bell/Pizza Hut. (Patch)

Are you ready for a months-long Industry City rezoning fight? Community Board 7 and City Council member Carlos Menchaca are laying the groundwork for an exhaustive review of how the rezoning would alter the neighborhood. (Curbed)

Kew Gardens’ Community Board voted unanimously against Mayor de Blasio’s 29 story 1.9 million square foot community jail plan. (QNS)

The Hudson Yards has already become part of the city. (@jccoltin)

If you’ve got a spare $25 million lying around, there’s a 26 room mansion on the Upper West Side for sale. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Watch seven years of construction on the Hudson Yards in less than three minutes. Who doesn’t love a time-lapse? (EarthCam)

If you thought real estate was expensive above ground, prices below are to die for. (NY Times)

We’re #1! NYC is the city with the most inadequate housing in the country. (Patch)

Was there a connection between the release of a Gotti from prison and the murder of a Gambino family boss? (NY Times)

More than 40 buildings in Manhattan have their own zip codes. Why? (amNY)

At this point, just don’t stand, drive, or exist under the 7 train’s tracks at any point. It happened again on Friday afternoon. (NY Post)

The Citizen app is a must for New Yorkers. Here’s how it works. (NY Times)

The mayor promised 100,000 jobs all paying more than $50k a year. Two years later no one knows how many jobs were created because the city isn’t keeping track. (NY Times)

Forcible touching, persistent sexual abuse, and public lewdness are all misdemeanors, which is why the subways are seeing multiple offenses from the same set of offenders. (NY Post)

There’s an abandoned wood-burning steam locomotive that runs tunnel underneath Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, which pre-dates the Civil War. One man is convinced that the diary of John Wilkes Booth is buried down there, but no one has stepped inside for nearly a decade. (Newsweek)

The Infatuation’s brunch hit list was updated. Get some reservations or else you might be waiting an hour for that mimosa. (The Infatuation)

Who is Broadway’s mystery pooper? (NY Post)

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The Briefly for March 15, 2019 – The “Manhattan’s Getting More Junk in the Trunk” Edition

The death of a supposed mob boss, Lou Reed’s archive is now available at the NYPL, a guide to the Hudson Yards, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The NYPD’s hate crime unit is investigating the anti-Semitic graffiti on an ad featuring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (NBC New York)

The MTA will stop L train construction at 7pm following months of constructing dragging on for nearby residents until 11pm six days a week. (Town & Village)

Is Bushwick ready for a Chipotle with liquor? (Patch)

Lower Manhattan is going to expand by approximately 500 feet in a $10 billion effort to protect the neighborhood from the next superstorm. (Gothamist)

Francesco Cali, the supposed boss of the Gambino crime family, was shot dead in front of his Staten Island home on Wednesday night. No suspect has been identified. (Patch)

Frank Cali’s neighborhood was, as the Times puts it, “a fitting location for an old-fashioned Mafia hit.” (NY Times)

Things are just peachy along the L train, as service to Manhattan was suspended on Thursday morning after debris fell onto the tracks. Also? No L train service between Manhattan and Brooklyn this weekend. (Gothamist)

Watch a visualization of the city’s development from 1609 through today. (Myles Zhang)

30 reliable first date spots in Brooklyn, also 30 places to people-watch first dates. (Eater)

A decomposing body was found in the water near the Brooklyn Army Terminal on Wednesday morning, the man was not identified. (Bklyner)

Okay, is winter over yet? (Patch)

The Department of Health announced five yeshivas who illegally allowed unvaccinated students to attend school and the measles count is now at 158. 137 of those cases are under 18. (Bklyner)

All the restaurant specialty nights worth checking out. (Grubstreet)

A guide to inside Hudson Yards, which officially opens today. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s District Attorney is dipping a toe into the sex work decriminalization debate. He doesn’t support decriminalization but has stated is “rethinking” loitering charges. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Long Island City residents asked for a bike lane along Borden Avenue in January, a cyclist was hit and killed on that road three months later. (Gothamist)

A new bill proposed by City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal would create a searchable database to show empty storefronts that have been vacant for over three months, and owners facing a $1,000 fine for each week they fail to register. (Patch)

Lou Reed’s handwritten poems, sketches, photographs, recordings, and other personal items were acquired by the New York Public Library and will be on display starting today. (amNY)

Part of the celebration of Lou Reed is a limited edition library card sporting his image. (BrooklynVegan)

Everything you need to know about Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. (6sqft)

Where to eat out when you really can’t afford to. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 14, 2019 – The “Don’t Quit Your Day Job, Mr. Mayor” Edition

Stop and frisk is down but not any less worrisome, the best pies for pi day, a 40 year old murder mystery buried in a Queens backyard, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Stop and frisks are reportedly down 98%. Turns out the remaining 2% are just as problematic as they used to be with only 11% of people stopped being white. (amNY)

From 2001’s plan for the 2012 Olympics to this Friday’s opening, a timeline on the major moments for the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

In honor of pi day – the best pies in the city. (Grubstreet)

Mayor de Blasio’s budget for 2020 looks like a series of austerity measures for the city. (The Independent)

Forget it Jake, it’s Raccoon Town. (NY Post)

Plenty of New Yorkers give the finger when they’re upset, but taking a finger? That bites. (Gothamist)

Even though no one wants him to run and he’s polling at a literal zero, Mayor de Blasio said he won’t quit his day job if he decides to run for president. (NY Post)

A BQE replacement alternative idea from City Comptroller Scott Stringer: A temporary “trucks only” highway with a park on top. (Gothamist)

After 35 years, Park Slope’s Old Carriage Inn’s last day is St. Patrick’s Day. (Bklyner)

Wolverine is returning to Broadway. (amNY)

There’s an ongoing shortage of blood, and before you begin your partying on Sunday, there’s a blood drive at Our Lady of Mt Carmel Church. (Greenpointers)

No one’s sure how this baby goat ended up on the Gowanus Expressway, but it was safely captured. (Gothamist)

Photos from in and around the Hudson Yard’s ‘Vessel’ sculpture. (Patch)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (Grubstreet)

Moishe’s and closing is the Ross and Rachel of 2019. Turns out it’s not closing, despite what Moishe Perl told reporters. It should be open in six to eight weeks after renovations. (Eater)

An interview with Dan Smith, who WILL teach you guitar. (Gothamist)

New York City’s elite were caught up in “Operation Varsity Blues,” they just weren’t Aunt Rebecca on Roseanne. (Gothamist)

Coney Island’s Shore Theater will become a hotel thanks to a thumbs up from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. There’s no timeline yet, but it’ll be good to see that scaffolding come down one day. (Curbed)

It’s the Bronx” is aiming to be the “SXSW of the Bronx.” (6sqft)

Do you deserve your seat on the subway more than someone else? (Gothamist)

You know that body cam recording of an NYPD cop giving her boss a hummer? Yeah, it was a fake. (NY Post)

More Anti-Semitic graffiti, this time in the Nassau Avenue stop on the G train on an ad for a book about the Notorious RBG. (Greenpointers)

The Chrysler… hotel? (Gothamist)

It’s all under a cloak of mystery, but four members of the City Council are under investigation for possible misconduct. (Patch)

Isabella Goodwin: From police matron to the city’s first female police detective. (NY Times)

A farm grows in Brownsville. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How Manhattan’s streets and avenues are numbered. Yes, it’s more than just “Manhattan’s a grid.” (StreetEasy)

The City Council is looking to make the city’s lead inspection regulations the toughest in the nation with a set of 10 new bills. (Patch)

Just a list of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s humanizing moments. (amNY)

The NYPD is investigating a 40-year-old mystery after a body was dug up in a backyard in Queens. (NY Times)

Where to go with someone who’s “just reaching out” to see how you like working at your company. (The Infatuation)

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