The Briefly for September 30, 2019 – The “14th St Busway has Risen from the Dead” Edition

The one impeachment holdout in New York’s delegation, the best pizza on the UWS, Battery Park City’s green dog poop, it’s gonna be a hot hot week, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are pretty rough, so check the routes before you go anywhere late. (Subway Weekender)

Summer is stretching into this week with temperatures predicted to hit 90 degrees on Wednesday. (Patch)

The only Democrat in the House of Representatives not calling for the impeachment of the president is Staten Island’s Max Rose. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cuomo wants it both ways when it comes to the impeachment. (Patch)

The 14th St subway is back and may even start as early as this week. (Streetsblog)

Battery Park City is going to compost the dog poop at its dog runs. (Tribeca Citizen)

The Dayspring Church, built in 1924 on Roosevelt Island, will become a speakeasy restaurant. (Eater)

The best pizza slice shops on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

If you’ve got $118 million, you can buy yourself two penthouses in the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

Protest sleep-outs in City Hall Park have existed since 1985. The protests have been suspended since 2012 due to Mayor de Blasio’s promises to alleviate the situation, but last week the protests began anew. (Gothamist)

The worst commuter train in America is in New Jersey. Ha! (NY Times)

Meet the 92nd Street Y’s new chief executive Seth Pinsky, the head of the Bloomberg administration’s economic development arm. (NY Times)

In celebration of the graffiti-tagged subway cars of the city in the 70s. (Gothamist)

It’s illegal for trucks to idle for more than three minutes. If you report idling trucks, you could get a reward. (Greenpointers)

There are new deadlines for voter registration in New York. You can change your party enrollment until February 1 to vote in the April presidential primary. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Legal Aid Society is raising money to help pay for fees associated with green cards, visas and other documents that give immigrants legal status. Help your fellow New Yorkers. (Patch)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortex is joining the calls for a bailout of the city’s taxi drivers, calling their plight “indentured servitude.” (NY Times)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health is pretty tame compared to most weeks. (Patch)

Korey Johnson, the man who allegedly ran down and killed a cyclist in Brooklyn with his SUV, was charged with second-degree murder, first-degree reckless endangerment, and faces 25 years to life if convicted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The preparation for the Macy’s holiday windows has already begun in Red Hook. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The latest public work from Kehinde Wiley, known for President Obama’s portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, is Rumors of War a nearly 30-foot tall sculpture that is evocative of a confederate monument but instead features a young African-American male in contemporary clothes. (Time Out)

The L Train Slowdown will end by April 2020 rather than July 2020, three months earlier than scheduled. (amNY)

If you didn’t understand what was happening in the Tekashi69 court case, here’s the Old Gray Lady to explain it. (NY Times)

The City Council is looking into the impact of film shoots in residential neighborhoods and is considering a suite of bills to strengthen residents’ rights. (Bowery Boogie)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in the West Village. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for September 26, 2019 – The “Nightmare NIMBY Neighborhood” Edition

The MTA’s $51.4 billion Captial Plan was approved, white New Yorkers are twice as likely to smoke marijuana, Facebook eyes the post office, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Working Families Party is accusing Governor Cuomo of creating a conspiracy to destroy them for daring to run Cynthia Nixon against him in his last primary. (NY Times)

Andrew Cuomo and his longtime girlfriend Sandra Lee have the world’s largest display of LEGO art” with classics like Michaelangelo’s David, Degas’s Whistler’s Mother, Munch’s The Scream and Van Gogh’s Starry Night interpreted in LEGO starting this weekend at the New York Hall of Science. (Time Out)

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and New York State Attorney General Letitia James sued ICE over the arrests that have taken place outside of the city’s courthouses. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Screaming, propaganda, shoving, conspiracy theories about the Department of Transportation, and accusations of taking money from pedophiles, just another day in the NIMBY-nightmare neighborhood of Park Slope. (Streetsblog)

A peek inside Michael Cera’s new $2.4 million Bed-Stuy home. (Mansion Global)

93% of people arrested for marijuana possession in NYC are black and Latino, but white New Yorkers are twice as likely to have smoked marijuana than anyone else. (Patch)

Operation DUMBO Drop 2019 is a go. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

We are a month away from early voting in this year’s elections, so it’s time to start educating yourself about the five ballot questions. (Gotham Gazette)

The $51.4 billion MTA Capital Plan for 2020 – 2024 was unanimously approved by the MTA’s board and has the support of Mayor de Blasio, with a few strings attached. The city is expected to pay $3 billion towards the plan, but during the current 2015-2019 plan the city was expected to pay $2.66 billion, but only paid $790 million. (Streetsblog)

Facebook is eyeing 740,000 square feet of office space at the the midtown post office. (6sqft)

Photos: Inside a 19th-century paint factory, before it becomes luxury loft apartments. (Untapped Cities)

A gold coffin at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be taken back to Egypt after the realization that it had been stolen. (Patch)

If you were at Paul Simon’s last show in Queens, I have some news for you. He’ll be part of Live From Here with Chris Thile on October 26. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: Inside Long Island City’s new public library. (6sqft)

City schools were all set to have a one day work week this year on December 23, but logic has prevailed and students and teachers will get that day off as well, extending winter break from December 21 through January 2. (Patch)

If you’re a big fan of waiting in long lines to get food, Chinese rice noodle roll and congee restaurant Yin Ji Chang Fen has opened an outpost on Bayard St. (Gothamist)

If you define corruption as an illegal act that benefits an individual without punishment because of their office or position, the Brooklyn Borough President’s office is corrupt for their agreement with the Parks Department that allows officials to park wherever they feel in the park that surrounds Borough Hall without consequence. (The City)

Mapping the development boom transforming Crown Heights. (Curbed)

Hart Island’s been in the news a lot lately, today’s update is that there is a concern that it is running out of space as the city’s public burial grounds. Since the Civil War, over a million people have been buried there and in eight to ten years the city needs to find a new place to bury its dead. (6sqft)

As expected, the vape flavor ban is being challenged in court. (amNY)

The city’s grand plans to update and future-proof the Gowanus Canal cleanup have been killed by the EPA. (6sqft)

Enjoy 10 hours in Gowanus (but not in the Gowanus) with this guide. (Brooklyn Based)

It is a misdemeanor under the city’s Right of Way law to fail to yield to pedestrians or cyclists while making a turn after a state appeals court upheld the law as constitutional. (Gothamist)

Where to get drinks in the theater district. (amNY)