The Briefly for June 30, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining on July 6? Not So Fast.” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor announces moving $1 billion from the NYPD’s budget, a peacock escapes the Prospect Park Zoo, Broadway stays dark, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 79˚
Possible light rain in the evening.

The mayor announced that he’s committed to redirecting $1 billion of the NYPD’s funding to other city resources. This is a move that both the police unions and police protestors are upset with. The perfect de Blasio move, creating as much anger as possible on all sides. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Brooklyn got a second Black Lives Matter street mural last week, this one outside of Borough Hall. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

“We don’t need more Black Lives Matter signs painted on streets. We need a real, true cut, and this money laundering ain’t it.” -Nelini Stamp on the mayor’s $1 billion announcement. The announcement includes the transfer of fringe benefits for school safety agents to the DOE, which move around money, which accomplishes literally nothing. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“The purpose of this article is to outline five specific, systemic, attainable reme­dies to the epidemic of police abuse.” This is from May 28, 1985. (David Swanson for Village Voice)

Maybe we won’t have indoor dining starting on July 6? We’re less than a week away from the city’s supposed start of indoor dining and the mayor says he needs to “examine closely and come to a decision in the next couple of days.” The wavering is due to the spike in Covid-19 cases nationwide, not necessarily in the city. When will a decision be made? You’d assume before July 6. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The NYPL lions, Patience and Fortitude, are wearing masks like all good New Yorkers. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An interactive map of apartment prices at each subway stop in the city, with the 2020 edition showing 36% of subway stops experiencing drops in rent. (RentHop)

How much are you supposed to tip movers? The American Moving and Storage Association suggests $25 per person, which doesn’t seem like much for NYC. Here are some things to keep in mind when calculating a tip. (Rita Cidre for StreetEasy)

Tens of thousands of New Yorkers are facing possible eviction without city, state, and federal aid. The stat’es eviction moratorium ends in August, the federal government’s regular Covid-19 assistance ends in July, creating a perfect storm for evictions. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Making the case why New Yorkers won’t actually move to the suburbs. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

With an unsure future ahead for the city’s schools, the Department of Education purchased an additional 40,000 iPads for students for summer school students, adding to the 300,000 it’s already purchased. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Black Lives Matter, representing NYC in Congress, her first two years in Congress, and more. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

We don’t have results from the June 23 primaries and elections yet, and it still may be a while until we get results. There were 765,000 absentee ballots distributed, but only 471,000 votes were cast in person, so when it comes to results we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg. (Jim Brennan for Gotham Gazette)

Broadway will be closed through at least the end of the year. All tickets through January 3 have been refunded, but there’s been no statement on a return date. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Remember how the MTA was in the process of re-designing Brooklyn’s bus systems? Forget it. The MTA says Covid-19 has forced them to put a hold on the plans and they’ll publish a revised timeline in “the next few months.” An announcement to say they’ll make an announcement about an announcement in a few months. The original plan was due at the end of the second quarter. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Will 24-hour subway service ever return? Maybe. The governor is leaving a lot of wiggle room in all of his answers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Will offices ever go back to normal? amNY looks at the Empire State Building as a bellwether for recovery. Only 15-20% of the building’s occupants that could return have returned during phase two. (Imani Moise and Echo Wang for Reuters)

Crown Heights Caribbean spot Glady’s is shutting its doors permanently due to Covid-19. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Downtown Brooklyn Public Art + Placemaking Fund award in Brooklyn is giving grants of up to $50,000 for public art and performance projects looking to revitalize portions of Downtown Brooklyn. Applications are open through June 25, 2020. (BKLYNER)

Around the city, you’ll find flyers for someone selling flan. A look at New Yorkers who have started businesses making cooking and baking during the pandemic. (Devorah Lev-Tov for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio wants to do something about solitary confinement. He’s assembled a “working group” whose job it will be to create a plan to end solitary confinement and “punitive segregation.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Interview: Milton Glaser, shortly before his death, talking about a design idea to unify the city around the word “together.” (Jeremy Alias for NY Times)

13 things you didn’t know about the Woolworth Building. (Michele Cohen for 6sqft)

The city will take over more streets in the evenings to combine Open Streets and Open Restaurants to push restaurant seating into the car lanes and create pedestrian walkways down the center of the street. The streets haven’t been announced but will begin this weekend and run through Labor Day on Friday nights, and all day on Saturdays and Sundays. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The City Council unanimously passed the COVID-19 Funding Tracker Bill to establish a public database to track city spending in an attempt to provide balance for relief throughout the city. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the police’s violent actions against the Queer Liberation March, Washington Square Park’s statues of George Washington were splattered with red paint in protest. Washington was targeted for his ownership of slaves. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

On Saturday the Covid-19 death toll in New York was down to five, the lowest since March 15. With the United States’ cases hitting new all-time highs, will the people who left the city return and bring new cases with them? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

In a ramp-up to the weekend and lifeguards returning to beaches, food vendors have returned to Jacob Riis Beach. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A parakeet has been spotted hanging out in Tompkins Square Park. (EV Grieve)

Photos: A peacock escaped from the Prospect Park Zoo. It checked out Flatbush Ave, was chased around by the NYPD, and flew back home. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Zlata for the photo of last night’s “surprise” fireworks on the East River!

The Briefly for May 15, 2020 – The “Quarantining with a Ghost” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Understanding the state’s reopening plans, what rooftop bars may look like on reopening, make a real NYC bagel, the best hospitals, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 79˚
Drizzle in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 54˚ High: 75˚

A beginner’s guide to understanding New York’s reopening plan. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The City Council’s bill capping fees restaurant delivery apps can charge tops out at 20% and it’s waiting for Mayor de Blasio’s signature. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Let the true 2021 mayoral race begin, as Scott Stringer makes an off-handed remark about Corey Johnson’s predilection for dancing in public. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Happy 100th birthday to Louise Ceci Jacobson, who celebrated with a drive-by parade. (Carlotta Mohamed for amNewYork Metro)

45% of U.S. adults believe in ghosts, but how many of us believe we are quarantining with a specter ? (Molly Fitzpatrick for NY Times)

asian-veggies.com a new Asian produce delivery service in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

Over 100 city kids have PMIS, the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, which may be linked to Covid-19. Seventeen total states and six European countries have reported cases and there have been three deaths from PMIS in New York state so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

President Trump’s playbook seems to be ‘Ford To City: Drop Dead’ (Paul Blumenthal for HuffPost)

Video: There’s the National Debt Clock, there’s the actual clock in Union Square, and now add the Trump Death Clock in Times Square to the city’s list of infamous clocks. (HuffPost)

Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, the couple charged with a hate crime for allegedly attacking a group of Hasidic men, argue that they are the real victims because the men the allegedly attacked were not social distancing. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Let’s take a moment to celebrate anything that brings us an inch closer to the way life was before mid-March. Dunkins across the city have begun reopening. (Give Me Astoria)

What will dining look like once we’re back? A look to California may provide some answers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

An unnamed “famous Upper East Side bar and lounge” and a “trendy downtown hotel” have both supposedly held speakeasy parties this week. A risky move, considering the Post already found out, so city officials can’t be too far behind. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Video: Another disturbing NYPD arrest, this time it’s a 22-year-old mother being violently arrested while walking with her toddler. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You’d be surprised how NYC hasn’t changed int he last century from this aerial photograph from 1933. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Broken machines, staff shortages, a lack of bilingual interpreters, and polling locations that weren’t accessible to the disabled. A report released Thursday by City Comptroller Scott Stringer found “widespread mismanagement and lax recordkeeping” by the city Board of Elections in last year’s general election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

NYU Langone Medical Center and NYC Health + Hospitals – Metropolitan came out on top of Leapfrog’s list of the best and worst hospitals in NYC. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Twenty community clinics will now make free coronavirus testing available to all people showing symptoms, with an additional 12 clinics scheduled to be added to that list. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Followup to the story about Dr Oxiris Barbot, the city’s health commissioner, and a comment she made to Terence Monahan, the NYPD Chief of Department, Dr Barbot has already apologized. Ed Mullins, the head of the NYPD’s union who is the subject of an NYPD Internal Affairs probe, continues to push on Twitter, having called Dr Barbot a “bitch.” It’s time to move on Ed. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Will rooftop bars still be a thing this summer? Here’s a what they could look like. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

This is NYC’s biggest asshole, who thought dumping a Rubbermaid container of cereal and milk on the subway would be funny. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Shopsin’s is back at Essex Market. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The schedules for virtual Brooklyn and Queens Pride Month events have been released. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Community health centers in the city will receive $22 million in emergency funds from the federal government to bolster coronavirus testing capacity. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Ahead of expected budget cuts, CUNY is looking to cut its budget by $10 billion, with adjunct professors first on the chopping block. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The meat shortage,” as explained by the city’s meat suppliers. (Kitty Greenwald for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio appointed at least 80 donors to advisory groups that were formed to help shape New York City’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. There are a total of 330 people appointed to the groups. (Anna Sanders for NY Daily News)

As the city creeps towards a reopening, beauty salon owners don’t feel like they have a seat at the table. Maybe they should have donated more to the mayor? (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Frozen on Broadway is closed. The show will not reopen once Broadway returns. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The head of the city’s contract tracing program is the same person who gave Mayor de Blasio advice in March that there was “no proof that closures will help stop the spread,” and believed that large events should have continued as planned. This was happening while the mayor’s top health officials were threatening resignation in protest if the mayor didn’t listen to them. (William K. Rashbaum, J. David Goodman, Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

10 ways for adding more plants in your NYC apartment. (Localize.City)

This weekend’s project? Make real New York-style bagels at home. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 6, 2020 – The “Getting Punched in the Head Feels Excessive” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Everything you need to know about NYC’s subway overnight shut down, The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, New York wants to “Reimagine Education,” & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 55˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

Last night was the start of the four-hour subway shut down for cleaning. The MTA will be testing UV lights and anti-microbial products after each car is disinfected. While the trains are shut down buses will be operating for free. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The overnight shut down of the subways, explained. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The Times chronicled the historic night one of the MTA’s first-ever planned subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Is the end of 24-hour subway service? No, according to the governor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Another day, another video of NYPD officer punching a black New Yorker in the head during a social distancing arrest. “A punch should not be assumed to be excessive force.” -Dermot Shea, NYPD Commissioner. The person being arrested appeared to be handcuffed, on the ground, and had three officers on top of them when punched. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 10 best bike shops in New York City. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We’ve got an Aerogarden in the kitchen with some cherry tomatoes, how’s your quarantine garden going? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Like many of us, Andy Warhol bounced around the city, and so did where he did his work, The Factory. A look at where Andy Warhol lived and worked in NYC. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

Looking to work on your art in quarantine? The Metropolitan Museum of Art is offering a free botanical drawing class online. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn is “ill equipped” to identify cases of COVID-19 and stop the disease from spreading among its nearly 1,700 detainees, according to a doctor who visited the federal jail last month. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Mariah Kennedy-Cuomo, the governor’s daughter, made the suggestion that not everyone wants to listen to Governor Cuomo tell them what to do, so the state is launching a competition for New Yorkers to submit videos explaining why its important to wear masks in public. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s National Nurses Week from May 6-12 commemorating Florence Nightingale’s work in Crimea in 1854, and it couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time to honor the nurses in the city and across the country. (Isabelle Bousquette for QNS)

More information on the possible Covid-19-relate illness that has stricken over a dozen children in the city, from ages 2-15. If you have a child with a rash, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea, please contact a doctor.(Amanda Eisenberg and Erin Curkin for Politico)

Welcome2TheBronx has started a fundraising campaign to continue its coverage of the Bronx. The site has been around since 2009 and has become one of the more important voices when it comes to covering and changing the narrative about the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

There wasn’t much good news to be found in City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s analysis of the city’s 2021 fiscal budget, which starts on July 1. The budget gap is looking to total about $8.7 billion and with an unemployment rate of 22% this quarter, the city is finding itself dug into a pretty deep hole. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A last-minute NYC mother’s day gift guide. Yes, during a pandemic, Wednesday is the last minute when it comes to Mother’s Day. (The Infatuation)

Video: These sidewalk tents are a pretty good way to keep your social distance. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is turning to The Gates Foundation to help “reimagine education” for the state of New York as we continue forward with our new normal. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Over 1,200 independent music venues and promoters have banded together to form the National Independent Venue Association, or NIVA, with the goal of “securing financial support to preserve the national ecosystem of independent venues and promoters.” There is a letter template you can use to send to your state and city officials to show support for the city’s independent music venues. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A worker at Amazon’s Staten Island, New York, fulfillment center has died of Covid-19, the company confirmed. Workers at the facility, called JFK8, have been calling for greater safety precautions since early March. (Josh Dzieza for The Verge)

A look into how The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, proposed by Representative Ilhan Omar, may affect you. (Localize Labs)

All hail Hakki Akdeniz, the pizza champ, for distributing pizzas and snacks to those in need on the Bowery over the weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

It’s looking like a rainy set of days ahead, but when it gets warm here is where to get freshly made ice cream and pies in NYC. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Thanks to Jenny for today’s featured photo from the Upper West Side!