The Briefly for March 20, 2020 – The “Someone Check on Jen Carlson” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: COVID-19, how to help restaurants, landlords find a loophole in the eviction moratorium, some mortgages are paused, alcohol delivery & pickup guide, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 72˚
Possible light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 50˚

Governor Cuomo suspended mortgage payments for anyone who lost hours or is working part-time. The full details of who is eligible are not available yet, but it’s a step in the right direction. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Okay but what about rent? (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

If you heard that New York was freezing medical and student debt, you didn’t hear the whole story. As usual, it’s more complicated than it sounds and isn’t nearly as wide-spread as it should be. It specifically refers to delinquent debt owed to state-run institutions that were been referred to the Attorney General’s office for collection. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

In the era of coronavirus, 911 calls are getting weird. (EV Grieve)

Someone check on Jen Carlson at Gothamist, because she seems to have fallen in love with the pre-Governor Cuomo press briefing announcement music and dubbed it “Cuomocore.” (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Chinatown’s Nom Wah Tea Parlor is 100-years old. It’s seen the Great Depression, multiple wars, and now COVID-19. Can it survive? (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Video: A bike ride through a desolate Chinatown. (ActionKid)

Whole Foods added an early hour for customers over 60 to allow the most vulnerable to COVID-19 to feel comfortable while shopping for necessities. (EV Grieve)

Our parks will never go unappreciated again, they’ve provided us with a place to go and still stay distant from other New Yorkers. (Ariama Long for Kings County Politics)

“We’re writing to let you know that a positive case of the coronavirus (COVID-19) was found at our facility today.” -A text sent on Wednesday announcing COVID-19 had found its way inside of an Amazon warehouse in Queens. (Olga Khazan for The Atlantic)

Amazon reopened the warehouse after four hours, saying it was disinfected, but employees are skeptical and continue their calls for the company to do more to protects its workforce. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is still cleaning up the panic and confusion that Mayor de Blasio created when he off-handedly decided to make a comment about how he may order the city to shelter-in-place. The governor is the only person who can declare that and he has said multiple times that he never would. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The mayor, desperate, asked Elon Musk for help making ventilators via Twitter. Elon Musk’s companies have never made ventilators, but that didn’t stop him from Tweeting that he thinks that they could. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Are you stir-crazy enough to sing “Yellow Submarine” with your neighbors? (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A judge put a moratorium on new eviction cases last week, so why can new eviction cases still be filed this week? Landlords have, of course, found a loophole and the confusion is dangerous. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Photos: The city’s transit hubs are barren. (Michelle Young with photos by Aaron Asis for Untapped New York)

The governor further restricted the maximum percent of any company that will be allowed to work onsite to 25% from the previously mandated 50%. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

There are free breakfast and lunch available at local schools for students, but not many are taking advantage of it. (Tribeca Citizen)

“Who cleans those outfits?” is not a common question when it comes to Broadway, but someone has to clean them, right? Unfortunately with Broadway closed, Tony Award winners Ernest Winzer Cleaners is hurting. They give out Tony awards for dry cleaning? I’ve got to re-align my EGOT strategy. (Nancy Coleman for NY Times)

Rose O’Donnell is bringing back ‘The Rosie O’Donnell Show,’ virtually, for one night to raise money for The Actors Fund. You can catch the show streaming on The Actors Fund’s YouTube channel on Sunday at 7 pm. There are over 40 guests lined up for the show. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at The Tiny Cupboard, the self-proclaimed “world’s smallest venue.” It’s up three flights of stairs, behind multiple doors and artist’s spaces, and yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

Add Marie’s Crisis to the list of streaming activities you can take part in during a… crisis. If you’re looking to get loaded and poorly belt out some Broadway tunes, here’s your opportunity. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Biqtch Puddiń is bringing a drag show with over 20 performers to Twitch. You can catch Digital Drag: An Online Drag Show on Friday, March 20 at 7pm. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

New York City’s ambulance crews, which are stretched thin, have been told to work even if exposed to the coronavirus — as long as they are asymptomatic. Last week there was one paramedic infected, now 150 are in quarantine. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

As the city’s hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with patients, 1,000 retired health care professionals are returning to service. Between retired, student, and faculty volunteers, 1,746 have stepped up to help. (Adan Nichols for Patch)

An interview with Rafael Espinal, President of the Freelancers’ Union. (Tyler Wetherall for Brooklyn Based)

The Metropolitan Opera, the largest performing arts organization in the U.S., has laid off all of its union members, including all of the opera’s musicians, chorus singers, and stagehands. The remainder of the Met’s season has been canceled and union employees have been offered health care coverage through the crisis. Non-full-time performers are out of luck. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This year is the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Wonder Wheel in Coney Island. One day we may be able to celebrate that. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

An interview with and lockdown advice from the author of “How to Drag a Body and Other Safety Tips You Hope to Never Need.” (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

15 NYC bookstores offering curbside pickup and delivery. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Stuyvesant High School admitted ten black students this year, up from seven last year, out of a freshman class of 760. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)
s
A list of galleries that are creating online viewing rooms to exhibit art. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A first look at Staten Island’s drive-through center for COVID-19 testing. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Eight Rikers Island detainees have shown COVID-19 symptoms after one inmate in his 30s tested positive. 40 detainees who are considered higher risk are being considered for release in an attempt to prevent further spread. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Use some of your time to do something good this weekend. The Library of Congress has a program called “By the People!,” which is asking for your help to transcribe significant documents. You can even do it while you re-watch Parks & recreation for the 2nd time this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York City Council Members Inez Barron (East New York, Brooklyn) and Richie Torres (Bronx) have tested positive for COVID-19. Inez Barron’s husband Assemblymember Charles Barron announced a few days ago he tested positive. (East New York News)

Dispatches from the last night of drinking in bars. (Nick McManus for Bedford + Bowery)

Here’s what restaurant and delivery workers need to know about the new paid sick leave laws. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

How to help restaurants and bars right now. One thing: Stop using Seamless or GrubHub to order. They haven’t waived their fees (which can be up to 25% of your bill), they’ve only deferred them. Use Seamless to make your decision, but actually call the restaurant and give them all your money directly. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The alcohol delivery & pick-up guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 13, 2020 – The “Are We Ready for an NYC Yang Gang?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo negotiates for the Trusted Traveler Program to return, Pennsy is closing, a spiked seltzer festival is coming, the Knicks are worth too much, and more

Today – Low: 30˚ High: 48˚
Light rain until evening.

Pennsy, the food hall attached to Madison Square Garden, is closing at the end of the month. The closure is part of a renovation of the area by Vornado Realty Trust, the landlord, and extend the first four floors of the building. Hiding in this news the announced closure of The Cinnamon Snail, the amazing vegan eatery with fantastic desserts, for good. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

What the hell is going on at Etiquette in Williamsburg, a cafe and bar that features a queen-sized bed. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Photos: Jeff Leatham’s Kaleidoscope at the New York Botanical Garden Orchid Show, which adds light installations and sculpture to the show. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

2021’s mayoral candidates think we need more education about ranked choice voting. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Will the math add up for Andrew Yang to run for mayor? (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Governor Cuomo seems to have come to an agreement with the Trump administration that would allow New Yorkers back into the Trusted Traveler Program without giving the federal government unfettered access to the state’s DMV records. (Azi Paybarah and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPD arrested a journalist for filming an arrest of a man in Chinatown. It is 100% legal in NYC to photograph or video record anything that is happening in public, including police actions, as long as you’re not in the way. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NYC is coronavirus free! All suspected cases were negative. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: Backstage at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. (Photos by Milo Hess for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Momo, the city’s hospital system’s very good first resident therapy dog. (Lydia Hu for NY1)

Here comes the city’s first ever spiked seltzer festival on May 16. Oh boy. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

The inside story of the long, slow, and painful death of Fairway. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

Come on restaurants, post your menus with prices online. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

How to make a reservation in NYC. It’s not always as simple as opening an app. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

These are the city’s top high schools, with Trinity High School coming in at #1 overall and Stuyvesant as the top public high school. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

With a seven season losing streak, the Knicks have been a very bad team for a long time, but that doesn’t seem to impact their value. The team was valued at $4.6 billion, making it unlikely that someone is rich enough to take the team from James Dolan’s grubby hands. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

The R-42 subway cars have been retired from service after fifty years years of use. (NY1)

Photos: The last ride for the R-42s with a cameo from Train Daddy Andy Byford. (Sydney Pereira, photos by David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

Tension surrounding Morningside Park has not eased since the murder of Tessa Majors. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Video: A walk over the Brooklyn Bridge, through the city’s ugliest subway station, and Battery Park. (Action Kid)

Lawyers representing undocumented immigrants are fighting to stop ICE officers from making arrests at courthouses, which they say are interfering with court cases. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

There is a potential battle in Albany brewing over bail reform, with Governor Cuomo saying the door is open for possible changes, some state senators have jumped on the opportunity to voice their displeasure with the bill they passed last year before anyone has had time to properly judge its repercussions. Albany will always find a way to fight with itself. (Zack Fink for NY1)

When Mario’s Pizza on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx opened in 1915, the biggest concern was World War I, 100 years later it’s still going strong. (The pizza place, not the war) (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Debutante Balls still exist in Manhattan. (James Barron and Elizabeth D. Herman for NY Times)

The 38 best beer bars in NYC. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Mackenzie for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for November 20, 2019 – The “These Transit Nightmares Are Real and Preventable” Edition

What happens to the star atop the Rockefeller Center tree, New York sues Juul Labs, behind the scene’s at Scarr’s Pizza, the best restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A tribute to the hustle of New York City’s fauna, like Soda Can Raccoon and Murder Cat. (NY Times)

Checking in on the red tailed hawks in Tompkins Square Park. (Laura Goggin Photography)

The D train provided a literal nightmare last Friday night when it sat in a tunnel without moving, without cell service, and without announcements. People on the train say it was for two hours while the MTA claims it was only 76 minutes. That’s the kind of experience that makes someone stop taking the train completely. (Gothamist)

The June 2018 ceiling collapse at the Brooklyn Heights subway station could have been prevented. That’s the word from the MTA’s Inspector General, which released a report on the indecent and also points at the MTA’s ineffective inspections of stations and lack of knowledge of terra cotta. It pairs well with a 2010 report which states the MTA’s engineers don’t have enough knowledge of arched brick and suspended ceilings. Reassuring. (Gothamist)

He was expelled from the state senate when he was charged with beating and slashing his then-girlfriend, plead guilty to misappropriating over $100,000 in city funds when he was on the City Council, and now Hiram Monserrate thinks he should get back into elected politics. (Gothamist)

The mayor signed the “Streets Master Plan” into law. The plan that will eventually bring 250 miles of bike lanes won’t kick in until after the 2021 mayoral election. (Patch)

This weekend Netflix will be de-aging Little Italy to 1975 like it did for the stars of its movie “The Irishman.” (Time Out)

Does the Rockefeller Christmas tree use the same 900-pound Swarovski crystal star every year? (Gothamist)

A GoFundMe has popped up in support of Elsa, the churro vendor whose arrest went viral. The GoFundMe was set up in partnership with the Urban Justice Center’s Street Vendor Project and will pay Elsa’s lost wages, cost of food, fines, and confiscated carts. any leftover funds will be distributed to vendors in similar situations. (Jackson Heights Post)

The city is suddenly overrun by ice skating rinks. Rockefeller Center, Bryant Park, DUMBO, Central Park, Prospect Park, and now The Rooftop at Pier 17 at the South Street Seaport is added to the list. (6sqft)

Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square festival and tree lighting will take place on December 2. (amNewyork)

The city will acquire 14 cluster sites, buildings whose landlords are paid by the city to temporarily house homeless families, and cover them into permanent housing for 200 families. Mayor de Blasio has said he will end the practice, which was put it place by Mayor Giuliani. (amNewYork)

Two corrections officers on duty during Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide were arrested after reportedly skipping their required half hour check-ins with Epstein — on suicide watch — then later fabricated forms to cover their absences. (Patch)

The 2020 NYC Taxi Drivers Calendar, a calendar of “sexy” cab drivers, will be the last. (Gothamist)

The attorney general’s office is suing Juul Labs for targeting kids with e-cigarette campaigns that underplayed the safety risks and emphasized the flavor. (Patch)

A greatest hits of things Mayor Bloomberg has said about stop-and-frisk that he will have to apologize for, like how the NYPD stopped white people “too much,” or how parents should start their own stop-and-frisk programs in the home. (Gothamist)

A preview of what Hudson River Park’s Pier 97 will look like after its $33 million renovation into a park. Pier 97 is at 57th and 12th in Manhattan. (Curbed)

Video: Go behind the scenes at Scarr’s Pizza, one of the best places to get a slice of pizza in the city. (Viewing NYC)

Rep. Nydia Velázquez wants to establish a $1 billion federal program to essentially make mass transit free for people with disabilities, people over 60, and anyone making less than 300% of the federal poverty line. (Daily News)

The best restaurant openings of 2019. (Thrillist)