The Briefly for November 11, 2019 – The “MTA Can’t Ruin Mercury’s Transit” Edition

The 28th cyclist murdered by drivers, Bloomberg is already the most disliked candidate, the new power lunch, more NYCHA problems, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Another Monday, another week of late night subway disruptions. This week’s inconveniences hit the 2, 3, 4, 6, A, D, E, L, Q, and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Mercury will be visibly in transit in front of the sun from 7:30am to 1pm today. It’s probably easiest to see on space.com, but if you’ve still got your eclipse gear you can give that a try. (Time Out)

Retired Brigadier General Dr. Loree Sutton is the newest face to announce her candidacy for mayor in 2021 as a Democrat. General Sutton is the founding Commissioner for the Department of Veterans’ Services. (amNewYork)

The 28th cyclist to be murdered by someone behind the wheel of a vehicle was my friend Matthew Travis Palacios. Matt was riding his bike in the bike lane on 1st Ave at 2:30am on Saturday when a dump truck made an illegal turn, hit him and drive way, leaving him severely injured. He was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. I knew Matt through our involvement in local pro wrestling where he was always someone who made me feel welcome and whose star shined bright. He described pro wrestling as his lifeline. “Every night I come home and hear how someone got shot… like, what if I’m next? But with wrestling I feel like, finally, I have a shot.” RIP Matt. (Heavy)

Michael Bloomberg isn’t even officially in the 2020 race and he’s the most disliked candidate among Democrats. Despite that, he’s already polling at 4%, higher than Mayor de Blasio ever did. (Politico)

That dislike may be earned. When Mayor de Blasio took mayorship of the city it was after his “tale of two cities” campaign which highlighted the inequality created during the Bloomberg administration. (NY Times)

Is the Montauk Cutoff Queens’ High Line? It’s near the Sunnyside Yards, which is supposed to be Queens’ Hudson Yards. Maybe we should just let Queens be its own thing? (Forgotten New York)

It started as a thread of tweets and its ending with an investigation into Goldman Sachs by a New York regulator. For some reason, the algorithm which controls spending limits on Apple Cards, which is managed by Goldman Sachs, assigned a man a credit limit 20x that of his wife, despite her credit score being higher than his. The investigation is into gender bias. (HuffPost)

Salt Bae, the joke that won’t go away, settled a lawsuit with four employees he fired over tip distribution to the tune of $230,000. (Jezebel)

Stop and Frisk, another remnant of the Bloomberg administration, was deemed unconstitutional in 2013. That hasn’t stopped the NYPD, who was caught on video stopping and frisking three young men outside NYCHA buildings without justification. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s surge of police officers on the subways is going swimmingly. Here’s a video of NYPD officers removing a man who fell asleep on the platform waiting for an L train from the station. He wasn’t arrested. (Gothamist)

Having vanquished all other crime in the city, four NYPD officers handcuffed a woman selling churros at the Broadway Junction subway station and confiscated her churros and cart. (Gothamist)

Andy Byford, president of the New York City Transit Authority, has a new nickname: Train Daddy. (Patch)

Train Daddy is bringing bus boarding platforms to 14th St to make bus service even speedier along the street. Each platform will save the time buses take to pull over and stop and also sidewalk space for pedestrians. (amNewYork)

The MTA has signed on to the Paris Climate Accord. As it is pointed out, if the MTA improved its service, it could make the biggest impact on carbon emissions is to improve its service. The city already pledged its commitment to the accord in 2017. (Curbed)

Psychology professor at Kingsborough Community College Joshua Dietz is moonlighting as Josh Neal, a white nationalist and the co-host of a podcast alongside known neo-Nazi and literal punching bag Richard Spencer. (Gothamist)

Flavors of Italy in Manhattan is one of the flavors of restaurants closed by the Health Department last week. (Patch)

23 NYCHA buildings had heat outages this weekend as temperatures flirted with 40 degrees, with the total number of tenants without heat hitting 5,500. (Patch)

The power lunch is dead, long live the new power lunch at Sweetgreen. (Eater)

The NYCHA is spending $363 million to upgrade obsolete boilers, but they won’t be ready to be used until 2023. (The City)

The Charging Bull at Bowling Green is going to be moving. It’s had a hell of a year between being assaulted by a banjo and having a bucket of fake blood dumped on it. The bull will be moved somewhere close to the New York Stock Exchange, maybe to be reunited with the Fearless Girl statue? (amNewYork)

Twenty-seven people were arrested this week for allegedly taking part in a massive $18 million medical insurance fraud scheme, which included bribing 911 operators, medical personnel, and police officers for the confidential information of over 60,000 motor vehicle accident victims. (Gothamist)

Did you get your flu shot? There have been 189 confirmed cases of the flu in the state last week. (Patch)

Mary Frost went to “The Deplorables,” a pro-Trump Broadway charity event, so you didn’t have to. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Spikes, bolts, barriers and more of the city’s hostile architecture. (NY Times)

Dandra is a new sculpture in Tribeca Park of a pair of ten-foot-tell butterfly wings was installed to bring awareness to the trans and non-gender conforming community. It’s by Brazilian artist Robem Robierb, known for making Instagram-friendly art, and named for Dandra dos Santos, a trans woman murdered in Brazil in 2017. (Untapped New York)

Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants for November. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 29, 2019 – The “Seven Years Since Hurricane Sandy” Edition

Italian AOC, Corey Johnson’s Master Plan is expected to pass City Council, the best ramen, dogs in Halloween costumes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Popeyes chicken sandwich returns on Sunday. An excellent pairing with early voting. (Gothamist)

Reminder: Early voting continues all week. (QNS.com)

You can go to the Village to watch the Halloween parade if you’re a masochist, but NY1 will broadcast the parade and there’s a live webcam you can fire up if you can’t “borrow” someone’s Spectrum password. Enjoy costume spotting without braving the rain, people, or the subway ride home. (Curbed)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s “Streets Master Plan” is expected to pass City Council this week, which would add 250 miles of protected bike lanes and 150 dedicated bus lanes to the city. (6sqft)

The mayor supports the plan, but only as long as he doesn’t have to preside over it. The first year of the plan would be 2021, the first year the city would be free from de Blasio’s mayorship. (Gothamist)

Data continues to show traffic on 13th St has not gotten any worse than it was before the 14th St busway. (Streetsblog)

Here’s how NYC is preparing for the next Hurricane Sandy. (Curbed)

Industry City’s 6.6-million-square-foot expansion plan and renderings have been revealed. (New York YIMBY)

Photos: Check out all the good pups in the Fort Greene dog costume contest. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Domestic violence is the leading causing of homelessness in the city. 41% of people entering shelters from July 2017 through July 2018 did so following a domestic violence incident. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

One in ten of the city’s 1.1 million students is homeless, according to the New York State Technical and Education Assistance Center for Homeless Students. (Patch)

Photos: “What’s the big deal about Wegmans?  Am I missing something?” was a text I got from a friend on Monday morning. I honestly couldn’t tell you but it’s hard to argue with the droves of people who showed up in the rain. (Gothamist)

The mayor made a big deal about having “the talk” with his son when it comes to dealing with the police during his failed presidential campaign, but what he didn’t talk about was the more than half a dozen times he had the NYPD drive his son to and from Yale or pick him up at Penn Station when he decided to take the train. The mayor denies this. (Patch)

Photos: The 16th annual Bike Kill, a gathering of “mutant bicycles,” originated by the Black Label Bicycle Club. (Gothamist)

8 of New York City’s spookiest abandoned sites. (6sqft)

There is mounting support for a ban of non-essential helicopter flights around the city, ending the steady stream of sightseeing rides around lower Manhattan and Uber’s new “taxi” service to JFK. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: More from Great PUPkin Halloween Parade in Fort Greene Park. (Gothamist)

Winter is usually the quiet time of year to rent in the city, but there are indications that this year will be tougher than usual. (StreetEasy)

A plan to regulate hotels south of Union Square is being met with mixed reactions. According to City Councilmember Carlina Rivera, the plan would protect neighborhoods against outsized commercial developments like the Moxy Hotel on East 11th St, but it’s met with skepticism that it would instead encourage the development of office buildings. (Curbed)

Why hip hop began in the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Add a tugboat to the things that need to be removed from the Gowanus Canal. The boat started taking on water during Sunday’s rain, eventually becoming almost entirely submerged. (Curbed)

Meet Roger the Sloth, the newest resident at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Does this arrest on the subway go too far? Guns were drawn amid a crowded car to arrest a man for fare evasion. (HuffPost)

The 7th annual Barnacle Parade will be held today (Tuesday) from 4-9 pm in Red Hook on Van Brunt St celebrating the neighborhood’s resiliency in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City Council voted to suspend Andy King for 30 days and fine him $15,000 after a report substantiated a whole list of claims against the member from the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Italian AOC is the best meme of the week. (Twitter)

It’s almost a cliche to hear a company say “unionizing won’t solve the workers’ concerns,” but here we are and of all companies to put that message forward, it’s Housing Works. (NY Times)

Would you be surprised to hear that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s dead presidential run was paid for by donors with city interests? (Politico)

25 of the best ramen bowls in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 18, 2019 – The “What Makes A Beehive A Hipster Beehive?” Weekend Edition

The Rikers replacement plan gets a City Council vote, the weekend’s subway disruptions, ridership on the M14 is up, thrilling breakfast sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Looking to go anywhere on the trains this weekend? Better check the planned subway disruptions before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

The City Council voted to close Rikers Island and the plan to replace it with neighborhood jails in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx is moving forward. (NY Times)

A look back at the Hall of Gems heist at the Museum of Natural History in 1964. (NY Times)

Deep inside the Woolworth Building is a swimming pool that was recently restored in all its stunning glory. (Untapped Cities)

Everyone in the city has enough to worry about before we start with “hipster” beehives. (Gothamist)

The MTA has turned Jay Street-MetroTech into an accessibility “laboratory” with a mix of infrastructure and apps in an attempt to make the station accessible to riders of all abilities. (Curbed)

The Department of Buildings released a new interactive map that tracks after-hours construction permits throughout the city. While it won’t stop the incessant noise, it will help to identify where it’s coming from. (6sqft)

Time Out’s list of the 100 best restaurants in the city has been updated. (Time Out)

The newly-expanded Museum of Modern Art is open, here’s what you need to know. (NY Times)

Brownsville resident Kyle Williams was arrested and charged with murder for the Old Timers Day Festival shooting at the end of July. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you absolutely must dance like an incel on the steps seen in the Joker movie, they’re on W 167th St between Shakespeare and Anderson Aves. (Time Out)

The governors of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania are working together to create standards for vaping safety regulations. (Politico)

The WNBA’s New York York Liberty will return to the city to play games at the Barclays Center after being outcast to Westchester in 2018. If only the Dolan family would sell the Knicks next. (Gothamist)

WNYC is going to end the show New Sounds, hosted by John Schaefer since its debut in 1982 as part of its shift away from music programming. (Gothamist)

A Mrs. Doubtfire musical is coming to Broadway. (Time Out)

The Brooklyn Marathon is Saturday, so get ready for street closures. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Turns out if you make the buses reliable, people want to ride them. Ridership along the M14 bus on 14th St is up since 14th St was cleared of cars. (The Villager)

An NYPD officer fatally shot a man during a traffic stop in the Bronx on Thursday, the second deadly shooting by the NYPD this week and the third time in three days that an officer fired at a suspect. (NY Times)

50-a is a controversial law that shields police personnel records from the public and the state is debating repealing the law. The Police Benevolent Association wants to look like it supports reform but is completely against the idea. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s 86th St has another name: the Pizza Trail. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 12 most thrilling new breakfast sandwiches. (Grub Street)