The Briefly for August 1, 2019 – The “There Are Many Reasons to Dislike Mayor de Blasio” Edition

The Governor’s strategy to stay in the news, mustard ice cream, a call for bike lanes in Long Island City and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Congrats to Queens’ Dalilah Muhammad for breaking a world record in the 400-meter hurdles. (Patch)

Sunday is Lou Reed Thai Chi Day at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch. (amNY)

It took four days of public pressure, but the mayor has finally acknowledged the Brownsville tragedy as a mass shooting. According to the mayor, he’s “come to realize it’s critical we call this what it was.” Would he have changed his mind if not for being publicly chastized about his choice of words? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“De Blasio Appealing To Rural Voters By Touting Destruction Of New York City Under His Watch.” This article from The Onion is so close to reality it’s almost not funny. (The Onion)

All of the 2020 candidates’ favorability ratings increase with the most national exposure they have, except Bill de Blasio. The mayor is the only presidential candidate with a net favorability rating that is under zero. (FiveThirtyEight)

The biggest problem with the mayor is that there are a lot of petty reasons to dislike him, from the time he maybe killed a groundhog in Staten Island to his refusal to not be driven eleven miles to work out, to just being painfully uncool, but for every petty reason there is a substantive reason like his handling of Eric Garner’s death or his multiple ethics scandals or his handling of the Amazon HQ2 situation. Who would continue to run for president despite being universally disliked and polling at virtually zero? The same kind of person that would see 75% of the city he is the mayor of doesn’t want him to run for president in the first place and do it anyway. (Vox)

The mayor is on the presidential trail claiming the city will pass a paid personal leave bill this year, but the city council is not committed to his timeline. (Gotham Gazette)

15 new public art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into law that prohibits school districts to allow teachers or administrators from carrying guns in schools. To quote the governor, the answer to the nation’s school shooting problem “has never been and never will be more guns.” (NY Times)

Have you noticed a steady stream of news about the governor signing bills into law this month? It’s a strategy that Cuomo uses to stay in the news during an otherwise quiet month of the year. (Politico)

Video: What is Louise Jean Signore from the Bronx’s secret to living to 107? Never get married! (Welcome2TheBronx)

The roof of Essex Crossing houses the Essex Crossing Farm. At 10,000 square feet, it’s the largest urban farm in Manhattan and their annual goal is at least 10,000 pounds of produce a year. (Bedford + Bowery)

7 minority-owned businesses in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The mayor is still on pace to hit 300,000 new affordable housing units by 2026, but production has dropped by 22% this year. The difference from 32,344 to 25,299 can partially be attributed to a rare deal made in 2018 for 5,000 units, and not the rent reform laws passed this year, as landlord advocates have claimed. (Gothamist)

The city could do a lot with $40 million, but it’s spent that amount on misconduct lawsuits against the NYPD since January. (Gothamist)

A look at Jay Myself, a documentary which takes a look at the longtime owner of one of the city’s most enigmatic buildings. (Curbed)

City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is calling for a Long Island City bike lane network. (LIC Post)

What has the city done to prevent cyclists from getting doored? “Basically nothing,” according to the founder of the Dutch Reach project. (Gothamist)

How to stay safe as a cyclist, and of course all drivers should know about the Dutch reach. (Brooklyn Based)

A group of luxury homeowners sued to try to stop the city from installing protected bike lanes on Central Park West. It was denied by a judge and construction has begun. (Gothamist)

An interview with Sally Tallant, the new director of the Queens Museum. (Untapped Cities)

The story of 24-year-old David Ballinger, who learned the hard way through a nearly unbelievable series of events that when it comes to finding an apartment in New York City, don’t trust anyone. (Gothamist)

City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer’s latest opinion piece: We need a childcare revolution in N.Y.C. (The Villager)

Mayoral hopeful and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s latest opinion piece makes the appeal for the Brownsville shooting not to reduce the neighborhood to a stereotype, drawing comparisons to the president’s recent treatment of Baltimore. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed that Amazon seems to be interested in all of New York City except Long Island City? (LICtalk)

Three Republicans in the state’s legislature want to make throwing water on police officers a felony. The Legal Aid Society called the proposed legislation “embarrassing.” (Patch)

The cause of death for Layleen Cubilette-Polanco, the transgender inmate found dead in her Rikers Island cell last month, was due to an epileptic seizure. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

A third person has drowned at Rockaway Beach this year. (amNY)

Mustard ice cream? Yeah, it’s a thing and Coolhaus is giving some away this weekend for National Mustard Day, sponsored by French’s Mustard. (Gothamist)

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The Briefly for March 26, 2019 – The “Hey Chicago, Do You Have Any Ideas?” Edition

Bed bugs on Broadway, the MTA asks Chicago for help, subway ridership continues to decline, the history of the best $1 pizza, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governors Island is getting a new arts center in an old munitions warehouse. If you’ve been to the island before, it’s the building near the Manhattan ferry landing with public bathrooms. (Curbed)

An investigation has found credible allegations of sexual misconduct at Saint Ann’s School, the Brooklyn private school known for an experimental approach to education, including male teachers having sex with students. (NY Times)

The MTA, out of ideas on how to stop the 7 train from literally falling apart, is asking Chicago if they have any ideas. (NY Post)

The origin story of the city’s best $1 pizza chain. Isn’t the best $1 pizza akin to the sexiest magician? (Viewing NYC)

New York has fond feelings for a mayor’s 2020 presidential run, and it ain’t de Blasio. (NY Times)

The MTA claims subway performance is increasing, while ridership continues to decline. (NY Post)

A Lyft driver was found unconscious in the back of his vehicle early on Saturday morning. He was pronounced dead of an apparent suicide. This marks the ninth taxi suicide in about 16 months. (Patch)

A preview of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park spring 2019 lineup. (We Heart Astoria)

The city nurses’ strike has been postponed while negotiations are ongoing. (amNY)

Is installing facial recognition software at the entrance of a rent-stabilized apartment building going too far? (Gothamist)

The city’s proposed pied-à-terre tax could cut the most expensive apartments’ price in the city in half. Don’t worry, they’ll still be unattainable. (6sqft)

It’s like a Lyft, but helicopters between Manhattan and JFK for $195 a seat. (NY Post)

Marijuana legalization has failed in New Jersey. (NY Times)

Thanks to a $600,000 from real estate developer iStar, Coney Island’s free summer concerts will continue through 2025. (BrooklynVegan)

Longtime Bronx congressperson Jose Serrano announced he will not seeking reelection in 2020 because he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. (Politico)

Maybe you heard there was an avocado recall. The brutal berries are in Arizona, California, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Not New York. (Grub Street)

Jumaane Williams’s old 45th Council District is headed for a special election on May 14 after Jumaane Williams won the special election for the Public Advocate. There are nine hopefuls who plan to run for the seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you ready for a LEGO-but-not-actual-LEGO-themed bar? (Time Out)

The city’s proposed “express” bus route once the L train rehab begins is anything but express. (Curbed)

A breakdown of how the $78 million sewage tanks for the Gowanus Canal actually cost over over $1.2 billion. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state is “ready to go forward” on congestion pricing. (amNY)

More controversial than congestion pricing is the city’s plans to replace Rikers Island with four smaller jails in every borough except Staten Island. The first step of the application process is complete. (Patch)

Did you know the fountain of youth is in the Bronx? (Atlas Obscura)

From the “don’t go anywhere ever again” files, theater goers on Broadway claim to have “eaten alive” by bedbugs during a performance of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The theater denies the claims. (Gothamist)

A fire prevented the Islamic Society of Mid-Manhattan from prayers on Friday and the Reform Jewish congregation of Central Synagogue stepped up to provide space for their prayers. (HuffPost)

20 restaurants you can actually get into. Tell your friends you “know a guy who can get you in” and be a hero. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 8, 2019 – The “Does NYC’s Best Breakfast Cost Less Than a Subway Ride?” Edition

The Amazon Killer has a new challenger, the latest proposed tax to find the MTA, transformative women of the Village, and more.

Are you ready for the weekend? Are you ready for the weekend’s subway changes and disruptions? (6sqft)

Mark Manders’ “Tilted Head” installation is now viewable at the entrance to Central Park at 60th St and Fifth Ave. It is a giant, crumbling, tilted head, not just a clever nickname. (Untapped Cities)

Food 52 declared the best breakfast in New York City and it’s only $1.75. (Food 52)

Yellow cab drivers are protesting $2.50 surcharge they are charged for any rides south of 96th St, saying the tax unfairly burdens them compared to other for-hire cars. (Gothamist)

Every new proposed tax could help fund the MTA, the latest being a pied-à-terre tax. Now all the state has to do is actually pull the trigger. (6sqft)

State Senator Michael Gianaris, Amazon killer, has some words for David Lichtenstein, the man who said the day Amazon decided to back out of their plan was the “worst day for NYC once 9/11.” (The Real Deal)

Gianaris has competition from within the Democratic party in the form of a 39-year old Justin Potter, owner of DefeatGianaris.com. (LICTalk)1

A bill being considered in Albany would add six holidays to the school year. (CBS New York)

Queens District Attorney Richard Brown announced he’s resigning from the office he has held for the last 27 years due to complications from Parkinson’s Disease. His Chief Assistant John Ryan will take over effective immediately. (QNS)

14 chefs pick the city’s most underrated restaurants. (Grubstreet)

An 11-year-old was taken into custody after making a shooting threat at Bay Academy Junior High School. (Bklyner)

The orthopedic surgeon who bakes pizza. The biomedical engineer Ph.D. who drives an Uber. Brain waste is growing among the city’s immigrant communities. (City Limits)

20 transformative women of Greenwich Village. (6sqft)

5 apps every NYC foodie should download. Don’t worry, none of them are Yelp, Foursquare, Seamless, GrubHub, Meal Pal, or Ritual. (amNY)

Inside Lucali, who Food Insider calls “the most legendary pizza restaurant in Brooklyn.” (Food Insider)

What you need to know about Manhattan’s St. Patrick’s Day parade in Midtown. (Curbed)

The MTA and DOT may bail on the 14th Street busway during the L train rehab. (Streetsblog)

The Weeksville History Center in Crown Heights is holding a Wikipedia-Thon this Saturday to celebrate the importance of the contributions women have made. (Brownstoner)

The long list of restaurants who closed this week, including the 30-plus-year-old Trattoria Spaghetto in the West Village. (Eater)

Would you get a haircut at one of Yelp’s worst-rated barber shops? (Viewing NYC)

Why hasn’t one of the 21 congressional delegates from New York endorsed Senator Kirsten Gillibrand for president? (NY Times)

The story of how an Upper East Side man’s overdose triggered a waterfall of arrests, including an NYPD cop and more than a dozen drug dealers. (NY Post)

The hottest Manhattan restaurants this month. (Eater)

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