The Briefly for May 3, 2020 – The “Does Anyone Know Who is in Charge?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A focus on multiple ways that the mayor seems to have abandoned his leadership role and abdicated control of his city and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚
Heavy rain until evening.

Request an absentee ballot before June 16
Click and sign support for the repeal of 50-a
Donate to The Equal Justice Initiative and The Bail Project

The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met. We are expected to start phase one on June 8.

The recording of the NYPD on their radios saying “Shoot the motherf*****rs,” talking about protestors in Brooklyn.

The 8 pm curfew is now upon us, but it’s not the first time the city has been under curfew. Here are ten times New York City was under curfew. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

Can restaurant delivery workers deliver food after curfew? Will people stocking shelves overnight be stopped and asked for paperwork? The state’s documentation says there are “no specific requirements for ID” when it comes to essential workers. It’s almost like this wasn’t well thought out. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

“I’d rather die than live in a world where this kind of violence is normalized. I’ll jump in front of a million police cars if I have to.” -Devin Khan, who was one of the protesters holding the barricade in front of an NYPD SUV on continued marching. (Virginia Breen for The City)

Who really runs the city? Yes, Bill de Blasio is our current mayor, but in his press conference on Tuesday, Governor Cuomo commented that he would be within his power to “displace” the mayor using emergency powers. If that wasn’t already a troubling enough statement, he also mentioned that the NYPD should use all 38,000 officers. For reference, there were 8,000 officers on duty last night. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Satire (or is it?): “De Blasio: ‘It Is An Honor To Have My Daughter Doxxed By The Greatest Police Force In The World’ (The Onion)

What will Mayor de Blasio say today when it comes to violence across the city? The mayor has shifted the blame on a daily basis. First, it was “out of town” agitators, then it was anarchists, then it was gangs and career criminals. On Tuesday he asked local leaders to “stand up for peace,” after it has become clear that his current approach of “the police will figure this out” is not working out. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Speaker Corey Johnson announced that the City Council will vote to finally make the chokehold illegal in June with a veto-proof majority and the mayor’s opinion does not matter. Under the bill, any technique that restricts the flow of air” will be a misdemeanor. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

When the NYPD wanted Citi Bike and Revel to shut down, the mayor obliged and sent the order. The directive arrived at 10:30 pm on Moday, 30 minutes before the curfew. On Tuesday, Citi Bikes started shutting down before 6 pm. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

New York City legally requires people arrested see a judge within 24 hours. It’s been that way for nearly 30 years. People arrested during the weekend’s protests spent over 24 hours in Manhattan without seeing a judge. To quote the president o the New York State Court Officers’ Association, “Everything is f*****d up.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

“Covering protests, especially chaotic ones, has always been tough. Reporters are used to getting jostled, taunted, and sometimes threatened with arrest. And while the level of aggression has been increasing in the last decade, the number of attacks of the past few days is far beyond anything we have ever seen before.”
– Judy Patrick, VP for editorial content at the New York Press Association for amNewYork Metro, Be outraged over police attacks on journalists in America

Black New Yorkers Talk About Their Fear in Public Space (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

New York Civil Rights Law section 50-A is a state law, the mayor’s support or non-support of its repeal means nothing, but that hasn’t stopped him from talking out of both sides of his mouth about it. He says he supports repeal but he is been responsible for its expansion since taking office. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A new report from the city’s Commission to Combat Police Corruption shows the NYPD’s disciplinary system regularly protects bad cops, including 11 of the 45 cases where the cops involved should have been fired. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Pride Month started with a vigil in Sheridan Square to remember LBTQ people of color lost to police violence as well as other Black Americans who died at the hands of police. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

“Opting to stay silent only suggests that [James] Dolan is compliant with the police brutality and systemic racism that has plagued the cultural landscape of this nation — a tone-deaf action considering his general manager is black and all but one of the players on the Knicks’ roster is black.”
Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro, Knicks owner James Dolan’s silence is part of the problem

There is a narrative that the looting that has accompanied protests is undermining the message, as this piece from amNewYork Metro’s Editor-In-Chief supposes. The way that looting is covered that undermines the message of the protests, not the looting. Yes, you’ll find photos of shattered windows and ransacked stores if you look for it, but you’ll also find photos of people in the streets whose hearts are broken and spirits have sustained much more damage than any building. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

There are always people looking to pervert the message of a protest. The owners of a Staten Island restaurant owners want to open early because people are violating social distancing rules at protests. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

The owner of the Nets, Joe Tsai, has agreed to extend his pledge to pay Barclays Center workers beyond its original date, paying 2,000 part-time workers. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Project)

Inside a $16,000 Covid-19 renovation of Christie & Co. Salon in Bayside. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

Apartment Porn: A $2.3 million penthouse with a roof deck with a view of Billionaire’s Row. A perfect opportunity if you’re dying to regularly moon Billionaire’s Row. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at some of the work of Shelley Seccombe, a photographer who has documented the Greenwich Village waterfront since 1970. (Louisa Winchell for GVSHP)

The free food fridge in Bed-Stuy, set up by Thadeaus Umpster, is inspiring similar acts of kindness across the city. (Angely Mercado for Brooklyn Based)

Governor Cuomo will allow day camps to open on June 29th, including camps in the city. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

RIP Patricia Reed Scott, who helped bring TV and film production back to the city in the 80s and 90s. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

Meghan McCain says her Manhattan neighborhood was “eviscerated.” But also? She’s a liar. What a doofus. (David Moye for HuffPost)

“If I didn’t have a primary, I wouldn’t care.” Congressperson Eliot Engel, who represents portions of the Bronx and Westchester, is a dipshit and is being challenged by Jamaal Bowman in the June 23 election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Click here to request an absentee ballot for the June 23, 2020 election and primary. Do this before June 16.

Information on the NYPD’s shooting of an armed man in response to gunfire in Crown Heights. (Edgar Sandoval and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Opera canceled the rest of their performances for 2020 through New Year’s Eve. (Michael Cooper for NY Times)

10 organizations supporting the Black Lives Matter movement in NYC. (6sqft)

Thanks to reader Mike for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 22, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Are Already On The Streets” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA prepares for floods, the East River Greenway breaks ground, what it takes to wash the subway, and more in this weekend’s NYC news digest.

Check the disruptions before you go. No Q trains north of Kings Highway, no 3 trains at all, and changes to the 2, 5, C, D, E, F, and L lines this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

The strip club Sapphire has invited Kanye West to perform his Sunday Service in their venue for their entertainers, service staff, “and more.” They boast 10,000 square feet and 8,000 women on staff. Think he’ll take them up on it? (Brooklyn Vegan)

The Christmas tree stands have already arrived. (EV Grieve)

Did you see the photo of the Broadway Station subway stairs under water? The MTA was testing barriers to prevent subway stations from flooding on Thursday and it raised more than a few eyebrows. (Atlas Obscura)

The R179 subway cars are two years old, cost about $2 million each, and are less reliable than the R62s, which have been running since 1984. The new ones break down almost twice as much as the R62s. (The City)

$50 strawberries? Is the high end price of anything surprising anymore? (Eater)

A history of ice staking in the city. (6sqft)

Say hello to Detective Abdiel Anderson, the NYPD’s most sued cop. He’s been sured three times in the last six months for civil rights violations, which contributes to his over 40 lawsuits in his 16 years, costing the city over half a million dollars. The NYPD hasn’t stated if he’ll ever face discipline. (Gothamist)

The Met is in danger of losing its “A” credit rating. (NY Times)

NY Democrats prefer Joe Biden for president with 35% support. Second place was Elizabeth Warren with 14%, followed by Bernie Sanders with 13%. (Patch)

Here’s a first look at Sunset Park’s new Made in NY Campus. (Curbed)

A look at Teens Take Charge, a coalition of high school students pushing to have a say in how their public schools are run, and how the system could be more equitable. Monday morning will start a string of protests to call attention to the challenges of school choice. (Gothamist)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Light ceremony will be on December 4 at 8pm. The tree will be lit through January 7, so you’ve got plenty of time to see it decked out in its 50,000 LEDs. (Time Out)

If you want to make a week out of it, Tavern of the Green’s tree lighting is taking place on December 3rd at 5pm. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos and videos form the New York Botanical Garden’s Holiday Train Show. It opens on Saturday and runs through January 26th. (Gothamist)

The Bronx Night Market is the best outdoor food fair, according to the Times. (NY Times)

The city will break ground on the $100 million East River Greenway Link from 53rd to 61st streets. It’s expected to be completed in 2022. (amNewYork)

A sink hole nearly ate a construction vehicle in Park Slope on Thursday morning. A 9-by-7 foot hole opened on 15th St near 4th Ave. (amNewYork)

The most picturesque sites in the Village. (GVSHP)

10 of the best brunch spots in New York City. (amNewYork)

The governor vetoed a bill that would have created a “Bird-Friendly Building Council” to make buildings less likely for birds to fly into them. The New York City Audubon estimates up to 230,000 birds crash into buildings a year. (Curbed)

The mayor announced a new position in the city government to guide, oversee and report on decision-making algorithms going forward, but it creates an exemption protecting the NYPD from oversight. (Gothamist)

The city will close two jails next year, The Brooklyn Detention Complex on Atlantic Ave and one of the Rikers Island complexes, totaling 2,100 beds. The staff won’t be laid off and moved to other facilities. (Patch)

Video: The MTA’s mobile wash team is the Sisyphus of the subways. (viewing NYC)

From 2018 to 2019, 8% more of the city’s high schoolers enrolled in college. (amNewYork)

Everything we know about Market Line, the Lower East Side’s food destination at Essex Crossing that is opening today. (Eater)

Six of the best things to do in the city off-the-beaten path. (amNewYork)

Will there ever be enough odd museums in the city? “No,” says the Makeup Museum, opening in May 2020. (The Villager)

The City Council will ban flavored vapes. 30 members of the 51-member council signed on as co-sponsors of the legislation. (NY Times)

Queens DA-elect Melinda Katz is at odds with current DA Jack Ryan (that’s his real name) when it comes to ending cash bail, which is, and I believe this is a legal term, “tough shit” for Ryan. The state’s legislature passed a law that will end cash bail for misdemeanors and non-violent felonies starting in 2020. (Politico)

A deep dive into how NYC voted in 2019. (Gotham Gazette)

Robert Sietsema’s top five egg dishes around the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 30, 2019 – The “14th St Busway has Risen from the Dead” Edition

The one impeachment holdout in New York’s delegation, the best pizza on the UWS, Battery Park City’s green dog poop, it’s gonna be a hot hot week, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are pretty rough, so check the routes before you go anywhere late. (Subway Weekender)

Summer is stretching into this week with temperatures predicted to hit 90 degrees on Wednesday. (Patch)

The only Democrat in the House of Representatives not calling for the impeachment of the president is Staten Island’s Max Rose. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cuomo wants it both ways when it comes to the impeachment. (Patch)

The 14th St subway is back and may even start as early as this week. (Streetsblog)

Battery Park City is going to compost the dog poop at its dog runs. (Tribeca Citizen)

The Dayspring Church, built in 1924 on Roosevelt Island, will become a speakeasy restaurant. (Eater)

The best pizza slice shops on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

If you’ve got $118 million, you can buy yourself two penthouses in the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

Protest sleep-outs in City Hall Park have existed since 1985. The protests have been suspended since 2012 due to Mayor de Blasio’s promises to alleviate the situation, but last week the protests began anew. (Gothamist)

The worst commuter train in America is in New Jersey. Ha! (NY Times)

Meet the 92nd Street Y’s new chief executive Seth Pinsky, the head of the Bloomberg administration’s economic development arm. (NY Times)

In celebration of the graffiti-tagged subway cars of the city in the 70s. (Gothamist)

It’s illegal for trucks to idle for more than three minutes. If you report idling trucks, you could get a reward. (Greenpointers)

There are new deadlines for voter registration in New York. You can change your party enrollment until February 1 to vote in the April presidential primary. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Legal Aid Society is raising money to help pay for fees associated with green cards, visas and other documents that give immigrants legal status. Help your fellow New Yorkers. (Patch)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortex is joining the calls for a bailout of the city’s taxi drivers, calling their plight “indentured servitude.” (NY Times)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health is pretty tame compared to most weeks. (Patch)

Korey Johnson, the man who allegedly ran down and killed a cyclist in Brooklyn with his SUV, was charged with second-degree murder, first-degree reckless endangerment, and faces 25 years to life if convicted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The preparation for the Macy’s holiday windows has already begun in Red Hook. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The latest public work from Kehinde Wiley, known for President Obama’s portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, is Rumors of War a nearly 30-foot tall sculpture that is evocative of a confederate monument but instead features a young African-American male in contemporary clothes. (Time Out)

The L Train Slowdown will end by April 2020 rather than July 2020, three months earlier than scheduled. (amNY)

If you didn’t understand what was happening in the Tekashi69 court case, here’s the Old Gray Lady to explain it. (NY Times)

The City Council is looking into the impact of film shoots in residential neighborhoods and is considering a suite of bills to strengthen residents’ rights. (Bowery Boogie)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in the West Village. (The Infatuation)