The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 29, 2019 – The “A New Kind of New York City Nightmare” Edition

The city pays charities late, ICE arrests are up, Corey Johnson is running for mayor, Adulting 101, sports betting in New York, the governor needs a new phone, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

“The UES, where the players play, white men in khakis line up for Fairway.” (SNL)

If you love pain, this Bohemian Rhapsody karaoke bus seems like it might be up your alley. (Gothamist)

The FDNY rescued a woman trapped in an elevator since Friday. Congratulations on learning about your new city nightmare. (amNY)

The NYPL has an “Adulting 101” class for teens. Maybe if you ask nicely you can get in yourself. (NYPL)

Monday morning’s hellish commute was brought to you by a “weird noise” at Hoyt Schemerhorn. The MTA “understands your frustration.” (Gothamist)

How much do you think a one-time cleaning of a subway station is worth? (6sqft)

Our mature governor avoided a question about endorsing Mayor de Blasio’s potential presidential run by pretending his phone stopped working. (NY Post)

Will he endorse Pop-Tarts?

There’s a loophole in the zoning code that allows buildings to add “mechanical space” in the middle of the building to push the upper floors even higher. The details of floor area ratio and building design are boring and unnecessary to understand the city is ready to close the loophole. (Curbed)

Corey Johnson, the city’s current City Council Speaker and acting Public Advocate, is eyeing a run at mayor in 2021. (Gothamist)

The Child Victims Act passed the state’s legislature on Monday. The bill extends existing statutes of limitation for prosecuting child sex abuse against people and public and private institutions. The bill also allows victims who are outside the current statute of limitations one year to take civil actions against their alleged accuser. (amNY)

Sports betting might be a reality in New York state soon. (NY Times)

The Public Advocate special election’s candidates have gone from 23 to 20 to 11. The latest round of cut candidates didn’t raise the minimum amount of funds to qualify. (Gotham Gazette)

This is how Manhattan transit looked in 1899. It was dirty and overcrowded. Not much has changed. (Viewing NYC)

ICE arrests were up 1,700% at Brooklyn courthouses in 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

275 board members of top social services charities that provide shelter and services to the city’s neediest populations have criticized the mayor for the city’s late payments 91% of the time. (NY Post)

Kevin O’Brien, the former de Blasio acting chief of staff who was forced to resign after two women accused him of sexual harassment, had a history sexual harassment accusations. (NY Times)

30 outstanding coffee shops. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 25, 2019 – The “25% Faster Than Slow is Still Pretty Slow” Edition

Weekend subway change, Dunkin owns the city, a beer to pair with the L train, the Gowanus Canal flushes its sewage tanks, the 2021 elections, and more.

Here is a complete list of trains with no service changes or disruptions this weekend: G, L and Q. Everyone else? Better check the trains before you go anywhere. (6sqft)

The mayor wants to increase bus speeds by 25%. The average speed of an MTA bus is 8.4 mph. (Metro)

The Gowanus Canal cleanup is changing designs slightly from a pair of tanks to into a tunnel to catch the sewage flowing from Park Slope. Rather than two 6 million gallon tanks, it’ll be a one half mile long tunnel 150 feet underground that will hold 16 million gallons of Poop Slope. (Curbed)

The MTA board met to vote on a fare hike for March and they… opted to delay the vote. A fare hike seemed all but certain until the Governor announced that he is opposed to the fare hike. (NY Times)

311’s technology was put into place in 2003 and it hasn’t been updated since. That all changes this July. (Gotham Gazette)

A tale of two states. New York is split on the plastic bag ban, government sponsored health care and congestion pricing, but are unified in support of giving the police the authority to remove guns from violent people, legalizing marijuana and raising the age to buy cigarettes and tobacco from 18 to 21. (Legislative Gazette)

People are already entering the 2021 race for city comptroller. Early candidates are City Council Members Brad Lander and Helen Rosenthal. (Gotham Gazette)

This is a new reason for a subway delay. (@NYCTSubways)

Visualizing income taxes in NYC in 2018. (r/dataisbeautiful)

You find $90 on the ground on the subway. What do you do? (NY Times)

Take a look at the new Amtrak space in Moynihan Train Hall/the new Penn Station. (6sqft)

The third victim in the Sheepshead Bay Seaport Buffet hammer attack died. The alleged attacker was inspired by a movie about Chinese men mistreating women. (NY Post)

“Nice charter schools you got here. Shame if something happened to them.” The city’s school chancellor has some vague threats for charter schools. (NY Post)

Finally, the perfect beer to pair with trying to figure out the new L train closures. (Bedford + Bowery)

City Councilmember Ydanis A. Rodriguez is calling on the NYPD to put cases of confiscated electric bikes on hold, calling them biased against working people. (Metro)

The city is mobilizing the new NYPD unit aimed specifically at cars in the bus lane. Moving violations are up 612%. (Curbed)

The number of chain stores in Manhattan decreased in 2018, but one neighborhood bused that trend in a major way: The Lower East Side. Also a quick bit of trivia: Dunkin Donuts has the distinction of being the chain with the most locations in the city with 624. (Bowery Boogie)

Noticed the Shen Huen posters everywhere? So has Reddit. (r/NYC)

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