The Briefly for April 21, 2020 – The “Mayor de Blasio Wants You to Snitch” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All public events in June are canceled, the best Indian takeout and delivery options, the NY Times discovers studio apartments in quarantine and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

A pilot program to bring on-site health services and expanded COVID-19 testing to residents of NYCHA will roll out this week, according to Governor Cuomo. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The country’s most expensive sushi restaurant now has a takeout option to match. Masa is selling an $800 box of sushi or sashimi every Friday. It will feed four people and you have to assemble it yourself. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to snitch on your fellow New Yorkers for not socially distancing. “I’m sorry this is not snitching.” -Mayor de Blasio. On a serious note, report people or plaes that are promoting something that is creating an unsafe condition. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The mayor may not have the authority to close the schools or make rulings over the subways, but he does have the ability to cancel public events and Mayor de Blasio has canceled all public events in June. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The New York City LGBTQ Pride March: Canceled. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Shakespeare in the Park: Canceled. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Half Marathon: Canceled. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival: Canceled. Is this going to be a year without festivals in NYC? (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Coney Island Mermaid Parade: Postponed. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The federal government’s $350 billion funding for small businesses ran out last week, calling attention to larger businesses that received checks, like Shake Shack’s $10 million. Shake Shack announced it would be giving that $10 million back after public outrage was pointed in their direction. (Zachary Warmbrodt for Politico)

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, described as the third-best steakhouse in every second-tier city in America, has 150 locations, $86 million in cash reserves, and also received a forgivable $20 million loan from the federal government, making sure businesses who need those loans will never get them. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

How do you demolish a 52-story building in Manhattan? Very slowly. 270 Park Avenue’s 707-foot-tall building is being demolished to make way for a massive 1,425-foot-tall building. (Michael Young for New York YIMBY)

The NYC Human Rights Commission is launching a team to respond to COVID-19 discrimination and harassment, as reports of racism against Asians surge in the city. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s statistics are being criticized because a new hate crime category titled “Other Corona” hides the increase in biased-based attacked on the Asian community in New York. Multiple groups have stepped up to collect reports of harassment and racist incidents. (Ese Olumhense, Rachel Holliday Smith, Ann Choi and Christine Chung for The City)

It’s the size of a football and for $20, it can full of a mixed drink and yours with a straw. A refill is only $15. (EV Grieve)

The city opened five new COVID-19 “walk-in” test centers that will prioritize patients older than 65 with preexisting medical conditions who live in areas of the city that have been disproportionately affected by the spread of coronavirus. “Walk in” is in quotes because it’s not a drive-through test center. You still need an appointment to get a test. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Imagine the indignity of the choices that the 1% have to make in these very trying times. They have to choose between quarantining with their household staff or, get this, doing their own chores. (Dennis Lynch for The Real Deal)

Are you real for virtual dating? (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

Where to get Indian delivery and takeout. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If your neighbor tests positive for COVID-19, does your landlord have to tell you? There’s nothing that legally compels them to. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

I don’t think the New York that we left will be back for some years.”- Gregg Bishop, commissioner of the city’s small businesses agency. Thank you for your optimism Gregg. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The Times looks at New Yorkers self-isolating in studio apartments, including a couple paying $2,300 for a 237 square foot studio apartment. (Penelope Green for NY Times)

Welcome to New York Sabrina Ionesco, the first overall pick in the WNBA draft, who will be playing for the Liberty. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Food critic Ryan Sutton’s 15 favorite takeout and delivery options (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Xan for today’s featured photo of “Invisible Man: A Memorial to Ralph Ellison”.

The Briefly for January 9, 2020 – The “300 Defective Subway Cars and State of the State” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Legal weed, 12 bloody hours for pedestrians, the OMNY system is stealing fares, rent in Williamsburg hits an all-time high, the best bagels, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 34˚
Clear throughout the day.

Video: Watch the full State of the State Address. (NYGovCuomo on YouTube)

An overview of homeless funding, small business tax cuts, a “Restore Mother Nature” bond, and other proposals that could come from the speech. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

With the state legislature being in firm control of Democrats in 2019 and making real progress on Cuomo’s agenda, the governor was forced to find new material for this year’s speech. (Politico)

The state failed to legalize weed in the summer of 2019, could 2020 be the year? The governor called it an ethical imperative to legalize it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

During the speech, Cuomo called for labeling certain hate crimes as domestic terrorism, which is punishable by life in prison. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The governor is calling to end the “fraud” of the gig economy, comparing gig economy corporations to sweatshops and legislation could re-classify independent contractors as employees, similar to the recently passed (and challenged) California law. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

The Restore Mother Nature Bond Act, mentioned in the speech, would pump $3 billion into resiliency efforts across the state, city included. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that independent pharmacists said would protect them and patients against health care middlemen causing higher fees. The governor cited higher fees and anti-competition concerns in his message. (Gabe Herman for The Villager)

Governor Cuomo wants to ban repeat sex offenders from the subway. How? No one has an answer to that question and this is the second year in a row he’s expressed that desire. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The MTA pulled nearly 300 brand new-but-faulty subway cars from their tracks overnight on Tuesday for “repeated issues.” The cars represent 4.5% of the MTA’s fleet. These are the same cars that the MTA paid $600 million for and only received 18 on time and have since cost the city $35 million in repairs and $300 million in lost labor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The OMNY system celebrated its 5 millionth payment, but there’s more to this story. It seems that some scanners have been double charging unwitting riders. As riders scan their MetroCards, the sensitive scanners pick up the near field signal and also charge their credit cards. In order to fix this on an iPhone, disable “Express Transit Card” in your Wallet and Apple Pay settings. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

In a very MTA moment, someone managed to jump a turnstile in the middle of an OMNY press conference. (Bowery Boogie)

The MTA is being sued by Surveillance Technology Oversight Project (yeah, it spells STOP) to get information about a camera in the Times Square station installed to deter fare evasion. STOP believes the MTA is deploying facial recognition technology, but the MTA denies any facial recognition. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

46% of families living below the poverty line do not have broadband internet access as home. To alleviate this, the mayor announced an Internet Master Plan. It’s low on details, but the idea is the city will partner with private providers to expand the current infrastructure. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The LaGuardia AirTrain situation is a complete mess. If the AirTrain moves forward, it will be Governor Cuomo’s sheer force of will, and not what is the best actual option. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

Ever sine the L train shutdown was shutdown, rent in Williamsburg started creeping up and are now 26.7% higher and have hit an all-time high of $3,675/month. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

The city witnessed a 12 bloody hours as four pedestrians were killed or critically injured. A man was killed but he driver of a bus in Midtown, a 10-year-old boy and his mother were hit by a garbage truck and the boy was killed by the driver, and a 68-year-old woman was killed by the driver of a cement truck in Borough Park. 122 pedestrians were killed in 2019, up from 105 in 2018. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Mulchfest continues through January 11, so bring your Christmas trees to one of the 67 drop-off sites across the city to participate. (Gabe Herman for The Villager)

The best momo (Himalayan dumplings) in the city, ranked. (Joe DiStefano for Grub Street)

Phots: The vintage typewriters of the closed to the public Bankers Club on the 40th floor of the Equitable Building. (Michelle Young for Untaped New York)

2019 seemed like the year for Universal Healthcare in New York state. What happened? (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Stop buying books on Amazon and borrow them from the library. An arduous task, I know. Use Library Extension to make it easier, the Chrome and Firefox extension will tell you what books and audiobooks are available at the nearest libraries to you. Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Book Culture, the beloved book shop on the Upper West Side, suddenly closed due to owed rent payments. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Here’s a different kind of “world’s tallest.” The 707-foot tall 270 Park Ave is about to become the tallest building to be intentionally razed. chase has decided it wants a 70-story building there instead, nearly twice the height of the old building. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Renderings: See inside Peak, the 101st-floor restaurant coming to Hudson Yards. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Another food hall is opening in Midtown. Take a look at the 12,000 square foot Urbanspace, which will include Roberta’s Pizza, LoLo’s, Call Me Pasta, City Tamale, an Eisenberg’s sandwich shop, and more. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn Public Library’s Sheepshead Bay branch reopened Tuesday after a five-month closure. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Is the city’s healthiest neighborhood Midtown? (Emily Davenport for amNewYork)

Meet Dena Cooper, the artist transforming Alexander Jackson into Harriet Tubman on $20 bills. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

A look at The Duplex, the city’s longest running cabaret bar. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

The finest bagels of NYC, mapped. (Eater)

How the city’s bagel union fought off a mafia takeover. (Jason Turbow for Grub Street)

The Briefly for November 5, 2019 – The “Another Loss for Trump” Election Day Edition

Everything you need for election day, NYC has a new top cop, a Chicago-style bean is coming to NYC, the best French bistros and brasseries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Today is election day! (amNewYork)

Look up your nearest polling location.

Here’s what is on today’s ballot. (Patch)

A guide to the 2019 New York elections. (Politico)

Need more information about the charter questions? (Patch)

There will be extra language interpreters at 100 poll sites today, thanks to a lawsuit that the Board of Elections tried and failed to block in court. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court ruled that President Trump’s accounting firm must turn over his tax returns to New York prosecutors. The next stop for this case is the Supreme Court. (Huff Post)

A look at what the midtown skyline will look like with the addition of the new 707-foot tall 270 Park. (New York YIMBY)

Kiss announced 75 additional tour dates to their End of the Road farewell tour, with their last show in NYC on July 17, 2021. (Brooklyn Vegan)

With the help of the new Wegmans, the Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a record of 589 new hires in a year. This is the first time the Navy Yard surpassed 10,000 jobs in the 53 years the city has been operating it. (amNewYork)

Look, I don’t want to be the asshole that tells you about this for the first time, but it’s possible that we’re gonna see some snow towards the end of this week. (Patch)

Children under the age of two in car seats must be in rear-facing car seats, according to a law that came into effect at the beginning of November. (amNewYork)

Dov Hikind, a former state assemblyperson who advocated in favor of racial profiling by the NYPD, was against same-sex marriage, wore blackface to a 2013 Puris celebration, and was indicted on corruption charges while in office, will be unblocked by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter thanks to the settlement of a lawsuit against AOC. Can’t imagine why she blocked him, he seems like such a swell guy. (NY Times)

An interview with Drag Queen Marti Gould Cummings, candidate for City Council District 7 in 2021. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Say hello to the new First Avenue subway station entrance at Avenue A. (Curbed)

Police Commissioner James O’Neill has resigned. Dermot Shea, the chief of detectives, will be his replacement. (NY Times)

O’Neill’s three-years as commissioner were marred with the 2016 Chelsea bomber, multiple terror attacks, and a sharp rise in NYPD suicides, but he also issued a formal apology for the NYPD’s actions that caused the Stonewall riots and oversaw the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose chokehold led to the death of Eric Garner. (amNewYork)

Here’s what’s known about Dermot Shea, the next commissioner. (NY Times)

“At a time when the relationship between police and communities of color couldn’t be worse – we chose yet another white guy?” -Assemblyperson Catalina Cruz, who represents Jackson Heights, Elmhurst, and Corona. (Sunnyside Post)

The Briefly is a celebration of the news that comes from all over the city every day and from over 80 different sources. Sometimes I ignore a story like this, but I love seeing this type of reporting. Rite Aid installed self check out machines at their store in Carroll Gardens. If you know of a hyperlocal blog and you haven’t seen it linked here, please email it to me. (Pardon Me For Asking)

Student suspensions are down by 10.5% in the city’s schools this year. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There was madness at Popeye’s across the city on Sunday, as their chicken sandwich made its return. (Time Out)

Babe Ruth is known for his time with the Yankees, but a jersey from his season of coaching the Brooklyn Dodgers is up for auction. (Atlas Obscura)

We’re getting our own Chicago-style “bean” at 56 Leonard St. Unlike the Chicago version from the same artist, this one will be wedged into the base of an apartment building. (Time Out)

20 of the best French bistros and brasseries. (Eater)