The Briefly for October 9-10, 2020 – The “$75 Hot Dogs for People Who Hate Having $75” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Protests in Boro Park, another shutdown takes hold, the Trump Wall of Lies defaced, the MTA’s secret Money Train, & the everything pizza bagel

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 58˚ High: 76˚

Today is your last day to register to vote. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Bed-Stuy is the fourth coolest neighborhood in the world, behind Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong, Downtown Los Angeles, and Esquerra de l’Eixample, Barcelona, citing The Billie Holiday Theatre, Harold and Maude Vintage, and Peaches HotHouse while calling it the “greatest incubator of the future.” (Will Gleason for Time Out)

That didn’t take long. The Bushwick “Wall of Lies” from President Trump was vandalized with “Vote Trump or Die” and “Stand Back and Stand By.” (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reporter)

What abomination is this? Pizza with everything bagel crust. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

“Italy has one of the richest histories in Western civilization and was the birthplace of the Renaissance which gave us countless great thinkers, artists, scientists and the likes to choose from that didn’t cause the strife and crimes against humanity that Columbus is guilty of. This isn’t about rewriting history, this is simply about righting a wrong.”
-Ed García Conde, From The Bronx to Italian Americans With Love: It’s Time to Let Go of Columbus for Welcome2TheBronx

The MTA had an armored money train that traveled to a secret “money room” in Downtown Brooklyn as recently as 2006. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

“There is something here that needs to be fixed right away. And that’s why I’m being abundantly clear it will be fixed today and made public. Violence is unacceptable.” The mayor said a lot of words but provided no specifics of how policing was going to change on Thursday night. (Christopher Robbins and Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Meet Harold “Heshy” Tischler, who is running for City Council, had this to say about Chirlance McCray: “And if you think, Mrs. de Blasio…retard, woman, crook, whatever you are, you think you’re gonna get elected to borough president? You will not be elected.” This is disgusting and I suggest that Mr. Tischler apologize, end his campaign for City Council, and think long and hard about what it takes to be an adult. Mr. Tischler made these comments during a protest against new state-imposed restrictions due to a flare-up in Covid-19 cases in Borough Park. (Jocelyn Grzeszak for Newsweek)

In the second night of protests in Borough Park, Jacob Kornbluh, an Orthodox Jewish reporter, was chased through the streets and called “Nazi” and “Hitler” by a large violent crowd let by Heshy Tischler. Borough Park’s Covid-19 positive test rate was 10.6%. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

“This impending holiday would be less of a concern if ultra-Orthodox communities were universally following the city’s coronavirus guidance. But many of them are not. And while the responsibility for this conduct clearly rests foremost with them, the city has done everything it can to ensure that its entreaties go unheard and its declarations are rejected. This is not responsible governance, and it could cost people their lives.”
-Yair Rosenberg, There’s a Way to Avert the Looming Coronavirus Crisis in Hasidic Brooklyn. But the City Needs to Choose It Right Now. for Tablet

As you might expect, there is already a lawsuit claiming the state’s new Covid-19 shutdown is “unconstitutional.” (Georgia Kromrei with research by Orion Jones for The Real Deal)

“I understand it will be confusing to some to implement, but that’s because we’re not used to this kind of geographically tailored COVID plan.” -Dr. Jessica Justman, an epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health who argues the state’s plan is worth trying. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Here’s what is known about the city’s latest Covid-19 shutdowns. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The city released an interactive map to see if you fall within the boundaries of the vague zones drawn by the state. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

NYU passed the state’s threshold of 100 Covid-19 cases in 14 days, which should trigger a school to transition to all-remote learning. NYU will stay open. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

More than half of the city’s public school students are now enrolled in remote learning. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

With lease signings near pre-pandemic levels, it seems that the Manhattan “exodus” is slowing down. (Greg David for The City)

Photos: A look back in time at the Limelight. If you’re old enough and we in the city, you’ve got a few stories about wild nights at the Limelight. (Daniela Kirsch, photos by Steve Eichner for Patch)

Cringe-city, population” this video de Blasio made mocking President Trump. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Maya Wiley has made her mayoral hope official. Wiley is a former lawyer for the city and an MSNBC analyst. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Where to eat the Filipino dish sisig. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Video: Check out the Meatpacking District in 1993. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

Photos: October 4 was the Feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi, which means photos of animals getting blessed. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Yeah, you might know that Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux co-designed Central Park, but dig deeper and learn about Andrew Haswell Green, the driving force behind getting Central Park made. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Cy Vance Jr got the go-ahead from yet another judge to see President Trump’s tax returns. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

RIP Jim Dwyer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, columnist, and author. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

Photos: A look at Pier 55, the new floating park on the Hudson River. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If you need an uplifting story for your Friday, here’s how neighbors in Ditmas Park rallied to save Benji the cat. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

An interactive map with what’s open in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

The lawsuit was appealed as high as it could go, and the 21 artists in the lawsuit against the 5Pointz developer who destroyed their work in violation of the Visual Artists Rights Act will finally be awarded the $6.75 million they are owed. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The Standard High Line Hotel is selling a $75 hot dog. $75!!! (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Terri for today’s featured photo of Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine’s installation at the Prospect Park Bandshell.

The Briefly for July 21, 2020 – The “Don’t Make Me Turn This Car Around” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Night and weekend subway construction returns next month, Domino Park gets private security, the new owner of Ample Hills, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Humid throughout the day.

Video: Walking through Occupy City Hall. (Action Kid)

Apartment Porn: A $4 million townhouse in Windsor Terrace with an inground saltwater pool. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Reducing service, slashing the transit workforce, scrapping planned infrastructure improvements, raising tolls beyond scheduled increases, and some of the other “hard choices no matter what happens” at the MTA over the next few years with a projected $16 billion loss. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The pandemic is making more New Yorkers consider buying cars. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

There’s never been a better time to have contactless payment on the subways. OMNY is available throughout the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

It feels like we haven’t heard anything about subway closures for construction in forever, but here we are. The F line’s Rutgers Tube, which connects Brooklyn and Manhattan, will close nights and weekends starting in August through the spring to finish Hurricane Sandy repairs and fortification. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo is going full-on “don’t make me turn this car around” when it comes to bar and restaurant openings. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Mayor de Blasio saw the video of a homeless man being punched in the face by an NYPD and decided that everyone and no one is to blame for the situation continuing his longstanding tradition of never taking a stand on anything and upsetting everyone on every side of every situation. A true ally to nobody. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Pulling the enforcement of the city’s Open Streets away from the NYPD and asking community partners to take over was supposed to make things easier. Now, the NYPD are harassing volunteers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Apparently asking that the NYPD stop beating and killing New Yorkers is too much to ask if you’re NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

“The NYPD demands accountability from everyone but themselves. The Department refuses to require personnel to attend virtual misconduct hearings or provide body camera footage to investigators. Officers without masks beat masked demonstrators on video, after weeks of sometimes-violent mask-wearing enforcement, then insisted that more cops were essential for public safety.”
– Maryanne Kaishian, senior policy counsel at Brooklyn Defender Services, Cops continue misinformation campaign to smear policies they don’t like for Brooklyn Eagle

The widely cited and incorrect talking point of a politician who is trying to convince their constituents that using tax dollars to pay for a sports stadium is beneficial for the neighborhood. The Yankees received $1.186 billion in public money and tax breaks to build their new stadium in 2009. Eleven years later, the Yankees pay no property taxes on an estimated $5 billion of city-owned land, the Bronx will not see any baseball fans in 2020, and the neighborhood surrounding Yankee stadium is economically dying, with the average merchant behind on rent to the tune of $60,000. This year, the Yankees signed pitched Gerrit Cole for $324 million. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Deep in the city’s budget is 4.1 million dedicated to supporting people involved in the sex trade, but what does that even mean? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

An interview with Brian Nagy, an NYC teacher in the school system’s remote teaching pilot program that says remote learning may, in some form, be here to stay. (Gabrielle Birkner for Chalkbeat)

What to expect in phase four. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The FDNY had to save two people whose inflatable swan drifted into the East River and began sinking. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Jerry Wolkoff, the man best known as the developer that demolished 5Pointz. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The 7 best hikes near New York City. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

RIP Nina Kapur, CBS2 reporter who died after a moped crash in Manhattan. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Interview: Michael Zapata, the new owner of Ample Hills on why a guy who manufactures precision lasers in Oregon just bought an ice cream company in Brooklyn. (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse with an “enchanted garden” backyard, six fireplaces, and private parking. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sheldon Silver, the former New York State Assembly speaker, is going to prison for 78 months after being convicted on corruption charges. (Benjamin Weiser and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Why the hell does Domino Park, a public space, have private security guards posted at its entrances? (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group restaurants are ending their move towards no-tipping policies. Meyer believes tipping contributes to inequitable pay, wage instability, and other problems. He says he’s ending the policies because “guests want to tip generously right now.” That’s extending a lot of trust, considering it’s not his income he’s making policies about. (Julia Moskin for NY Times)

The president is threatening to send federal agents to the city to “keep this city safe.” We have heard some awful ideas this year, each dumber than the last, but I can’t ever imagine this ending well. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The William Vale’s pool is now open to the public with the price tag starting at a hefty $75 for a few hours and going up to $500 for two people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Check out this wonderful pen and ink cityscape from artist Kaylie Fairclough. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A call for Mayor de Blasio to shut off the lights so the city can see the comet Neowise. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Wait times for results for Covid-19 tests across the city are slipping. The free tests available at the city’s publicly run hospital network are beyond the advertised 3-5 days and are drifting towards the two-week territory. (Anastassia Gliadkovskaya for The City)

Attention mallrats: Indoor malls are still closed. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

A deeper look at the temporary hospital that was built at U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which cost $52 and treated 79 patients. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Where to eat dim sum outdoors in Chinatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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