The Briefly for August 27, 2019 – The “End the Gifted Programs to Desegregate the City’s Schools” Edition

This winter will be a tough one, a ghost kitchen haunts Soho, the 7 train destroys a morning commute, officials want answers about the BQE and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Why can’t New York be a modern city? The answer lies in the billion-dollar fiefdoms controlled by city and state agencies and can be illustrated by a simple dog walk. (New York Mag)

Another person was killed by a driver on Coney Island Avenue. A 40-year-old man was lying on the sidewalk near a parking garage when he was run over by someone pulling into the garage a little after midnight on Monday. This is the fourth person killed on or near Coney Island Avenue this year. (Streetsblog)

This week marks the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn, the first battle of the Revolutionary War. Ten spots to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

A panel of experts has a recommendation on how to end segregation in the city’s schools: close all the gifted programs. (NY Times)

If you’re someone who keeps a spreadsheet of the best food in Chinatown (I know more than one person who does this), strike Yee Li, formerly New Big Wang, from the list. After 33 years on the corner of Elizabeth and Bayard, the restaurant is closed but lives on in spirit at the family’s new restaurant, New Yee Li, on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Brooklyn.

Surprise! A broken rail on the 7 train ruined Monday morning’s commute on the 7, E, M, F and R trains. (Gothamist)

Photos and more photos from Afropunk (Gothamist and Brooklyn Vegan)

If you’re wondering what’s going on with the replacement of the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade, you’re not alone. Multiple city and federal officials signed onto a letter looking for answers from the Department of Transportation. (Curbed)

A ghost kitchen is coming to Soho. Zuul, literally named after Zuul the Gatekeeper of Gozer from Ghostbusters, will house multiple restaurants who will only offer delivery. Sweetgreen, Junzi, Sarge’s, Naya, Stone Bridge Pizza & Salad, and POsitive Foods have already signed on. There is no restaurant, only Zuul. (Eater)

The Farmers’ Almanac has made their predictions for winter 2020 and you’re really gonna hate this. “With colder-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast and above-normal precipitation expected, our outlook forewarns of not only a good amount of snow, but also a wintry mix of rain and sleet—especially along the coast.” They are also predicting an extended winter and a slow start to spring. (Patch)

Today is PSL day in Starbucks across the country, but get ready for the Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew, the latest abomination destined for success. (Grub Street)

The Kosciuszko Bridge will open on Thursday, four years ahead of schedule, and bring with it pedestrian and bike lanes. (Curbed)

A state Supreme Court Judge upheld the state’s ban on religious exemptions to vaccinations for all children in public or private schools, put in place after the measles outbreak this year. The plaintiffs plan to appeal the decision. (Gothamist)

Arthur Schwartz, the lawyer leading the legal arguments against the 14th St busway who likened people protesting him to “white hooded zealots,” has compared Jane Jacobs’ fight in the ’60s against Robert Moses to his fight against “our millennial version of Robert Moses” Polly Trottenberg. Trottenberg, who graduated from Barnard College in 1986 and is not a millennial. (The Villager)

Statues for Equality by Gillie and Marc bring statues of ten women to Sixth Avenue on the anniversary of women getting the right to vote. (Untapped Cities)

Despite the president’s tweet that the federal government is working to extend the Q train to 125th St, nothing has been done by the Trump administration to prove his words remotely true. (6sqft)

Why do some buildings allow roof access and some do not? (Street Easy)

The overall number of overdose deaths in the city is down, but the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan all saw increases. Rates are down among black and white New Yorkers but are up among Latinos. (amNY)

Taylor Swift’s “Cornelia Street” on her new album mentions the townhouse she rented in Greenwich Village. Take a look inside. (Curbed)

Would you believe that the NYPD Detective Darryl Schwartz, who is being sued for allegedly making bogus DWI arrests in order to earn extra overtime, has a history of misconduct? (Gothamist)

Anyerson Delacruz-Rosario was arrested in the Dominican Republic for his part in trafficking hundreds of thousands of packets of heroin and fentanyl to New York City. (Patch)

The lawsuit against the Central Park West bike lane appears to be in jeopardy as the building who filed the suit is facing internal challenges against it and possibly violated state law with the filing. (Streetsblog)

A tribute to the 99 cent pizza slice in the form of a new mural by City Kitty. (EV Grieve)

The best lunch spots in Midtown. (Thrillist)

Thanks to Baily Crawford (@blycrawford) for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 23, 2019 – The “Can No Longer Get Away With Murder” Edition

NYC’s students are still less than 50% proficient in English and math, 15 restaurants to BYOB, Di Fara reopens, the Museum of Ice Cream find a home, and more in today’s NYC news digest

This weekend’s scheduled subway disruptions look minimal on the surface, but the 1, 2, 3 and 5 trains are still taking a big hit. (Subway Weekender)

The Times is starting to take guesses as to when the mayor finally ends his joke of a presidential bid. (NY Times)

The Museum of Ice Cream is getting a permanent home in Soho on Broadway this fall. Get your Instagram accounts ready. (Curbed)

The NYC Police Benevolent Association’s response to the Daniel Pantaleo firing, who caused the death of Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, is to tour the city’s precincts to say that “no one has our backs,” circulating photos of James O’Neill saying he’s “wanted for killing the NYPD,” and posting in a message board for police officers called the “Law Enforcement Rant” calling Eric Garner’s family “savages” and “ghetto dwellers.” It’s like they no longer think they can get away with murder at their jobs. (Gothamist)

There used to be a bowling alley in the basement, the secret top floor bar, and more secrets of the Jane Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Keens in Midtown is wallpapered with history, with newspaper clippings, photos, playbills, etc on display all over the steakhouse. Until recently, that history included about 10 pieces that featured racist stereotypes. Nothing will put a hamper on your night like finding out your “thumbs up” photo with your steak also featured a large “rival darkies” minstrel show ad in the background. (Eater)

A venomous snake went missing two weeks ago in the Bronx Zoo’s “Jungle World” exhibit. It’s still missing. (Bronx Times)

A man was crushed to death by an elevator in Kips Bay in an elevator that was ordered to be shut down in May by the Department of Buildings. (NY Times)

Billionaire’s Row residents tried to take the mayor up on his offer to do “anything” to rescue the Di Fara pizzeria by offering to pay Di Fara’s tax bill if the mayor would stop a homeless shelter from opening in their neighborhood. (Patch)

No need, because Di Fara reopened on Thursday afternoon. (Grub Street)

NYC student achievement is rising, but still, only 46% of the city’s third through eighth-graders passed the state’s math exam and only 47% passed the English exam. Both numbers are up from last year, but both fall short of the city’s 50% goal. (NY Times)

The 7 train continues to drop debris from its elevated tracks in Queens. This time it was a piece of metal the size of a brick that luckily avoided hitting anyone. The MTA has installed netting as part of a pilot program in some areas of the 7 train, but clearly not in enough locations. (Gothamist)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge is scheduled to open next month, four years ahead of schedule. (Sunnyside Post)

The Department of Homeless Services announced a joint operation between DHS and NYPD in an effort to offer services and not punishment to the city’s homeless on the subways. (Curbed)

Next month the MLB FoodFest brings foods from every Major League Baseball stadium to Midtown. You won’t have to go to Texas to get the dilly-dog: a hot dog stuffed inside a pickle and fried like a corn dog. (amNY)

The top 15 restaurants where you can BYOB. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 23, 2019 – The “Maybe Hackers Can Run the Subways Better” Edition

The In-N-Out Burger mystery, the city’s power outages continue, the subway commuting disasters continue, in pursuit of the perfect ice cream sundae, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Department of Sanitation’s trash museum is only available to be seen once a month when Nelson Molina, the man behind the collection, gives tours, but a few hundred items of the collection is on display at the East Harlem Gallery as part of the “What is Here is Open” exhibition. (Curbed)

The MTA’s proposed express F service is, surprise surprise, opposed by the neighborhoods that don’t have express stops. (Brooklyn Paper)

Transit President Andy Byford hasn’t said what caused Friday’s monumental screw up with the subways, but he has said that it was not the result of outside tampering. At this point, maybe Russia can run our transit system better than the people in charge. (amNY)

Another day, another commuting nightmare. Monday night’s 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains were mostly out of service in Brooklyn fur to faulty signals. Combine that with a storm that provided limited transportation alternatives and it’s just another day on the subways. (Gothamist)

The closest In-N-Out Burger to NYC might be in Texas, so how did a pristine Double-Double end up on the street in Jamaica, Queens? (QNS)

The Department of Education says that they “successfully completed remediation work” or removing lead from the drinking water at many Bushwick schools, but three schools are showing higher levels of lead in the drinking water after the work was complete. (Bushwick Daily)

How far would you go to protect your view? The residents of a building in Chelsea bought the air rights to a neighboring property for $11 million so their views of the Empire State Building remained disturbed. (Curbed)

Photos from Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake. (Untapped Cities)

A new city council bill with 22 co-sponsors will fine businesses $1,000 for not accepting cash or charging cash-paying customers more, with a few exceptions, if it is approved. (amNY)

I am the left.” The governor has never been shy about talking shit when it comes to his fellow Democrats. (NY Times)

Despite their performance as of late, including the sky-lighting incident in Astoria and the pipe-explosion in Flatiron, ConEd wants to raise its rates for electricity. What do they think they are, the MTA? (The Indypendent)

50,000 New Yorkers were without power on Sunday and as of Monday morning, there were still 19,000 that were left in the dark. A portion of the blackout was intentionally caused by ConEd in a supposed attempt to prevent wider outages. (Curbed)

The mayor is calling for an investigation to whether the city needs a new entity to provide electricity. The governor has already made direct threats towards replacing ConEd. (Politico)

Why did ConEd choose the neighborhoods that it did in Southeast Brooklyn to intentionally blackout? What was it about Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, and Canarsie made them different than Park Slope, Sunset Park, Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, or Dumbo to have their power intentionally shut off? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you lost power, you can fill out a form on ConEd’s website to get some money back. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

In pursuit of the perfect sundae. (Grub Street)

10 suggestions to fix the lighting in your dim apartment. (Street Easy)

Declawing cats is officially illegal in New York state. Technically “declawing” is an amputation surgery which removes the first bone of the cat’s toe and also takes with it tendons and muscles. Unnecessary declawing carries with it a fine. (Gothamist)

Remember the 7 train’s falling debris problem? Never ones to be accused of anything that has the appearance of being timely, the MTA is finally testing new netting to prevent future impalings of anything that dares travel below a 7 train. (amNY)

Ever wonder what a manhole explosion looks like? Here’s a video. (Greenpointers)

The attorney general’s office is invoking the “Son of Sam Law” to prevent the Soho Grifter Anna Sorokin’s profit off the sale of her life rights to Netflix. The Son of Sam Law prevents offenders from profiting off their crimes. (Gothamist)

If you had to do your job using faulty video conferencing systems, you’d be frustrated. If your job was a court interpreter at immigration hearings, it’s orders of magnitude larger than simple frustration. (Gothamist)

Two lawsuits have accused the governor of trying to diminish their power by changing the state’s fusion voting system. (NY Times)

15 secrets of The Frick Collection. (Untapped Cities)

The first report from the federal monitor in charge of overseeing the city’s lead problems in NYCHA developments isn’t very encouraging. (amNY)

The state is considering banning the sale of your phone’s location without your express permission. The bill will be introduced on Tuesday. (NY Times)

“Where should we eat?” says your friend/family member/rando on the street who is visiting New York for the first time. Suddenly you freeze because your collection of restaurants that you visit regularly don’t seem adequate for someone visiting for the weekend and may never return. The first timer’s guide to eating in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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