The Briefly for April 24, 2019 – The “14th Street Will Be Closed to Cars” Edition

“Grab a cop’s taser” is still a bad idea, the 14th St bike lanes will be permanent, Shirley Chisholm’s statue design was unveiled, the Charging Bull’s balls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The design for the Shirley Chisholm statue at Prospect Park has been selected. Artists Amanda Williams and Olalekan Jeyifous’s design is the first of five She Built NYC monuments announced. (Women.nyc)

Finally, some decision about 14th St during the L Train Slowdown. Starting in June, 14th St will be closed to traffic from 3rd Ave to 9th Ave. In addition to 14h St, the bike lanes on 12th and 13th will be made permanent. Maybe this is in hopes of softening the blow of just how rough it will get for commuters. The MTA is already warning that even if you allocate extra time to your journey on the L train once the Slowdown takes hold, you probably won’t make it on the first train anyway. (amNY)

Federal immigration trial attorneys refuse make the 1.1 mile trip between Federal Plaza and the new immigration courtrooms on Varick St and are choosing to appear via video conference instead. (Gothamist)

Cardinal Timothy Dolan announced an affordable housing portfolio with 866 apartments across six developments in the city. (Bronx Times)

There are bad ideas and then there are “grab a cop’s taser and zap three NYPD officers” bad ideas. (Gothamist)

Over fifteen years since it was set up, the makeshift memorial for 9/11 victims in the Union Square subway station is beginning to show its age. (Untapped Cities)

It’s shocking just how bad the city’s procedures can be for the people affected by lead paint. Local Law One was the city’s promise to end lead poisoning by 2010. Even with a spotlight shone by WNYC/Gothamist, the city’s Housing Preservation and Development failed the city’s residents while their children are poisoned by their homes. (Gothamist)

Two NYPD officers are being investigated for the police’s response to the horrific ax murder and attempted murder in the Bushwick Houses. (amNY)

If laying in the sun under JFK’s busiest runways, the TWA Hotel’s pool and observation deck are right up your alley. (6sqft)

A love letter to the MTA’s R-46 subway cars, the ones with a faux wood interior, orange and yellow seats, and have been in service since the mid-70s. (Gothamist)

Those newly $3.00 expensive MetroCards could win you an all-expenses-paid vacation to Hawaii if you buy one of the quarter million qualifying cards at specific subway stations. Once you have a card, you have to remember to register it online and a single winner will be chosen next month. Good luck. (Gothamist)

The SummerStage lineup was announced. (Time Out)

59% of New Yorkers support having a homeless shelter in their neighborhood. It seems the NIMBY opposition to shelters appears to be the minority. (Patch)

Watch this hypnotic animation showing how the L trains will operate during the Slowdown. (@NYCTSubway)

NYC’s recycling program’s mascots finally have names and OH MY GOD WHAT ARE THOSE THINGS. (amNY)

Planned Parenthood of New York City’s Project Street Beat is bringing a mobile health center which will offer HIV testing, overdose prevention, counseling, and other services in an attempt to expand coverage to marginalized communities. (amNY)

Two new ax-throwing bars are coming to Brooklyn. Just when you thought Brooklyn couldn’t get more Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

The average commute to work in the city is 43 minutes, the longest of any large American city. Just another way to show that NYC is #1. Only 4% of New Yorkers can get to work within 30 minutes. (Patch)

Go to Bowling Green and you’ll see two lines of people waiting to take photos at the Charging Bull. One by the bull’s head and the longer line are of people looking to snap a photo of themselves rubbing its balls. Why? (Atlas Obscura)

Shanghai has its own Charging Bull, but in contrast, no one is rubbing its balls. (Business Insider)

The five best cakes in the city.

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for October 24, 2018 – The “Evict Madison Square Garden in 2023” Edition

Fact checking the Molinaro/Cuomo debate, the 2020 census problem, Amazon is opening a cashless store to Manhattan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Watch Tuesday’s debate between Governor Cuomo and Marc Molinaro. (CBS) Fact checking and five takeaways from the debate. (NY Times)

How to vote. (Special Projects)

Is it possible for New York to evict Madison Square Garden in 2023? (Gothamist)

Amazon is opening an Amazon Go store in Brookfield Place near the World Trade Center, which is Amazon’s “no cash, no checkout” stores. What could go wrong? (Tribeca Citizen)

Get ready for a wet, wet, wet Halloween. (NY Post)

The Proud Boy who threw the first punch and triggered the fight on the Upper East Side was 26-year-old Maxwell Hare. The NYPD is conducting a criminal inquiry into the SPLC designated hate group Proud Boys. (Gothamist)

11 additive buffalo wings in the city. (Eater)

As more storefronts become empty throughout the city, something will have to be done. The Small Business Jobs Saving Act was a potential solution, but despite the backing of city council, the mayor is dead set against it and he has the backing of the Real Estate Board of New York. (Gothamist)

There are still hints of the original Penn Station sprinkled throughout the nightmare that sits underground on 34th St. (Curbed)

A tour of the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s New York City. (Vanity Fair)

The 2020 census presents a problem for the city and Brooklyn’s 2.6 million people to be specific. Without proper reporting, the city won’t receive proportional funding or representation in Congress, but proper reporting could put undocumented residents in danger. This is where #MakeItCountBrooklyn comes in. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This isn’t how an ambulance is supposed to find people who need to go to the hospital. (NY Post)

The Staten Island Ferris Wheel is dead. (Curbed) If you’re looking for puns, go no further than Rachel Holliday Smith on Twitter.

Another Brooklyn College professor is in trouble for what he posted online. This time it’s Dr. Rohit Parikh, who posted an anti-Latinx screed on Facebook. Students are demanding sensitivity training and a boost in funding to latino student groups. (NY Post)

The city has granted unlimited sick leave to workers who contracted illnesses from working at Ground Zero after 9/11. (amNY)

How the 1919 “Black Sox” World Series was fixed on 73rd and Broadway. (6sqft)

If everyone who thought James Dolan was an asshole wasn’t allowed into Madison Square Garden, it would sit empty every single night. (Observer)

What happened to the fire extinguishers in subway cars? (@s_nessen)


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for October 8, 2018 – Rats Coming Out of Our Drains and Other True Horrors

The Central Park zombie raccoon outbreak spread to Prospect Park, a private ferry to deal with the L train shutdown, Sharon Needles is ready for Halloween, and more in the daily NYC news digest.

We all have enough to worry about before we add “rats coming out of the drains” to the list, but here we are. (Curbed)

The sky is literally falling at the Bedford Ave L station, but the MTA says not to be alarmed by the chunks of debris form the ceiling. (Gothamist)

The zombie raccoon outbreak in Central Park has spread to Prospect Park. Late stages of distemper can cause brain damage and cause raccoons to wander aimlessly and become aggressive. Pet owners are advised to be alert and keep your pet leashed at all times. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 72nd St B/C subway station reopened with mosaics by Yoko Ono. (6sqft)

It’s cuffing season, and Bushwick Daily is here for you. A list of budget-friendly romantic date spots in Bushwick.

An $80 million renovation is headed for the Manhattan Bridge and will continue through 2021. (6sqft)

The 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund is in danger of running out of funds before the program ends in 2020. Anyone who lived, worked, or studied south of Canal is urged to register with the fund even if you haven’t been diagnosed with a 9/11 related illness. (Downtown Express)

Meet Concetta Anne Bencivenga, the new director of the New York Transit Museum. (6sqft)

Norwood Heights is expected to be NYC’s hot neighborhood…in 50 years. (Welcome2TheBronx)

“I never thought I would live in a time with such constant outrage and what the country is going through now.” Deborah Kass’s OY/YO sculpture was created in 2015, which seems like an eternity ago. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The ice skating rink at 30 Rock opens today. It’s been on your NYC “to do” list for years, right? (6sqft)

Get your eye roll ready. SW/TCH is a private 150 person luxury ferry that will operate during the L train shutdown. (Gothamist)

The Department of Justice dropped its case against Pablo Villavicencio, the man who was detained by ICE at Fort Hamilton earlier this year.

17 cozy bars and restaurants in Cobble Hill. (Eater)

How the brownstone became the city’s classic apartment. (StreetEasy)

No matter the situation, the mayor saying “I’m in the middle of doing my workout” to a homeless advocate is a bad look. (HuffPo)

“With so much in the news about sexual misconduct in the past week, you may find yourself facilitating discussions on the topic.” John Jay distributed guidelines for teaching students about its own sex scandal. (NY Post)

Sharon Needles’s annual Halloween show starts this week and she sat down with Chelsea Now to talk about her annual Halloween traditions, favorite costumes, the future of drag, and more.


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.