The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 31, 2020 – The “Panda Express, You Will Be Missed” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The USNS Comfort arrives in NYC, on the edge of a rent crisis, NYPD changes enforcement tactics, neighborhood delivery and takeout directory, and more

Today – Low: 39˚ High: 47˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Remember the field hospital in Central Park? Well, the group is led by Franklin Graham, a notorious anti-LGBTQ and Islamophobic preacher with a track record of using humanitarian missions to proselytize an evangelical agenda. He’s also the guy that said that God intervened in the 2016 election to make Donald Trump president. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Welcome to the resistance, Mike Francesa. (Ed Mazza for HuffPost)

The Empire State Building’s “heartbeat of America” display really freaked some people out. (Ed Mazza for HuffPost)

Looking to up your baking game? Christina Tosi of Milk Bar is hitting Instagram every day at 2 pm for a distanced baking club. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Farewell, Panda Express. Panda Express closed all 11 NYC locations temporarily “out of advanced precaution.” The company will pay employees impacted by the closure and gave away the rest of its food to hospitals before it closed. (Serena Dai for Eater)

WeWork is in the running for “worst possible COVID-19 reaction.” They haven’t closed their rental offices, they’re trying to entice workers to come in with a daily $100 bonus, are continuing to collect membership fees, and fired 250 employees. WeWork is claiming that since some businesses that rent from them are essential, they should remain completely open. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan and E.B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

Photos: The city’s closed streets. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio called for a rent freeze on the one million rent-stabilized apartments in the city. (Michael Dogan for LIC Post)

We’re a day away from the first of the month and rent strikes are beginning to come forward as a path forward. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Once the 90-day eviction suspension, what’s going to happen? Mass displacement? (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Who the hell are these monsters who are getting together for coronavirus speakeasies and potlucks? (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Workers in Amazon’s Staten Island fulfillment center walked out today at 1 pm and called for the facility to be shut down after they say at least 10 workers have tested positive for COVID-19. Amazon fired Chris Smalls after the walkout, one of the organizers of the walkout, for supposedly violating safety regulations. (Josh Dzieza for The Verge)

Whole Foods workers are planning a nationwide sick-out protest on Tuesday. Workers are calling for increased hazard pay while the company reaps record sales. (Lauren Kaori Gurley for Vice)

The Onion: New York City Health Officials Board Up Sun To Discourage Large Groups From Gathering Outside. (The Onion)

13% of NYPD officers are out on sick leave. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The NYPD can now give tickets for a lack of social distancing at their own discretion. Enforcing the law at their discretion fairly isn’t exactly the NYPD’s strong suit. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

86-year-old Janie Marshall was attacked on Saturday at NYC Health and Hospitals/Woodhull in Bed-Stuy for not socially distancing by a 32-year-old woman. Unfortunately, Janie hit her head on the flood after being attacked and was pronounced dead a few hours later. If you see someone doing something dangerous, use your words and keep your own distance. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Shortly after Edge opened in Hudson Yards, a worker was diagnosed with COVID-19. Edge closed, but the adjacent Peak restaurant didn’t. The VP of the operating company told the managers of Peak to not tell guests about the reported case and lie about why Edge was closed. (Erika Adams for Eater)

How the Long Island Rail Road is working to keep its customers safe, from Phillip Eng, the president of the LIRR. (Phillip Eng for QNS)

How’s the MTA’s subway cleanups going? “It looks good on paper, but in a lot of cases, it’s not happening.” -JP Patafio, a vice president for TWU Local 100. (Jose Martinez for The City)

12 epidemics that have plagued New York throughout history. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The USNS Comfort hospital ship arrived in New York City Monday morning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: The USNS Comfort arrives. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

What kind of stupidity is necessary to watch a hospital ship arriving, sent to relieve the hospitals during a pandemic that has killed over a thousand New Yorkers, and idiots watching the ship arrive en masse to take photos? (@kirkpate)

Video: Trucks are being used at hospitals across the city as makeshift morgues, but it might not hit you of how dire the situation is until you see a hospital staff using a forklift to transport bodies into a truck on a sidewalk. Watch at your own discretion. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

This hand-drawn map of the Met by artist John Kerschbaum is absolutely stunning. (Claire Voon for Atlas Obscura)

RIP Father Jorge Ortiz-Garay, the first-known Catholic priest in the city to die of COVID-19. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The favorite NYC restaurant cookbooks of the Eater staff. (Eater)

FEMA is sending refrigerated trucks to the city to serve as temporary morgues as the death toll from the coronavirus grows. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

NYPD will no longer respond to 911 calls for vehicle collisions on Staten Island that result in only property damage because people in Staten Island can’t stop hitting each other with their cars and too much of the police’s time is being spent on providing loss adjustment services for the insurance industry. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What to expect when you’re expecting to give birth during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Catherine Pearson for HuffPost)

How to shop for groceries, according to doctors and epidemiologists. (Marian Bull for Grub Street)

Video: Drone video of Hart Island, New York City’s mass grave, containing over one million bodies. (Find and Seek)

82 percent of New York City voters approve of Cuomo’s handling of the pandemic, according to a Siena College poll. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Air purifiers can’t kill the coronavirus. New York Attorney General Letitia James is ordering companies selling purifiers to cease and desist marketing their products as being effective against COVID-19. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The case for why jails are so important in the fight against COVID-19. (Anna Flagg and Joseph Neff for NY Times)

360° Video: Driving through Chinatown, Little Italy, and the Bowery. (ActionKid)

What the BrooklynVegan staff is listening to in isolation. (BrooklynVegan)

The neighborhood delivery and takeout directory. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Kathryn for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 30, 2020 – The “Buying Whiskey for a Good Cause” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Central Park becomes a field hospital for COVID-19 patients, Amazon continues to expand its NYC footprint, you can still move apartments, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 48˚
Drizzle in the morning and afternoon.

Can you move during the pandemic? Yes. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In September of 2018, a construction crew in Elmhurst accidentally exhumed the mummified remains of a smallpox victim from the 1850s. Was that a bad omen? (Ephemeral New York)

The New York Bacon and Beer Classic was rescheduled to September 26. Isn’t it nice to think that life will return to normal at some point in the future? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Wheated is selling off its whiskey collection to help its laid-off employees. If you were looking to get your hands on some great whiskey at a reasonable price in Ditmas Park, you know where to go. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Maybe whiskey’s not your thing? Some restaurants have merch available. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The definition of what consists of a “real emergency” has changed. With a record volume of 911 calls, the FDNY is asking anyone who is thinking of calling 911 for coronavirus-related reasons to call a doctor first. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

Photos: Inside the new 1,000-bed Javits Center hospital. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Aqueduct Racetrack, the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, the CUNY College of Staten Island, and the New York Expo Center will become temporary hospital sites that will add an additional 4,000 hospital beds to the city. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Central Park’s East Meadow is being used as an emergency field hospital for COVID-19 patients. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Elon Musk is sending 615 ventilators to the city, wait, why did Elon Musk have 615 ventilators to start? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Ample Hills is laying off all 101 of its workers. This, unlike their recent bankruptcy announcement, is related to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

Photos: New York’s first complete week of pandemic dining. (Gary He for Eater)

It started as a list of the best things to eat in New York, now it’s a list of 101 things we hope we can eat again soon. (Grub Street)

Here are all the Michelin-rated restaurants in the city that are now offering takeout or delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted a pet, there is quite literally no time like the present to adopt one. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The bars are closed, the restaurants shuttered, the gyms are barren, but there is a place for some New Yorkers to be social and remain physically distant: the stoop. (Doug Gordon for Curbed)

Con Ed suspended checking gas and electric meters, so if someone comes to your door claiming to be from Con Ed, ignore them. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The state has put an end to “non-essential” construction, limiting active construction to building hospitals, infrastructure projects, affordable housing, and homeless shelters. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

The Empire State building is working with Z100 to put together a light show every night at 9pm with new shows debuting on Friday nights. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

So how did the first week of remote learning go? (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

Add the New York Philharmonic to the list of organizations streaming free performances. Check out past performances on Thursday nights. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s first map with any COVID-19 information is exceptionally unhelpful. Par for the course from the de Blasio administration. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Amazon bought the Lord & Taylor Building at 424 Fifth Avenue for one billion dollars. Amazon continues to expand its NYC footprint, despite not getting a ridiculous tax break from the city and state. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

Photos: Turns out we’re still pretty bad at social distancing in city parks. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The NYPD was authorized to give $250 – $500 fines to people who aren’t maintaining social distance, but only if they fail to disperse when ordered or if officers find people in the same place twice. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Pregnant women will not be forced to give birth without having someone with them. A new executive order from Governor Cuomo breaks any ban that was previously put in place by hospitals. It’s amazing how quickly the government can move when it is motivated. (Katie Van Syckle and Christina Caron for NY Times)

The state’s tax deadline and the presidential primary were moved. The tax deadline to July 15 and the primary to June 23. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Along with the presidential primary, local elections were moved, creating questions about how the elections for Queens borough president and open city council seats. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte and Christine Chung for The City)

One week after calling for a complete lockdown of the city, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for the city to close all parks and playgrounds. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Over the weekend, Rhode Island restricted access to the state for New Yorkers and then lifted their restrictions after Cuomo threatened to sue. (Bill Mahoney for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the “new” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is starting to appear much more like the rest of the democrats than her previous spitfire self. (Alex Thompson and Holly Otterbein for Politico)

A brief list of notable people who have tested positive for COVID-19 this weekend: MTA Chairman and CEO Pat Foye, Knicks owner James Dolan, Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz. All three are isolating and seem to be doing okay. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro, Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro, and Erin Durkin for Politico)

17 Thai delivery and takeout picks. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Dylan for today’s featured photo in Domino Park, which accurately captures how we’re all feeling.