The Briefly for September 13 – 14, 2020 – The “A Bat Is In Your Home. What Do You Do?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The UWS hates the homeless, the 1st Covid-19 school shutdown, the Village Halloween parade is canceled, reactions to indoor dining, & more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said a vaccine would need to exist for nearly a year before people might feel comfortable returning to theaters unmasked, which he said would likely be mid to late 2021. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Flying military planes over NYC on 9/11 is pretty high on the list of 2020’s stupidest ideas and 2020 is a banner year for stupid ideas. It was canceled on request of the city after Mayor de Blasio admitted he didn’t know it was happening. That guy really has his finger on the pulse. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Village Halloween Parade is canceled. It was inevitable yet still sad. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

167 CEOs and corporate bosses wrote the mayor an open letter, asking him to take action on crime and quality of life issues or else “people will be slow to return.” It was signed by the CEOs of Lyft, Warby Parker, and the WNBA among others. Not only is their message extremely deaf to the moment, but they are also asking the mayor to be a leader, which is something he has proven he’s not. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The letter is 242 words and of these business leaders “need to send a strong, consistent message that our employees, customers, clients and visitors will be coming back to a safe and healthy work environment.” These are economic descriptions of people, not how you talk about your family, friends, and neighbors. These millionaires do not offer support for a city that is facing an economic crisis, they demand action from someone else. They want everyone to come back to their offices but haven’t said how they’ll protect us. They want our support for their cause but use the language of the president when describing our streets. (J. David Goodman, Emma G. Fitzsimmons, and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Upper West Siders banded together and hired a lawyer to expel the “scum,” “trash,” and “thugs” in their neighborhood. On Facebook, they discussed an armed uprising and how they could use wasp spray and dog shit against them. They hung a noose outside of where this “scum” was living. They even convinced the mayor to move them. Who was their enemy? Homeless New Yorkers. (Gwynne Hogan and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor’s decision to remove 300 homeless New Yorkers from a shelter on the UWS has cascading effects that will force 900 New Yorkers in shelters to be moved to accommodate the change. The personal stories of the city treating people like objects that can easily be moved around are heartbreaking, but at least those people on the Upper West Side are happy. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The Legal Aid Society has plans to sue the city over the “knee-jerk capitulation” over the ejection. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

There are bats in all five boroughs. Here’s what to do if a bat gets into your home. Step one: Impossibly, stay calm. (Christopher Mele for NY Times)

A senior advisor to Chancellor Richard Carranza, Alison Hirsh, has resigned her post from the Department of Education. She left the mayor’s office in June after the NYPD’s treatment of Black Lives Matter protesters. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s the story of how a 19-year-old in federal custody ended up hiding behind a loom in someone’s apartment in Sunset Park. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

SNL is returning on October 3. There’s been no word on guests, hosts, or audiences. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Abeda Khanam, a teacher at Robert F. Wagner High School in Long Island City, for being named state Senator John Liu’s Woman of Distinction for 2020. (QNS)

Local Law 1932-A suspends enforcement of the personal-liability provision in commercial leases of COVID-impacted tenants and it’s set to expire on September 30, but City Council has plans of extending it through March of 2021. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: The Trump Statues Initiative, which is bringing “living performance pieces” to the city’s streets, like “The Final Push” which features a “gold” President Trump in a golf cart being pushed by Laura Ingram and Sean Hannity over headstones. (Untapped New York)

NYC is now home to the world’s first-ever Makeup Museum. It’s now open with its debut exhibition “Pink Jungle: 1950’s Makeup in America.” (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea posted a photo to Twitter of the top brass of the NYPD and officers openly violating the state’s mask and event mandates at an indoor gathering with over 50 people inside police headquarters. The mayor called it “a mistake that needs to be rectified going forward.” (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A stroll through Pomander Walk, the city’s most exclusive street. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I Love NY is looking for volunteers to give foliage reports each week. Leaf peeper wanted! (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Education confirmed there were 19 positive Covid-19 tests in city schools among teachers with two in one school, triggering an automatic 24 closure. Students don’t return until September 21. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look at Chloë Bass’s outdoor art exhibition “Wayfinding” in St. Nicholas Park. (Brian Boucher for NY Times)

A look at an unlikely for crime detterance: More pools. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

“Even with these ongoing concerns, expanded outdoor dining is … nice. Freed of these unnerving matters, expanded outdoor dining would be almost unthinkably pleasant. The fact is, for an ad hoc system that was initiated to help New York’s restaurants survive, expanded outdoor dining works remarkably well.”
-Alan Systma, Let’s Just Make Expanded Outdoor Dining Permanent for Grub Street

Indoor dining returns at a 25% capacity on September 30, but that alone will not save the restaurant industry. A look at what 25% looks like and interviews with several restauranteurs about what business looks like for them going forward. (Ben Yakas with additional reporting by Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

“The 25% is not going to buy us very much at all.” Paul Giannone, owners of Paulie Gee’s and Paulie G’s Slice Shop. Restaurants react to the return of indoor dining. (Hannah Albertine & Chris Mohney for The Infatuation)

Learn about Elizabeth Jennings: The NYC teacher who desegregated NYC transit. (Jerry Mikorenda for Atlas Obscura)

Apartment Porn: What’s a solarium? This $1.6 million East Village condo has a solarium. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to eat outside in Fort Greene. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The state’s Department of Labor has announced that an extra $300 in weekly federal pandemic unemployment benefits will start hitting bank accounts as soon as next week. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Trump administration has secretly siphoned nearly $4 million away from a program that tracks and treats FDNY firefighters and medics suffering from 9/11 related illnesses. (Michael McAuliff for Daily News)

When the headline is enough: Thoughts on the politics and possibilities behind the MTA’s Doomsday budget proposal. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave. Sagas)

Photos: A Red Phalarope found its way to Stuyvesant Cove Park on Saturday morning. It’s a rare sight in the city for birders and for the rest of us, it’s a cool little bird. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

The ten best fried chicken sandwiches in NYC. Yes, the Popeye’s sandwich made the list. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

Note from Rob: Thursday’s article about NYPD Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack was written by Joaquin Sapien, Topher Sanders, and Nate Schweber and co-published with ProPublica and included reporting and analysis from The City.

The Briefly for June 8, 2020 – The “I Guess This Is Phase One?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase one kicks off today, the mayor is forced to lift the city’s curfew early, the MTA’s plans for phase one, a protest of the mayor, and more

Are you absentee voting this month? (You should be absentee voting this month.) Here’s how to make sure your absentee vote counts. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

The absentee ballot deadline was extended to June 23. Get your application in now. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here we go, phase one. Here’s what it means. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The mayor announced he would end the city’s curfew one day early because, according to him, there had been a night without violent protests. In the reality that the rest of us live in, a lawsuit from the NYCLU, the Legal Aid Society, the Thurgood Marchall Civil Rights Center, and the Center for Constitutional Rights were about to force the mayor to lift the curfew and three different district attorneys in the city refused to charge most protestors that were arrested. (Ali Tufan Koc and Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A protest of the mayor is expected on Monday morning (or was expected, depending on when you read this) to push de Blasio into actually enacting police reforms. The march, which includes members of the mayor’s administration, isn’t organized by the same people who wrote the open letter tot he mayor, but it shows how unified the city is in its disgust over the mayor’s ability to talk a lot and do very little. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

As Minneapolis already has, activists are calling on the NYC Department of Education to cut ties with the NYPD. Chancellor Richard Carranza, appointed by the mayor, does not favor a “counselors not cops” approach to school safety. Since 2014 the school safety budget has increased by 25% and while the school budget for next year is decreasing under the budget already revealed by the mayor, the budget for safety is increasing. (Alex Zimmerman for The City)

What can the city do with the NYPD’s $6 billion? Quite a bit. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Thursday night’s NYPD ambush of peaceful protesters was, according to Commissioner Dermont Shea, “executed flawlessly.” It included beating and arresting legal observers, medics, pepper-spraying a pregnant woman, and featured Terence Monahan kneeling with protesters one moment and directing officers to arrest the protest’s leaders the next. The NYPD claimed that “interlopers” were to blame for the police violence but a video of what happened shows otherwise and the NYPD has yet to show any evidence of this. (Jake Offenhartz and Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A look at the NYPD’s strategy of “kettling” protestors, which shows a shift in police tactics towards aggression. Of course, the mayor has defended this practice, saying it is sometimes necessary for public safety. I’m not sure which public he’s referring to. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Does the name Terence Monahan ring a bell? It should because he was the person in charge of the city’s response to protesters during the 2004 GOP convention. In 2004 the protesters had been told they could march and were then arrested en masse. Charges were dismissed against all 227 arrested. The city later settling a lawsuit with the protesters for $18 million. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Terence Monahan has a legacy of brutality. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Governor Cuomo announced a “Say Their Name” package of bills which would criminalize making a false race-based 911 call, ban chokeholds, revise 50-1 (unknown what this means), and assign the Attorney General an independent prosecutor for matters related to the death of unarmed citizens caused by law enforcement. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The state’s Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus has their own package of 13 bills they’ve unveiled which also adds mandates for body cameras for state and MTA police, establishes strangulation as a crime mandates medical attention for people under arrest, and more. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

We’re committed to seeing a shift of funding to youth services, to social services, that will happen literally in the course of the next three weeks, but I’m not going to go into detail because it is subject to negotiation and we want to figure out what makes sense.” -Mayor de Blasio, talking big, one more time. He says “literally in the course of the next three weeks” because it literally has to get done because of the city’s budget, not because he wants to enact reforms quickly. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Two NYPD officers were suspended for violence against protesters. One is the officer who pushed a woman to the ground and the other the officer who pulled down a protester’s face mask and pepper-sprayed him. Just two. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Next, suspend every cop who covered their badge number during the protests with the bullshit excuse of the covers being “mourning bands.” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: East Village storefronts show their support for Black Lives Matter. (EV Grieve)

In comparison, the award for “the shittiest tribute to victims of racial violence” goes to the Museum of Ice Cream’s “I Scream For…” painted boards. (Elie Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Returning to the subways today? Here’s what you need to know. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The MTA clearly has a plan for people who will be riding the subway. It may not be a perfect plan, but it’s a plan. The mayor? Come on, you know he doesn’t have a plan based in reality. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

“This week and going forward, you might notice some other helpful additions to your local station — like new hand sanitizer dispensers and new signs reminding you how to keep yourself safe. You’ll also see floor markings, floor decals, and new directions aimed at communicating with you clearly about how to safely move around our system.
-Sarah Feinberg, acting President of MTA New York City Transit for amNewyork Metro, MTA is glad to have you back for the NYC reopening

With June 8’s phase one reopening of the city, you might be asking a few questions that are closer to home, like “will my building’s gym/pool be opening soon?” Get ready for a complicated road back. (Joanne Kaufman for NY Times)

The city will begin testing sewage for Covid-19, to get an idea of how the virus is spreading hundreds or thousands of people at a time. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into a law that will grant death benefits to Covid-19 frontline workers’ families. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A peek into what remains of Park, a Chelsea restaurant that abruptly closed last year and appears to be slowly taken over by trees. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

If you’re like me, at this point in the summer you’d have ridden the Coney Island Cyclone multiple times. If you’ve been missing the anticipation of the climb of the first hill and the exhilaration of the drop, these 360° videos of the Cyclone and Thunderbolt are gonna be as close as we can get for a while. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Last Wednesday night the city’s known Covid-19 death toll hit 0 for the first time since March 12. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

James Bennet, who oversaw the editorial pages of the NY Times, is out. The paper blames it on “a significant breakdown of our editorial process” because of the Senator Tom Cotton editorial which promoted violence against protesters. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

RIP Kanela, a red-headed Siberian husky and the unofficial mascot of Welcome2TheBronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

In 1982, the MTA thought they could paint their cars brilliant white to prevent them from being spray painted. “The Great White Fleet” idea was as stupid as it sounds. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

A bit of news that passed by in the insanity that was Memorial Day weekend and every single day since then, the City Council banned the use of the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” on official city documents. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Central Park West’s mystery manhole cover. (Ephemeral New York)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse in Prospect Heights with outdoor space, amazing woodwork, and one of the most wildly-colored bathrooms I’ve ever seen. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A list of lists: A roundup of NYC’s Black-owned restaurant lists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Thank you to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!