The Briefly for September 30, 2019 – The “14th St Busway has Risen from the Dead” Edition

The one impeachment holdout in New York’s delegation, the best pizza on the UWS, Battery Park City’s green dog poop, it’s gonna be a hot hot week, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are pretty rough, so check the routes before you go anywhere late. (Subway Weekender)

Summer is stretching into this week with temperatures predicted to hit 90 degrees on Wednesday. (Patch)

The only Democrat in the House of Representatives not calling for the impeachment of the president is Staten Island’s Max Rose. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cuomo wants it both ways when it comes to the impeachment. (Patch)

The 14th St subway is back and may even start as early as this week. (Streetsblog)

Battery Park City is going to compost the dog poop at its dog runs. (Tribeca Citizen)

The Dayspring Church, built in 1924 on Roosevelt Island, will become a speakeasy restaurant. (Eater)

The best pizza slice shops on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

If you’ve got $118 million, you can buy yourself two penthouses in the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

Protest sleep-outs in City Hall Park have existed since 1985. The protests have been suspended since 2012 due to Mayor de Blasio’s promises to alleviate the situation, but last week the protests began anew. (Gothamist)

The worst commuter train in America is in New Jersey. Ha! (NY Times)

Meet the 92nd Street Y’s new chief executive Seth Pinsky, the head of the Bloomberg administration’s economic development arm. (NY Times)

In celebration of the graffiti-tagged subway cars of the city in the 70s. (Gothamist)

It’s illegal for trucks to idle for more than three minutes. If you report idling trucks, you could get a reward. (Greenpointers)

There are new deadlines for voter registration in New York. You can change your party enrollment until February 1 to vote in the April presidential primary. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Legal Aid Society is raising money to help pay for fees associated with green cards, visas and other documents that give immigrants legal status. Help your fellow New Yorkers. (Patch)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortex is joining the calls for a bailout of the city’s taxi drivers, calling their plight “indentured servitude.” (NY Times)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health is pretty tame compared to most weeks. (Patch)

Korey Johnson, the man who allegedly ran down and killed a cyclist in Brooklyn with his SUV, was charged with second-degree murder, first-degree reckless endangerment, and faces 25 years to life if convicted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The preparation for the Macy’s holiday windows has already begun in Red Hook. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The latest public work from Kehinde Wiley, known for President Obama’s portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, is Rumors of War a nearly 30-foot tall sculpture that is evocative of a confederate monument but instead features a young African-American male in contemporary clothes. (Time Out)

The L Train Slowdown will end by April 2020 rather than July 2020, three months earlier than scheduled. (amNY)

If you didn’t understand what was happening in the Tekashi69 court case, here’s the Old Gray Lady to explain it. (NY Times)

The City Council is looking into the impact of film shoots in residential neighborhoods and is considering a suite of bills to strengthen residents’ rights. (Bowery Boogie)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in the West Village. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

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The Briefly for February 5, 2019 – The “Goose-Related Subway Delays” Edition

A possible CBD ban, State Senator Michael Gianaris could end the Amazon HQ2 deal, State of the Union protests, the hardest job in NYC, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at two of the State of the Union protests planned across the city. (amNY)

There were some goose-related delays on the Q train on Monday afternoon. (NY Post)

The 9/11 Memorial & Museum will add a section in May dedicated to people who died or became ill with 9/11-related illnesses. (Curbed)

10x TONY award winning “The Band’s Visit” will end its Broadway run on April 7. (NY Times)

The state saw an unplanned $2.3 billion drop in income tax revenue, which will force the state to curb spending. In some parts of the city, that’s called an “Amazon sized hole.” (NY Post)

New York City’s lack of cash crops ended slavery. In 1790, African Americans accounted for over 30% of Brooklyn’s population and most were enslaved. (Greenpointers)

10 new art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Hope. Love. Utopian. Finding optimism on city streets. (6sqft)

A rundown of the wave of laws that followed new blue wave in the state’s legislature. (NY Times)

A 72-year-old cyclist was killed in a hit-and-run while riding in the bike lane on Eight Avenue at 45th St. It was the second cyclist death in three days. (Gothamist)

The state’s Public Authorities Control Board isn’t well known, but it could kill the Amazon HQ2 deal. The state senate appointed the anti-Amazon Senator Michael Gianaris to sit on the board, of which any of the three members can veto the project. (The Real Deal)

Get your CBD-infused food and drinks now, because the Department of Health may be banning its use as a food additive. (Eater)

Jennifer Irigoyen, 35-year-old real estate agent and fitness instructor, was stabbed to death in her Ridgewood apartment building around 1am on Sunday night. Irigoyen a was five months pregnant and no arrests have been made. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit calls the conditions at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are a “a humanitarian crisis,” according to a lawsuit filed by the Federal Defenders of New York. (Gothamist)

The arguments for and against landmarking the Strand Bookstore. (West View News)

The city is moving to fire the security officer who pulled Jazmine Headley’s 1-year-old son from her arms at a Brooklyn benefits center in December of last year. A second officer has resigned. (NY Post)

Clothing and accessories by cat people for cat people to promote feral cat awareness. Yes, they’re in Bushwick. How’d you know? (Bushwick Daily)

A man with MS-13 affiliations was arrested in connection to the shooting on the 90th St-Elmhurst Avenue 7 train platform. (NY Times)

The City Council is considering a foie gras ban. (Gothamist)

Is Netflix’s “Russian Doll” an allegory for Tompkins Square Park? (Gothamist)

After the first day of deliberations, the jury has not come to a verdict in El Chapo’s trial on day one. (amNY)

A 16-year-old 92nd Street Y camp counselor says she was blacklisted after she accused an older counselor of sexual assault. (NY Post)

If you thought your job was hard, meet Pete Tomlin. As NYC Transit’s new modern signal chief, Tomlin is responsible for modernizing 90% of the subway’s signals. Good luck Pete, you’ll need it. (amNY)

15 restaurants that “feel like Japan.” (Eater)

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