The Briefly for January 17, 2020 – The Weekend “El Bloombito Will Not Be Bought!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The 7 train announements are now sponsored, the mayor delays on filling his MTA board seats, mystery gumball machines appear on Avenue A, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 31˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 25˚ High: 38˚

As part of an ad campaign for a new show, Awkwafina recorded announcements for stops on the 7 train. The MTA considers this a pilot program for future campaigns. There are, of course, jokes. These jokes might be funny the first time you’ll hear them. Maybe even the second or third time, but when you’re late for work because the brand new signals on the train have failed because of a light dusting of snow, hearing a joke about 69-ing might be the thing to finally send you over the edge. Of course, this is assuming you can hear the announcements at all. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New Yorkers, of course, have opinions on the advertising campaign. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Video: Hear the announcements for yourself. (ActionKid)

@ElBloombito will not be bought! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How to order a bagel, even if your order is wrong. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

The full Governors Ball lineup was announced for June 5-7 on Randall’s Island. Tickets go on sale today at noon. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

10 best places to work remotely in NYC. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

A guided walk through Brooklyn Heights to Cher’s house in Moonstruck, Love Lane, Truman Capote’s house, and other neighborhood highlights. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Behold: The Hot Milkman. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Carlos Beltran “stepped down” from his job as manager of the Mets as a result of his involvement as one of the major contributors to the 2017 sign-stealing Houston Astros. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Review: The Carnegie Diner, which opened this week across the street from Carnegie Hall, puts a trendy twist on the classic diner menu. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Details are beginning to emerge about Yayoi Kusama’s “KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature” exhibition at the New York Botanical Garden this summer. Paintings, sculptures, and the artist’s signature Infinity Rooms will be a part of the exhibition in what will surely be the Instagram hit of the summer. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

What are these mystery gumball machines on Avenue A? (EV Grieve)

A coalition that includes attorneys general in 14 states, the District of Columbia and New York City are suing the Agriculture Department over a plan to impose stricter work requirements on millions of food stamp recipients. (Catherine Boudreau for Politico)

If Uncut Gems was your type of movie, the Safdie Brothers released a short starring Adam Sandler about two street performers in Times Square called GOLDMAN v SILVERMAN. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Domino Sugar Refinery is a literal shell of its former self in the first step of its transformation into an office building. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

Thursday ended a horrific 24 hours in Brooklyn as three pedestrians were killed by motorists. The first killed by the driver of an SUV in the crosswalk in Clinton Hill, the second killed by the driver of a private sanitation truck in Bensonhurst in a hit and run, and the third killed by the driver of a bus after she fell out of the bus and was subsequently run over by it. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Snowy Village could bring corn dogs back in trend in the city with a Korean take on the classic beach food. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Who is to blame for these deaths? If you listen to Police Department Deputy Chief Charles Scholl of Patrol Borough Brooklyn South, the pedestrians killed should have been more “careful.” (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

A Long Island woman died Thursday after a sheet of plywood blew off scaffolding and struck her in the head. Xiang Ji, 67, was fatally struck by the plywood which fell from a building on Main Street near 41st Road in Flushing. No one asked Deputy Scholl if she was careful enough. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Congrats to ROLLN in Flatiron for creating the world’s largest nigiri sushi, weighing in at 70 pounds. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

41 percent of all New York City schools — 755 in total — are more segregated than their neighborhoods according to a new report from the Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Eagle)

A new installation in collaboration with MoMA in the 5th Avenue/53rd Street subway station shows off the history of mass transit’s iconography and signage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is in-unit laundry the ultimate NYC apartment amenity? (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Fearing the state’s $6 billion deficit, the mayor unveiled a city budget with the smallest percent increase during his tenure as mayor. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

NYCHA’s heat outages are still abysmal, but they’re already much better than last year. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

As Barneys completes its slow march towards retail death, workers haven’t received information about a closing date, severance pay or benefits. (Sapna Maheshwari for NY Times)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to unveil a proposal to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters in New York state at his budget address next Tuesday. (NY1)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t filled his two MTA board appointments that are vacant and won’t before next week’s first two board meetings of the year. Good thing he has time to tweet about make believe bagel orders and chime in on memes about seating on subways, but can’t fill vacancies that have been open since June and November. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best cocktail bars in the city. (Sarah Probst for Thrillist)

The Briefly for May 1, 2019 – The “Wouldn’t We All Love to Ban Tour Guides With Groups” Edition

ApplePay comes to the MTA this summer, Tony Award nominations are in, the Dept of Education is accused of failing to protect students from sexual assault, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The mayor’s “Turning the Tide on the Homeless” program is facing criticism in a new report from the Coalition for the Homeless. The city’s homeless population has grown by 10% for each year Mayor de Blasio has been in office. January was a record-breaking year for the number of men, women, and children spending each night in a shelter at 64,000. (Gothamist)

The list of Tony nominations are in. This year’s big winner is “Hadestown” with 14 nominations. (NY Times)

A new lawsuit filed this week accuses the NYC Department of Education of failing to protect students against sexual assaults, file official complaints, conduct proper investigations, and support survivors dealing with trauma. Legal Services NYC filed the lawsuit on behalf of four girls aged 12 to 18. (Gothamist)

The National Park Service took an action on Liberty Island that most of us wish we could take anywhere we need to go: banned tour guides. (NY Times)

The Essex Market opened in 1940 at the behest of Mayor Fiorello Laguardia. This May the market’s original location closes to move across the street. (Untapped Cities)

“The one that I almost leapt over the counter to get was a quesadilla panino.” Eater’s weekly sandwich column from Robert Sietsema got a bit intense. (Eater)

Coney Island is getting another music venue, located in the center of the Coney Island Art Walls. “Amuse” will have a capacity of 4,000 and have programming between Memorial and Labor Day. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking to make an appreciable change in the city, the charter review process is your opportunity. (Curbed)

Was the body found under the Verrazzano Bridge an NYC Marathon runner? The body under the Verrazzano was one of two bodies found in the city’s waters last weekend. (Gothamist)

An Absolut Ban. An executive order from the mayor put the kibosh on newsstands, bus shelters, and LinkNYC alcohol ads, sponsorship or branding. The city doesn’t expect to lose any revenue as a result of the ban. (Patch)

What’s going on with the hundreds of “unfounded” rape cases in Queens? The 14.2% of reported rapes in Queens being unfounded is significantly higher than the city’s other boroughs. (QNS)

The problem with the city’s plan to divert L train riders to the J and M trains is that the J and M trains are just as reliable as they’ve ever been. Overnight Monday a switch problem brought both train lines to a halt, effectively turning the L train slowdown into a full-on East River shutdown. (Gothamist)

Today is the anniversary of the Empire State Building’s opening in 1931. A piece of trivia to unlease on unsuspecting people in your life. (GVSHP)

Speaking of trivia… tonight’s the night for JOHN TRVIALTA at Parklife:

Amazon is still coming to Queens but in the form of a new distribution center in Woodside. (The City)

Bronx Councilmember Andy King was accused of sexual harassment for the second time in two years. King is refusing to cooperate with the City Council. (Patch)

Billionaires’ Row is missing something significant. Billionaires. Nearly half of the apartments are unsold, including some buildings seven years old that remain half empty. (Curbed)

Take a look, because there are new renderings of Brooklyn’s Wegmans. (6sqft)

The Queens Library got a six-month extension on their Court Square lease to remain in the building through March 31, 2020. (LIC Post)

The NYPD found a new way to make biking or walking over the Brooklyn Bridge a nightmare. (Streetsblog)

What’s that tree outside your building? There’s a map for that. The New York City Street Tree Map is the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street trees. (Viewing NYC)

The art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

Nomiki Konst is under fire for questionable practices and payments during her Public Advocate campaign and is accused of being a “plan from the right.” You’d be forgiven if you couldn’t remember her or her campaign, she only garnered 2% of the vote. Konst’s campaign manager came forward about questionable donations, which were publicly matched, and even more questionable invoices. Konst has attempted to distance herself from the potential scandal, but she served as her own treasurer, which makes her legally responsible for her campaign’s financial system. (Politico)

Soon your apartment may be powered by poop! No, we’re not talking about your roommate. (Gothamist)

An appellate court upheld the city’s measles vaccination mandate on Monday, denying a request for a temporary restraining order by a group of anti-vaxxer parents as the number of confirmed cases in New York City rose to 423. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With all the measles talk going around, you’re not alone if you’re wondering if you should get yourself a booster shot as an adult. (NY Times)

Story update. Remember how the Board of Elections put all the city’s voter rolls online for anyone to look at? Well, that’s over. The BOE realized that maybe posting all of our names, addresses and party affiliations online wasn’t the best idea. (NY Times)

The MTA will begin support for ApplePay in the “early summer,” as the OMNY system is scheduled to go live on some 4, 5, and 6 train stops on May 31. (Engadget)

The latest city landmark debate is over Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of popular music. The conversation made a surprising turn towards some of the racism expressed in songs created there. (Curbed)

The “NOT GONNA SUCK YOUR DICK” graffiti tag is getting attention. (Bowery Boogie)

Featured walk: The essential Upper West Side. (GoRoam)

Where to go if you want to eat a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

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