The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Briefly for March 4, 2020 – The “Worst Restaurant in NYC Right Now” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on the spread of coronavirus in NYC, Robert Durst’s trial, the best pho, Spike Lee vs James Dolan escalates, another L train meltdown, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 53˚
Clear throughout the day.

Can you name every NYC location in the new Dirty Projectors music video? (Dirty Projectors)

The city’s master plan for the Sunnyside Rail Yards calls for the creation 100 percent affordable housing with 12,000 homes, 60 acres of new open space, equitable home ownership opportunities, the long-sought Sunnyside Station and necessary infrastructure and other public amenities on a publicly controlled site equal in size to Roosevelt Island or six times the size of Hudson Yards. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Here’s what’s happening and what you need to know with the city’s crackdown on food delivery apps. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

It was once thought to be the foundation of a Seneca Village house, turns out it was just a sandboxed from the 1930s. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The headline is enough: Salt Bae Burger Is The Worst Restaurant In NYC Right Now. Beautiful. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The NY Post used a photo of an Asian man in Flushing, Queens to accompany its article about a confirmed case of coronavirus in Manhattan. While nothing the NY Post does should surprise us any longer, they keep finding ways to exceed even our very low expectations. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

A second positive case of coronavirus in New York was found in a lawyer in Westchester with offices on East 42nd Street and whose children attend a Jewish high school in Riverdale. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The private SAR Academy/High School in North Riverdale yeshiva has been closed as a precautionary measure to prevent further spread. (NY1)

You’ve got questions about coronavirus, here are answers from the mayor and infectious disease professor at Albert Einstein College in the Bronx. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know if you have fears of coronavirus on the subway. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The Department of Education attempted to show compassion to parents and students about coronavirus-related school absences and only managed to make things worse and more confused when it comes to what absences would be excused or if students with other illnesses wouldn’t have their absences excused. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

State Sen. Brad Hoylman wants to make it illegal for businesses to double or triple the prices for hand sanitizer, face masks and other medical products as New Yorkers hoard supplies during the coronavirus outbreak. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

How to prepare your home for a pandemic. (Localize.City)

There are a disproportionate amount of media professionals living within proximity of the Park Slope Food Coop and as a result it receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Here is your requisite Park Slope Food Coop members are overshooting because of the coronavirus article. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

From 2013: “We’ve Reached Peak Park Slope Food Coop Mockery.” (Jen Doll for The Atlantic)

The MTA has a long and storied history of being sued over subway accessibility. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

You saw “The Jinx” on HBO, here’s what you need to know about the trial of Robert Durst. (Charles V. Bagli for NY Times)

The L train had another morning commute meltdown on Monday. Cool. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

RIP Matvey Natanzon, a.k.a. Falafel the Backgammon King. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

The MTA is not allowing workers to wear masks during their shifts to try to prevent the public from freaking out. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There might be no one that loves the Knicks more than Spike Lee, and even he announced after a run-in with owner James Dolan he won’t be attending any more games this season. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“I’m not leaving.” Angry Spike Lee is all New Yorkers. (@espn)

New York City is challenging a ruling by a State Supreme Court judge that would reduce the height of a 51-story Upper West Side condo tower. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

If you are waiting for your $100 Global Entry refund after New Yorkers were booted from using the program, you’re not alone. Refunds were supposed to be processed “automatically” on February 6 and everyone is still waiting. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A 10,350-square-foot, 17-room $28.5 million duplex on the Upper East Side, a discount since the last time it was listed. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Don’t go pointing toy guns from any rooftop in the city. You will be arrested like this guy from Brooklyn. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The company behind the installations of the LinkNYC kiosks owes the city tens of million of dollars, hasn’t installed nearly the number kiosks they promised, and has come up short of advertising money. The city is considering suing the company to enforce its contract.

New York could be the first state to adopt a Crash Victims Bill of Rights. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

28 top spots for pho. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thank you to the dedicated reader who wanted to remain anonymous for today’s featured photo at Lenox and 125th.

The Briefly for January 17, 2020 – The Weekend “El Bloombito Will Not Be Bought!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The 7 train announements are now sponsored, the mayor delays on filling his MTA board seats, mystery gumball machines appear on Avenue A, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 31˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 25˚ High: 38˚

As part of an ad campaign for a new show, Awkwafina recorded announcements for stops on the 7 train. The MTA considers this a pilot program for future campaigns. There are, of course, jokes. These jokes might be funny the first time you’ll hear them. Maybe even the second or third time, but when you’re late for work because the brand new signals on the train have failed because of a light dusting of snow, hearing a joke about 69-ing might be the thing to finally send you over the edge. Of course, this is assuming you can hear the announcements at all. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New Yorkers, of course, have opinions on the advertising campaign. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Video: Hear the announcements for yourself. (ActionKid)

@ElBloombito will not be bought! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How to order a bagel, even if your order is wrong. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

The full Governors Ball lineup was announced for June 5-7 on Randall’s Island. Tickets go on sale today at noon. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

10 best places to work remotely in NYC. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

A guided walk through Brooklyn Heights to Cher’s house in Moonstruck, Love Lane, Truman Capote’s house, and other neighborhood highlights. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Behold: The Hot Milkman. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Carlos Beltran “stepped down” from his job as manager of the Mets as a result of his involvement as one of the major contributors to the 2017 sign-stealing Houston Astros. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Review: The Carnegie Diner, which opened this week across the street from Carnegie Hall, puts a trendy twist on the classic diner menu. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Details are beginning to emerge about Yayoi Kusama’s “KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature” exhibition at the New York Botanical Garden this summer. Paintings, sculptures, and the artist’s signature Infinity Rooms will be a part of the exhibition in what will surely be the Instagram hit of the summer. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

What are these mystery gumball machines on Avenue A? (EV Grieve)

A coalition that includes attorneys general in 14 states, the District of Columbia and New York City are suing the Agriculture Department over a plan to impose stricter work requirements on millions of food stamp recipients. (Catherine Boudreau for Politico)

If Uncut Gems was your type of movie, the Safdie Brothers released a short starring Adam Sandler about two street performers in Times Square called GOLDMAN v SILVERMAN. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Domino Sugar Refinery is a literal shell of its former self in the first step of its transformation into an office building. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

Thursday ended a horrific 24 hours in Brooklyn as three pedestrians were killed by motorists. The first killed by the driver of an SUV in the crosswalk in Clinton Hill, the second killed by the driver of a private sanitation truck in Bensonhurst in a hit and run, and the third killed by the driver of a bus after she fell out of the bus and was subsequently run over by it. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Snowy Village could bring corn dogs back in trend in the city with a Korean take on the classic beach food. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Who is to blame for these deaths? If you listen to Police Department Deputy Chief Charles Scholl of Patrol Borough Brooklyn South, the pedestrians killed should have been more “careful.” (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

A Long Island woman died Thursday after a sheet of plywood blew off scaffolding and struck her in the head. Xiang Ji, 67, was fatally struck by the plywood which fell from a building on Main Street near 41st Road in Flushing. No one asked Deputy Scholl if she was careful enough. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Congrats to ROLLN in Flatiron for creating the world’s largest nigiri sushi, weighing in at 70 pounds. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

41 percent of all New York City schools — 755 in total — are more segregated than their neighborhoods according to a new report from the Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Eagle)

A new installation in collaboration with MoMA in the 5th Avenue/53rd Street subway station shows off the history of mass transit’s iconography and signage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is in-unit laundry the ultimate NYC apartment amenity? (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Fearing the state’s $6 billion deficit, the mayor unveiled a city budget with the smallest percent increase during his tenure as mayor. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

NYCHA’s heat outages are still abysmal, but they’re already much better than last year. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

As Barneys completes its slow march towards retail death, workers haven’t received information about a closing date, severance pay or benefits. (Sapna Maheshwari for NY Times)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to unveil a proposal to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters in New York state at his budget address next Tuesday. (NY1)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t filled his two MTA board appointments that are vacant and won’t before next week’s first two board meetings of the year. Good thing he has time to tweet about make believe bagel orders and chime in on memes about seating on subways, but can’t fill vacancies that have been open since June and November. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best cocktail bars in the city. (Sarah Probst for Thrillist)