The Briefly for June 29, 2020 – The “Even Aliens and UFOs Have Left New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Macy’s unannounced fireworks start tonight, the NYPD pepper-sprays a Pride march, open street dining, beaches opening this week and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Get ready, because tonight starts Macy’s ill-conceived fireworks displays across the city for the next five nights. The city said they will send notifications a few minutes before they start(Ron Lee for NY1)

The story of Charlie H. Cochrane, Jr., the NYPD’s first openly gay cop, who joined the force in 1967. (Carey Reed Zamarriego for Untapped Cities)

Photos: Pride Weekend’s Drag March. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

More Photos: The Drag March. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD celebrated Pride in their traditional style by pepper-spraying and arresting participants of the Queer Liberation March during a dance party in Washington Square Park. (Duncan Osborne for Gothamist)

Answering questions about the availability of the NYPD’s disciplinary records, which will become available in July. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

17 members of the city’s Corrections Department will face departmental charges for their roles in the death of Rikers Island inmate Layleen Polanco last June. Bronx District Attorney Darcel D. Clark and the city’s Department of Investigation have refused to pursue criminal charges. (Jan Ransom and Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

How Occupy City Hall’s 24-hour protests came to be. (Juliana Kim, photos by Amr Alfiky for NY Times)

“Yet on day one of his mayoralty, de Blasio betrayed his word—and even more, the Black and Hispanic communities of New York City—by bringing back an even more blatantly discriminatory policing strategy: the practice of aggressive misdemeanor arrests known as “broken windows policing.””
-Bernard E. Harcourt, professor of law and political science at Columbia University, for Gothamist, Mayor De Blasio’s Police Strategy Has Always Been Racist

The number of UFOs reported across America in the first three months of the year shot up by 112%, but New York’s UFO sightings are among the country’s lowest. Even the aliens know it’s not a good time to see the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The headline says it best: The Garbage-Scented, Siren-Laden, and Yet Still Pleasant Reality of Dining Outside Right Now (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

There are over 5,650 restaurants open for outdoor dining in the city, the Department of Transportation has an interactive map. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe some of these locations need to be double-checked since they’re in the middle of bike lanes, which is forbidden by the new guidelines. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The experience of a day of phase two inside Veselka. (Ryan Sutton, photos by Gary He for Eater)

Six ways restaurants have been innovating to enforce social distancing. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The state has extended its to-go cocktail laws for an additional 30 days. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five years of lessons learned from writing about food and dining. (Serena Dai for Eater, good luck on your new gig)

“For years, the NYPD has used the city’s public drinking laws as a simple pretext for the harassment of communities of color. Of the 15 city police precincts that wrote the most summonses for open-containers in 2010, 12 were located in communities of color. A separate Brooklyn study found that 85 percent of open container citations in that borough were given to Black and brown residents, and only 4 percent to whites.”
-Shabazz Stuart, CEO of Oonee, for Streetsblog, It’s Time to Legalize Public Drinking for All New Yorkers

Dog runs, basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, handball courts, and bocce courts are returning to the city’s parks with phase three. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything known about indoor dining, which starts on July 6 in phase three of the city’s reopening. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

For the second time in two decades, the MTA is facing a “doomsday budget.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

James Dolan owns Madison Square Garden and the Knicks and might be one of the biggest idiots in the entire city. The CDC’s website with information on Covid-19 antibodies clearly states “Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.” Has that stopped James Dolan from saying he wants to fill Madison Square Garden with people who have tested positive for antibodies for a benefit show? No it has not. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A deeper dive into the Summer Youth Employment Program, how its elimination by the de Blasio administration disproportionally affects people of color, and why kids are fighting to bring it back. (Rainer Harris for Curbed)

Red Hook’s Fairway will close by July 17. The landlord will look for a grocery store to take its place. (Liena Zagare for BKLYNER)

Mayor de Blasio is calling for a full eviction moratorium through August 20 and for the state place tenants who miss rent on a year-long payment plan to make up for back rent once they are able to work. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

New York Hall of Science won’t be reopening in 2020, opting for a 2021 date. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Getting students into classrooms in the fall, if that is an option at all, will be a difficult task. The CDC calling for children to be six feet apart, which would be impossible in the city’s 150 schools that are already operating at a capacity of 150% or more. For instance, Francis Lewis High School in Queens is built for 2,188, has 4,492 students and capacity will have to be cut to around 1,000. Whatever happens, school will not be returning to normal in the fall. (Ashleigh Garrison for Chalkbeat)

RIP Milton Glaser, who created the I ♥ NY logo. (William Grimes for NY Times)

It’s a great apartment that will be plagued with construction noise through 2035, but you’ll be close to the trains! (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Spring training hasn’t begun yet and Vegas is already predicting a better season for the Yankees than the Mets. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral welcomed people for Sunday Mass for the first time since March. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s affordable housing lottery is anything but fair to the people who can afford the least. For each apartment available for “extremely low-income” families there are 650 applicants. That is nearly 5x as many applicants for apartments for families making between $122k and $168k/year. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Sunday’s double rainbow. What does it mean? (EV Grieve)

Do you know what this city doesn’t need? A sinkhole problem. A sinkhole nearly ate an SUV on the Lower East Side over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

There are nine NYC beaches opening for swimming on July 1st. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 9, 2020 – The “A Real Reason for the City’s Curfew” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: City Council investigates the police union, Mayor de Blasio’s staff protests him, what you can expect if you take the subway, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚
Clear throughout the day.

The state Assembly passed the Eric Garner Anti-Chokehold Act. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Times goes deep on the backgrounds and possible motivations of Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman, who were arrested for allegedly throwing a Molotov cocktail into a police vehicle. (Nicole Hong and William K Rosenbaum for NY Times)

Bronx’s District Attorney Darcel Clark found “no criminality” in the death of Layleen Polanco, the 27-year-old Afro-Latina trans woman who died in her cell in Rikers Island a year ago. Polanco was in Rikers because she was unable to pay a $500 cash bail. Adding insult to injury is DA Clark’s use of Polanco’s deadname rather than her chosen name. (Harron Walker for Jezebel)

Video: A man drove his car through on the sidewalk through a group of peaceful protesters. After a week of beating the shit out of protesters all across the city for an entire week, watch the NYPD civilly confront him while arresting him. Yes, he was white, how did you know? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

I hope you’re sitting down. The city’s police watchdog on Monday released its first-ever report on the NYPD’s treatment of young people, ages 10 to 18 — and found that boys who are black or Hispanic are disproportionately victims of cop misconduct. (Eileen Grench for The City)

A federal judge has ordered the NYPD to incorporate their formerly secret lists of police officers with dishonesty issues into an early intervention system, which will use data to identify officers exhibiting disturbing behavior. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

When the dust settles, remember who publicly defended the NYPD. Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg said she would not commit to reducing or eliminating her agency’s partnership with the NYPD. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“In a critical time of vicious income inequality and racial disparity, he has shown New York City he is not an ally to progressives. Real New Yorkers take firm stances on tough issues…And it’s high time the Mayor decides whether or not he’s in favor of the NYPD’s aggression or people’s dignity.” -Nicholas Tamborra, the vice president of the Lambda Independent Democrats (LID), an LGBTQ political club in Brooklyn. (Duncan Osbourn for Gay City News)

The mayor may not be comfortable with defunding the police, but he’s 100% comfortable with defunding affordable housing. It’s an issue that he supposedly cares about, but in his proposed budget he cuts over a billion dollars from the Department of Housing Preservation and Development. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Let’s check in with the latest progress on the L train construction. It’s not terrible, so there’s some good news today. (EV Grieve)

A guide to the city’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The MTA wanted 60 miles of new busways for phase one of the city’s reopening. The mayor, never one to completely rise to any occasion, provided 20 miles of new busways on Jamaica Ave, Manhattan’s Fifth Ave, Brooklyn’s Jay Street, and E 181st St for car-free roads and four more for dedicated lanes. He also made the 14th St busway permanent. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor said in an interview that it was his fear of Governor Cuomo taking over the situation that led him to institute the city’s curfew. Did all of this happen because Mayor de Blasio and Governor Cuomo can’t see eye to eye on anything? (NY1)

While this piece is about Mayor de Blasio defending the detaining of protesters for over 24 hours, there’s a tidbit about a rumor of NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Chief of Department Terence Monahan resigning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The mayor won’t commit to a number when it comes to defunding the NYPD, but he’s made the smallest of changes. A small portion of the budget would be diverted to youth and social services for communities of color, the dollar amount is unknown. The NYPD won’t be responsible for overseeing street vendors, giving instead to a civilian agency. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

“We have been fighting for this for years now, and this is just the bare minimum.” The reaction to the NYPD not overseeing street vendors wasn’t exactly met with a huge reaction. The NYPD had previously written 18,000 tickets per year to vendors. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The City Council’s Oversight and Investigations Committee is calling for an investigation of the NYPD union that released personal information on Chiara de Blasio’s arrest. The SBA, which City Councilmember Richie Torres called a hate group, tweeted her height, weight, and address, which is a violation of the city’s charter. SBA president Ed Mullins is already under investigation for declaring “war” on the mayor in February. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

You can no longer hide behind your black wife and children, you are exposed now. We are in a time when we need your leadership and it’s not there.” -NYC Public Advocate Jumaane Williams about Mayor de Blasio. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

Looking for a safe space while protesting? The city’s theaters and museums are opening their lobbies to help you. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Hundreds of current and former Mayor de Blasio staffers gathered for a protest of the mayor for his failure to protect Black and brown residents of the city that he swore he would shield from racist policing. (Terrell Jermaine Starr for The Root)

Photos: The Green-Wood Cemetery tribute to New Yorkers lost to Covid-19. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Workers in Amazon’s Staten Island warehouse are suing the company to ask for safer working conditions. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

14 notable NYC restaurants and bars that have now permanently closed. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Here’s what you can expect the next time you take the subway. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo announced the city can resume elective surgeries and ambulatory care. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Say hello to Scott Wiener, the owner of the world’s largest pizza box collection and the founder of Slice out Hunger and Scott’s Pizza Tours. How many boxes you ask? 1,550. (Anne Ewbank for Atlas Obscura)

Video: Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Suraj Patel, Pete Harrison, Lauren Ashcraft debate ahead of the primary for New York’s 12th Congressional District. (Gotham Gazette)

The Columbus Circle Target is expected to open this fall instead of its original July 19th date. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Child abuse cases are down 51%, this is worrisome. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

35 restaurants supporting the Black community. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chelsea for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!