The Briefly for October 17, 2019 – The “Did 14th St Cause the Apocalypse?” Edition

A Halloween guide for dog lovers, New York can get around presidential pardons, 100 community gardens may close, the best Harlem restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

If you want to see dogs in Halloween costumes, this is your guide. (Gothamist)

There are more two-bedroom apartments available in Brooklyn than Manhattan. (StreetEasy)

Whoever is setting the Lower East Side Park port-a-potties on fire, stop it. (Patch)

The data is in and the 14th St busway did not cause the apocalypse. There was barely any change to the traffic on the surrounding streets. The study was conducted by the same people that found that the new Kosciuszko Bridge actually made traffic worse than before it was replaced. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD’s Hyun Kim, 25, was charged Saturday with two counts of menacing after pointing his gun at waitresses at a bar in Queens. (Gothamist)

A look inside the new TWA Hotel. (Forgotten New York)

Finally, a reason to go to Times Square! Check out the They Live-inspired billboard from Mitch “The World’s Best Artist” O’Connell at 7th Ave and 48th St. (Boing Boing)

With Mother Cabrini in the news so much, take a tour down Cabrini Blvd in Washington Heights. It’s not arbitrarily named, it’s where she was interred for many years. (Forgotten New York)

If you’re into meta museum exhibits, the Museum of the City of New York’s Cultivating Culture is for you, focusing on 34 museums. Here are ten treasures from the exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

It didn’t take long, but the mystery of how a man ended up dead under a manhole seems to have been solved. On September 30, the man walked through multiple safety barriers and fell in and workers closed it up two hours later, not knowing he was down there. (Gothamist)

The former Caffe Cino location is now NYC’s newest landmark. It’s considered to be the home of Off Off Broadway. It’s currently home to the bar The Drunken Monkey. It was one of the six LGBTQ landmarks considered this week from the NYC Landmarks Commission. (Untapped Cities)

Apple and Facebook are in a new competition, but this time it’s over office space in the post office building on 8th Ave. (The Real Deal)

Lose a chainsaw? They’ve got it for you at the Penn Station lost and found. (Gothamist)

Opinion: In support of ranked-choice voting. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (The Infatuation)

Video: See the newest residents of the Bronx Zoo, a trio of dholes, which are adorable and endangered wild dogs named Roan, Apollo, and Kito. (Viewing NYC)

Audio: A real look at gentrification, using Bed-Stuy’s recent neighborhood changes as a backdrop. (Brooklyn Based)

NYPD sergeant Linhong Li is the 10th member of the NYPD to commit suicide in 2019. He died of a gunshot to the head in his home in Fresh Meadows. Four members died by suicide in 2018. (Gothamist)

The land use committee approved the Rikers replacement jails, clearing the way for a full City Council vote today. (Politico)

Does NYC’s affordable housing program go far enough? (Curbed)

Representatives Eliot Engel, Jerry Nadler, Carolyn Maloney, and Yvette Clarke are all subject of AOC-style challenges for their seats in 2020. (Politico)

There are 100 community gardens that are in danger of closing because of the Parks Department’s new GreenThumb policies that it is mandating gardens sign in order to remain open. Volunteer organizations that run the refusing gardens say the rules are onerous and make it unviable to run the spaces. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A new law in New York will allow the state to bring charges against anyone who receives a presidential pardon for related crimes, citing the Supreme Court’s decision that double jeopardy does not apply to the states’ ability to bring charges that were also tried federally. (Politico)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Village Halloween Parade. (curbed)

27 hit Harlem restaurants to try. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)