The Briefly for February 10, 2020 – The “NYPD Declares War on Mayor de Blasio” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The brokers’ fees mess, NY sues the federal government over the Truster Traveler Programs ban, AOC’s BEC, touristy restaurants that are good, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 49˚
Light rain throughout the day.

Photos: The Pet Fashion Show. (Gabe Herman, photos by Milo Hess for amNewYork Metro)

New York City is better than any other city. Why? Everyone has their reason that makes New York their city. For Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, as we discovered on Desus and Metro one of the reasons is the bacon, egg, and cheeses. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

It doesn’t matter if it’s Chicago Pizza, California In-N-Out, or New Jersey laughably calling itself the pizza capital of the world, New York doesn’t care if you think your food is better. It’s not. (Serena Dai for Eater)

High Maintenance came back to HBO on Sunday, here is a list of filing locations. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A man shot two police officers on Sunday in the Bronx in targeted assassination attempts. There is currently no known connection to any protests or politics and the man, Robert Williams, was out on parole since 2017, pre-dating recent reforms. Williams’s son was shot and killed in the street and according to Williams’s grandmother he “never got over it.” He surrender himself to the police. (Elisha Brown and Michael Levenson for NY Times)

In response to the shootings, the Police Benevolent Association’s message to the mayor was straight forward. “The members of the NYPD are declaring war on you!” and “This isn’t over, Game on!” Oh boy. (Sanjana Karanth for HuffPost)

Because nothing is easy, real estate agents are trying to find every last way around the new Department of State guidance about broker’s fees. Most of the confusion they are creating is who they work for. Does the broker represent you or do they represent the landlord? Check your paperwork. (Jake Offenhartz and Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Real Estate Board of New York will, of course, try to stop the guidance with a lawsuit. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

An overview on what’s happening with broker’s fees. (Localize Labs)

A look and some recent history of the city’s protest murals. (Yoonji Han)

Photos: Scenes from the Golden Gauntlet Graffiti Battle. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The City Council is taking a look into ghost kitchens, with the possibility of wanting oversight over them, specifically if they prove to be unfair competition against real restaurants. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. On Friday morning, a water main broke on Broadway, flooding the immediate area and causing all varieties of chaos. This third break in four weeks was at 110th. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor’s “fix” for the crumbling NYCHA, the Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program, may be putting the apartments that are a part of the program into an even worse predicament. Apartments under the RAD program are no longer under the oversight of the city and federal monitor. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

RAD is a national program enacted in 2012 that allows public housing agencies to switch the way they get money from the feds — moving from Section 9 (the way NYCHA-owned properties have historically been funded) to Section 8 (a program that funds private landlords). (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Play around with interactive charts showing the most popular and most money-making Broadway shows of the past 20-some odd years. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

amNewYork Metro has “3 ideas for a Knicks rebrand.” All three of them are basically “make it the 90s again.” (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what the proposed 900-foot tall tower that will be built on top of Macy’s in Herald square will look like. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

You’ve got the rest of the week to “Name A Roach” at the Bronx Zoo. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Does the city need another stadium? Your answer doesn’t seem to matter, the N.Y.C.F.C. are close to moving forward with a plan to put a brand new soccer stadium a few blocks south of Yankee Stadium. There is an affordable housing component to the deal as well that will no doubt please the mayor and help ram this project through the city’s approval process. (David Waldstein for NY Times)

While the coronavirus isn’t a welcome addition to the city originating in China, hot pot restaurants are a different story. (Tony Lin for Eater)

Where to eat in the city’s Chinatowns. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Wired: Fearing the flu. Tired: Fearing the coronavirus. (Adam Nichols)

New York will sue the Trump administration over the Truster Traveler Programs ban, arguing the government’s decision was arbitrary, violate’s the state’s covering immunity, and was (not a real quote) “a dick move.” (Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

The MTA is planning to connect the Livonia Avenue L station and the Junius Street 3 station in Brooklyn by 2024. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Chinatown’s Lunar New Year Parade. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Another story about how some city officials want to push the BQX forward, but this was included for a great photo of a board in a meeting asking for feedback, full of Post-It notes saying things like “NO BQX.” (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Video: A walk through the Bronx. (ActionKid)

Caroline Baumann, the director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in Manhattan, abruptly quit on Friday with no explanation given as to why. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The XFL is here (again) and The New York Guardians won their first game. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

13 touristy restaurants that are actually good. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to @directorchick for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 7, 2020 – The Weekend “Who Are We Saving Our City From?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The State of the City, the 14 best brunch spots, the people trying to talk to strangers on the subway, another failure for the Mets, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 57˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 31˚ High: 44˚

The Department of Homeland Security is blocking New Yorkers from enrolling in the Trusted Traveler Programs, including Global Entry, in a petty and spiteful move but he president to attempt to punish New York. At the center of it all is the state’s Green Light Law, which allows undocumented immigrants to get driver’s licenses. (Azi Paybarah for NY Times)

“This is unbounded arrogance, disrespect of the rule of law, hyper-political government, and this is another form of extortion” -Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (Jesse McKinley, Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Correal for NY Times)

Watch the full State of the City address. (NYC Mayor’s Office)

The mayor’s seventh State of the City address focused on helping small businesses, overhauling his affordable housing plan, boosting high school graduation rates and investing in green energy. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Our idiot mayor’s theme for his speech was “Save Our City.” Listen jackass, who are you saving it from? You’ve been in charge for six years now, you are the person this city needs to be saved from. He claims to be energized from his abject failure of a presidential run, which no one wanted him to do in the first place. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

The mayor’s goal of creating 300,000 units of affordable housing may not be possible with neighborhoods pushing back against the city’s attempted rezonings. With the de Blasio administration seeing rezonings of wealthy neighborhoods as politically impossible, the burden unfairly falls on lower-income or minority neighborhoods. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

After a decade of disenfranchising development that displaces different neighborhoods’ denizens, lower-income and minority communities feel it’s necessary to fight back. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Does Vision Zero need saving? The mayor unveiled “Vision Zero Unit”, 100 NYPD officers tasked with patrolling hot spots where pedestrians and cyclists have been killed. There are very few people that believe a new NYPD unit, rather than better training, will make a difference. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Are you thinking about popping the question next week? The 10 best places in NYC to propose. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

Take a look up on Saturday night and you’ll find a super snow moon. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Subway riders beware: The Subway Social Club is trying to make the subways “friendlier” by talking to strangers on the train. An admirable goal, but please oh god don’t talk to me on the subway. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Bar cars, a place for socializing, on MetroNorth and the LIRR are a thing of the past. A look back at the tiki bar car on MetroNorth. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

So broker’s fees are gone for apartment rentals, here’s what it means. There are still situations where a broker’s fee will apply, it all depends who hires the broker. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Have you bought a lottery ticket in Long Island City or at Nonna’s Kitchen & Deli in the Bronx? The state lottery is waiting for you to pick up your $1 million prize. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How to donate or dispose of furniture in the city. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

An ICE officer shot someone while on duty at a private residence in Brooklyn. Why do ICE agents have guns? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

All twelve members of the New York City Council’s women’s caucus are calling for the resignation of Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance over his perceived mishandling of a multiple high-profile sexual assault cases, including Harvey Weinstein, Jeffrey Epstein, and Robert Hadden, the gynecologist who abused women during gynecological exams. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The newest Food Bazaar in the Bronx, at 83,000 square feet, is absolutely massive and the biggest supermarket in the borough. (Ed García Conde for Welome2TheBronx)

The 31 best dive bars in the city. (Luke Fortney and Erika Adams for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is offering a new “Unhung Heroes of the Metropolitan” tour, which highlights the tiny dicks that can be found in the museum’s art collection. Tickets are available for the nice price of $69 for adults. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A court upheld the ruling that fantasy sports websites like DraftKings and FanDuel are illegal gambling sites and a 2016 law that allowed the websites violated state law. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Who doesn’t love telling other New Yorkers what to do? The Brooklyn Public Library is looking for votes for the “North Brooklyn Reads” poll. (Greenpointers)

Photos: The mural in Brooklyn paying tribute to Gigi and Kobe Bryant. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Fred Wilpon destroyed the Mets’ ability to sell the team with his insistence that continue to be involved in the team. It it wasn’t for James Dolan, Fred Wilpon would be the dirt worst owner of anything in New York. (Jenna West for Sports Illustrated)

LaLou, Portale, and Kindred have been added to Eater’s 14 hottest brunch restaurants in the city. (Stefanie Tuder for Eater)

The Briefly for January 31, 2020 – The Weekend “Three Story Tall Taco Ball in Midtown” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Breaking car culture on the BQE, Decolonize This Place wants to “f**k s**t up” on the subways, a Dolly Parton cover band reviews a Dolly Parton bar and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 45˚

Decolonize This Place plans to “fuck shit up” on the subways today. The group declared the 31st as a day of protest to send the message that New York will not tolerate the surge of police on the subways. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

100 bus stations in 18 neighborhoods across the city will sport a photo exhibition from artist Farah Al Qasimi called Back and Forth Disco, which celebrates “individuality and the aesthetic choices that make spaces and surroundings uniquely personal.” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

De Blasio’s panel focused on what to do with the crumbling BQE has a recommendation: Preserve the Brooklyn Promenade and close one lane in either direction, limiting the amount of traffic that can be on the road and encourage diversions. The recommendations are for the remaining time the BQE stands, but it will have to be replaced at some point in the future. If the city wants to break car culture, things have to get worse for drivers before it gets better for everyone. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Is Midtown ready for a three story Taco Bell Cantina? (Nicholas Rizzi for Commercial Observer)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has a plan for universal affordable housing. The mayoral hopeful’s plan would require a quarter of new apartments in any development with more than 10 apartments be set aside for tenants earning 60% of the area median income or $58,000 a year for a family of three. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

The most “affordable” neighborhood in Manhattan is Washington Heights, where you’ll only pay $652 per square foot. (emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Four Queens borough president candidates have been eliminated from the ballot, leaving Consta Constantinides, Elizabeth Crowler, Jim Quinn, and Dao Yin for March 24. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Nearly 2,000 kids might not be able to find a kindergarten to meet their needs this spring, amid a shortage of space in special education pre-K classrooms, according to a new study released Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Dermot Shea is the city’s first NYPD commissioner registered with a political party. in over 30 years. Does the Republican Shea support the president’s anti-immigration policies? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition winner was unveiled on Thursday. Heart Squared is a 125 mirror installation arranged in the shape of a heart and is in Father Duffy Square in Times Square. Check it out the next time someone tricks you into going there. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn Eagle fired four employees, their editor-in-chief Ned Berke, managing editor Sara Bosworth, reporter Meaghan McGoldrick, and growth manager Cambria Roth, in what seems to be a combination of a failed attempt to secure investment and the publisher of the company’s issues with “woke journalism.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The First National City Bank building, on the corner of Canal and Broadway, will become Mercato Fabbrica, a 35,000-square-foot Italian-style food hall, with groceries, a tea parlor, coffee house, nano-brewery, boutique, rooftop terrace, and a “culinary social club with cowering lounge”. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Using the Tessa Majors murder as a backdrop, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is calling for every school in the city to have a full-time social worker. The three suspects in the case are all teenage boys who were attending P.S. 180 in Manhattan. P.S. 180 has 500 students and until recently had only been served by a single part-time social worker. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Who better to review a Dolly Parton-themed bar than Doll Parts, a Dolly Parton cover band. (Maggie Robinson Katz and Julie Sirna-Frest for Brooklyn Paper)

In a “just when you thought it couldn’t get worse” scenario, a Brooklyn mother’s day went from “no good” to “very bad” very quickly. One of her children got sick and puked on a bus, which was taken out of service. On the street, another passenger on the bus pulled a knife and slashed her face before running off. The mother went to Brookdale Hospital for the slash. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say hello to the four new flavors at Van Leeuwen: marionberry cheesecake, Irish cream, ginger lemon poppy seed crumble, and churros & fudge. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Video: Maybe We Woke Up: The Saving of Neir’s Tavern, a six minute documentary. (Christopher Ming Ryan and Evan Fairbanks)

The NYPD is sending high ranking officers to talk to the public to scare monger against the state’s new bail reforms. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

Shakespeare in the Park announced its shows in its 2020 season: Richard II and As You Like It (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

When contemplating a cab vs a Lyft/Uber, you weight the options. The inconvenience but lower price of a cab vs the convenience and potential surge pricing of a Lyft/Uber. Throw that out the window, because a panel is set to recommend surge pricing for taxis. (NY Times)

The best meals for around $20 on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Murat for today’s featured photo!