The Briefly for February 26, 2019 – The “Trial of Socialite Grifter is the New Trial of El Chapo” Edition

Inside a multi-million dollar Airbnb scam, the Public Advocate election, Eater’s massive guide to NYC Chinese food, the mystery of the barnacle Citi Bike, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the last guide to today’s election that you’ll see in The Briefly. (Patch)

Polling places opened at 6am and will be open until 9pm. Find your polling location.

Double check to see if you are registered if you have any doubts.

The Board of Education’s attempts to keep translators out of polling locations has failed. A state judge rejected the lawsuit and the city will add Russian, Yiddish, Haitian Creole, and Polish translators to 48 locations in addition to Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, and Bangala. (Patch)

El Chapo’s trial is over just in time for the city to get ready for the trial of the socialite grifter Anna Delvey. (NY Post)

‘“We’re not criminals,” he said at his lawyer’s office, while puffing from a Juul he kept in a black leather pouch fastened to a chain around his neck. He shrugged: “I don’t own a yacht or a big penthouse.”’ Inside a $20 million Airbnb scam across 130 apartments in the city which housed nearly 76,000 guests using 100 host accounts and 18 corporations in order to obfuscate the con. (NY Times)

A map of the city’s farmers’ markets, CSAs, food boxes, and fresh pantries. (City Council)

Have you witnessed the subways “dramatic” improvement in service? I guess it depends if you consider 76.6% a good grade. (Curbed)

A cab driver who fatally hit a young woman and drove away on Sunday was released from police custody without being charged. No reason for the lack of charges was given. (NY Post)

Rockaway Beach is literally disappearing. (CBS New York)

The MTA announced four public meetings to go over the new L train non-shutdown repairs. (6sqft)

A new coalition of people in the sex trades wants New York to become the first state to fully decriminalize sex work. (The Appeal)

The city’s newest and greatest mystery is the Citi Bike covered in barnacles. (Gothamist)

Say goodbye to MetroCards, say hello to OMNY. It stands for One Metro New York and is the future of paying for your crappy subway and bus service. (BrooklynVegan)

The city will be hit with a Bernie Bro-nado this weekend as Bernie Sanders will stage his first 2020 campaign rally at Brooklyn College. (amNY)

This is what an escalator looks like when it malfunctions and it is terrifying. (amNY)

Will the Brooklyn Promenade’s potential highway replacement bring back an old idea of a cross-Brooklyn underground highway? Is Brooklyn ready for its own version of Boston’s The Big Dig? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Today is the 26 year anniversary of the 1993 World Trade Center bombings. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Red Flag” gun control bill into law. The law prohibits anyone showing signs they are a threat to themselves or others from buying or possessing any type of firearm. New York is the first state that authorizes teachers, family members, and school administrators to fight school shootings by seeking preemptive action. (Politico)

The latest school to find itself in hot water after students were caught on video being presidential-level homophobic, misogynistic, and racist is Ethical Culture Fieldston School in the Bronx. (NY Post)

Lola Jean will be trying to set “The World Squirting Record” tonight as part of a kinky carnival. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Timothy Glover, hero, was charged with criminal mischief in the second-degree for beheading Diddy’s statue at Madame Tussaud’s. (NY Post)

The City Council is readying a pied-à-terre tax on non-primary residence apartments purchased for over $5 million. (amNY)

It’s a sprint for the city to finish the necessary work on 5,800 NYCHA apartments that need to have lead-contaminated paint issues resolved before the end of the month to comply with a federally imposed deadline. (NY Post)

Eater has published its massive and exhaustive guide to Chinese food in NYC. (Eater)

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The Briefly for February 21, 2019 – The “No One Thinks de Blasio Should Run for President” Edition

A look at the Public Advocate debate, low-level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn, the city lied to get more FEMA funding, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It looks like a museum, but it’s a button store named for a Gertrude Stein poem. (Atlas Obscura)

The city subpoenaed 20,000 apartment listings from Airbnb as a response to what Mayor de Blasio says is Airbnb’s unwillingness to cooperate with the city to crackdown on illegal hotels. (The Real Deal)

The 11 best things to do on Roosevelt Island, but maybe you want to wait for spring first. (6sqft)

There is a special election for the city’s Public Advocate on Tuesday. As a reader of The Briefly you are among some of the most informed voters in the city. Here’s what you need to know about the election. (Gothamist)

Watch the second Public Advocate debate in full. (NY1)

There is one thing that all the Public Advocate candidates from last night’s debate agree on: Bill de Blasio should not run for president. (Politico)

StreetsPAC has endorsed Melissa Mark-Viverito for Public Advocate. (Streetsblog)

The 12 best restaurants in Rego Park and Forest Hills. (Grub Street)

Five takeaways from the Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

New York City will never become a cashless society if Councilman Ritchie Torres’s bill passes. (NY Times)

Low level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn. At a cost of $2,000 per arrest, it’s quite a bit of savings. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Can you run a business out of your apartment? (Bushwick Daily)

If you want to party like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide. If you want to avoid partying like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide of places to avoid. (amNY)

13 bars and restaurants for history lovers across the United States, including Manhattan’s Fraunces Tavern. (Atlas Obscura)

The gentrification of Bed Stuy is threatening the existence of the city’s last black-owned LGBTQ club. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Have you ever been through a breakup so bad that it makes you swear off dating altogether? The End Corporate Welfare Act is the City Council’s version of that with luring giant corporations to the city with subsidies. (Patch)

Take a look at Spike Lee’s New York City. (StreetEasy)

How can the MTA fix the R train? Congressman Max Rose’s solution is Solomon-esque. (amNY)

Murder in the city is up by 55% this year compared to last. Some police officers are blaming the end of stop and frisk. (NY Post)

The city lied to FEMA to get more Hurricane Sandy relief funding and will pay the federal government back more than $5.3 million as part of a tentative settlement. (NY Times)

East Harlem residents are feeling pissed about this closed public bathroom. So are the recipients of the more than 1,500 public urination summonses in the area. (Patch)

Winter is harsh on the city, but it causes chaos, explosions, fires, leaks, and uncertainty underground, where electric, steam, water, and gas lines flow. Climate change is making it worse. (NY Times)

Bookmark this list for the next extremely cold day. 19 stellar soups. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 15, 2019 – The “8% Rate of Success” Edition

Early voting passes the state legislature, Governor Cuomo thinks the city should foot half the bill for the subway, the best winter brunches, the Amazon-Chrysler building, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

10 short interviews about congestion pricing with state legislators. (Streetsblog)

The annual No Pants Subway Ride happened. There are photos. (Gothamist)

Voting reform passed the state legislature, which adds 10 days of early voting, consolidates state and federal primary dates, and pre-registers 17 and 17-year-olds when they sign up for a driving permit. A constitutional amendment was proposed that will allow same-day voter registration and allow anyone to vote absentee without an excuse.(CBS New York)

Signal problems caused delays during 92% of weekdays in 2018. Since the city enacted the Subway Action Plan, delays have increased. (Daily News)

The state is doubling the amount of speed cameras in the city’s school zones as part of Governor Cuomo’s state budget, increasing from 149 to 290, which matches the number of cameras the state’s legislature was trying to pass last year. (Streetsblog)

The best winter brunch spots. (Thrillist)

This is why we can’t have nice things. The city is suing Metropolitan Property Group for running an illegal Airbnb network in 130 apartments, which housing more than 75,000 guests from 2015 to 2018. (The Real Deal)

Okay, so “Amazon” is the new default answer for any question, but who will be the Chrysler Building’s new tenant? Yup, Amazon. (6sqft)

Here’s what to know about the city’s new, updated and existing ferry routes. (amNY)

Meet Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the the Metropolitan Opera new openly gay conductor. (NY Times)

Say farewell to Westsider Books on Broadway in the Upper West Side. Not every closing bookstore has a Lin-Manuel Miranda. (West Side Rag)

“Being from Staten Island gives you that ability to brush it off.” Being from Staten Island made the cast of MTV’s “Made in Staten Island” immune to criticism that they are tarnishing the pristine public image of Staten Island. (amNY)

The secret economy of diabetes test strips. (NY Times)

Everyone wants to be the one that fixes the subways, but no one wants to pay for it. (NY Post)

Do you have what it takes to drink this $375, 20 pound spiked hot chocolate? (Time Out)

Five things to look for in today’s state budget address today (Tuesday). (amNY)

The Port Authority removed the Saudi Arabia part of the “Candy Nations” art installation due to its proximity to the World Trade Center due to complains that point out the Saudi connection to the 9/11 attacks. (NY Post)

JFK and Laguardia airports have been providing food to TSA and Federal Aviation Administration workers while they aren’t paid during President Trump’s government shutdown. (Airport Voice)

The government shutdown means no family visiting at Metropolitan Correctional Center, the high-security federal jail in Manhattan that houses terrorists, white-collar criminals, and El Chapo. Prisoners are on a hunger strike after the second week of canceled visits due to staffing shortages. (NY Times)

Turns out a plan similar to governor Cuomo’s new L train non-shutdown was considered and rejected five years ago because of serious safety concerns. (NY Times)

He can decide the L train shutdown isn’t happening and declare emergency meetings of the MTA board, but Governor Cuomo still claims that he’s not in charge of the MTA. (Second Ave. Sagas)

The person handpicked by Mayor de Blasio to head up his BQX streetcar project left the United States for a new job in Saudi Arabia. (Politico)

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