The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for April 4, 2019 – The “De Blasio Does His Best Cuomo Impression” Edition

New Yorkers are united in their opposition to the mayor’s presidential hopes, Manhattan’s accidental leaning tower, Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle”, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

12 new art installations to check out in Apriln. (Untapped Cities)

Queens Councilman Eric Ulrich is calling on the mayor to fire the Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Steve Banks in a change.org petition. Ulrich says Banks’ failure to address chronic homelessness is the base reason for the petition. (QNS)

The mayor announced an “expert panel” to fix the mess that is the BQE construction. The panel will be lead by the CEO of a construction trade lobbying group and include people from a Google/Alphabet subsidiary, the Regional Planning Association, NYU, multiple trade and construction groups, and others. The panel is light on urban planning experts and will be tasked with finding an outcome that is “in the best interests of everyone.” (Gothamist)

It seems Rock & Roll is an acceptable art form now, getting its first exhibition at the Met. (Gothamist)

Donald Trump’s first Manhattan real estate project pioneered the tax incentives whose lineage can be traced all the way to the recent imploded Amazon deal. (Curbed)

Yesterday we learned that we’re paying the highest taxes in the country, and now there’s an indication that the city is over-taxing hundreds of small buildings accidentally, in some cases 4x the appropriate rate. (The Real Deal)

Taking a dip in the East River anytime soon? Here’s a field guide to what you might find in the water. (Gothamist)

If you’re interested in working the 2020 Census, there will be a job fair at Queens Borough Hall on May 1. (QNS)

The list of the world’s best hospitals includes three hospitals in the city. (Patch)

A look in photos of what is left of “Italian Williamsburg.” (NY Times)

Here’s a look at the OMNY subway NFC systems in the wild. If the demo iPhones in Apple stores can always be found to have fecal matter on them, imagine how gross these screens are going to get. (Gothamist)

Something is fishy about the city’s purchase of buildings for $173 million when their first estimate valued them at $50 million. Also, the landlords are represented by a lawyer who is helping the mayor raise money to fly around the country pretending anyone wants to see him run for president. (NY Times)

As a reminder, 76% of New Yorkers don’t want the mayor to run for president. Only 42% approve of the job he’s doing in New York. (amNY)

Why does no one want the mayor to run for president? Maybe it’s a moment like this, where he blamed the federal government for all of the city’s problems. (NY Post)

Manhattan has its own leaning tower. A 58-story condo on Maiden Lane is leaning North by three inches as a result of a faulty foundation, according to a lawsuit. Construction is still continuing, despite complaints. (Gothamist)

638 of the city’s bridges are considered “structurally deficient,” which include the Brooklyn Bridge and the Throgs Neck. (Patch)

In the last four years, Uber spent $2 million lobbying in favor of congestion pricing. (NY Post)

A body of a 53-year-old man was discovered in the water near the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle.” How Doyers Street’s gang violence earned it that nickname. (Streeteasy)

A look at The Shed, Hudson Yards’ cultural center which has more configurations than a transformer. (Engadget)

20 tasty Thai restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The city’s comptroller wants the Department of Transportation to take control of the NYC Ferry system from private company Hornblower after learning how astronomically high the city subsidizes each rider’s trip. (Curbed)

After a 10-year fight with the MTA, Luis Colon was awarded $22 million after needing spinal fusion surgery from a fall from a makeshift platform on the Henry Hudson Bridge. (NY Post)

Take a look at this insane plan from the 1940s to build an airport on top of buildings from 24th to 71st Streets. (Viewing NYC)

The best spring break food and drinks. (amNY)

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The Briefly for February 6, 2019 – The “Do You Smell Maple Syrup or an Oil Spill?” Edition

Historians plan to block the Brooklyn Promenade construction, the NYCHA gets a new leader, an atomic Super Bowl meltdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Get a feel for the city’s housing crisis with an interactive map of 20,000 evictions in 2018. (Curbed)

How to watch tonight’s ten person Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

Has it already been ten years since the mysterious maple syrup smell took over the city. Was it Northrax? Nope. It was a a perfume and food additive processing plant. (Gothamist)

The MTA is having a banner week. Maybe they’re celebrating the anniversary? A noxious gas filled the L train tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn on Tuesday as a result of an oil leak. (Brooklyn Paper)

Know your pain before you arrive. JFK, Newark, and LaGuardia’s websites now show real-time information on the wait times for taxis and TSA checkpoints. (Curbed)

The mayor expanded dual-language pre-K programs, which will now include French, Haitian Creole, Japanese, and Hebrew in addition to Spanish, Chinese, Russian, and Bengali, which are already available. The expansion has a dual purpose of also giving the mayor more control over the city’s schools. (Chalkbeat)

Why city parking is so annoying and how to master it. (Thrillist)

Historic preservation groups may sue the city if the city’s BQE plans move forward that removes the Brooklyn Promenade. (Curbed)

Apple may open a new office at Hudson Yards. Another tech company making a home in NYC without negotiating subsidies. (6sqft)

Why are condos more expensive than co-ops? (StreetEasy)

If you hate large sandwiches, this tiny egg sandwich is for you. (Eater)

Five mothers filed complaint against the NYPD after they say they were forced to pump breast milk in front of their colleagues, a violation of a 2007 law. (NY Post)

The 9 most romantic spots in NYC and also the Staten Island Ferry. (6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is claiming the state senate is playing politics with the Amazon HQ2 deal by appointing Senator Michael Gianaris to the Public Authorities Control Board. The governor has to approve Gianaris’ appointment to the board. Will he? “Well we’re not there yet.” (Gothamist)

State Senator Michael Gianaris gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

Trump Tower: Luxury living for the morally bankrupt. (EV Grieve)

The FDNY saved 46 puppies and two cats from a burning pet store on the Upper East Side. No puppies were injured. (NY Post)

It’s a bad week for Broadway shows. “Anastasia” will lose on March 31. (NY Times)

NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia will serve as interim head of NYCHA, Garcia is the head of the Department of Sanitation and also the city’s lead czar. (Pix 11)

MoMA will close for four months to re-envision how the collection is presented, from June 15 to October 21. (Patch)

The East Village’s Atomic Wings had a super atomic meltdown during the Super Bowl. (Eater)

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