The Briefly for July 14, 2020 – The “Like Noise Canceling for Your Open Windows” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All politics is beans, the NYPD protects a Blue Lives Matter rally, marriage can wait (it has to), the Mets have a possible buyer, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

10 things you must know about NYC before moving here. It’s probably too late for all of you. Do you know these things? #1 is “It’s expensive,” so you probably know that one. (Localize.City)

Shake Shack gave its PPP loan back. Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group fired 2,000 of its 2,300 employees in March and used different LLCs to apply and receive loans between $11.4 million and $27 million. (Matthew Schuerman with research by Jake Dobkin and Megan Zerez for Gothamist)

It’s not ready for purchase, but researchers in Singapore have developed an early version of noise canceling headphones for your apartment windows. (David Waldstein for NY Times)

Goya is at the center of politics in 2020, a statement no one saw coming, from Republican Nicole Malliotakis’s Goya canned food drive to AOC publishing an Adobo recipe. This is all because the CEO of Goya said the USA is “truly blessed” to have a leader like President Trump. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The White Horse Tavern, which openly flaunted the state’s social distancing guidelines, had its liquor license temporarily suspended. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a break from everyday life? Six unique NYC Airbnbs. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Looking to get married in the city? You’re gonna have to wait. Appointments to get a license using the city’s “Project Cupid” site has a backlog that stretches on for months. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Davell Gardner, a 1-year-old boy, was shot dead at a BBQ in Bed-Stuy at the Raymond Bush playground on Sunday night. Three other people were shot, but are expected to survive. (NY1)

If C.K. McWhorter’s $1.8 billion bid to buy the Mets goes through, he would become the only black owner in Major League Baseball. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Trigg Brown — the chef and co-owner of one of NYC’s most buzzed-about restaurants, Win Son — is temporarily stepping away from day-to-day operations after employees leveled allegations that he fostered a hostile workplace. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Black Lives Matter mural outside of Trump Tower was already defaced. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sunday on the beach at Coney Island was a great example of a failure to socially distance. In a neighborhood without Open Streets or many parks, the beach is the only viable place to gather outdoors. (Ariama C. Long for Kings County Politics)

Say hello to Chi Ossé, an activist running for City Council in the 36th District and the youngest candidate to ever run for City Council. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

36 members of the City Council are calling on Joe Borelli, a City Councilmember from Staten Island, to apologize after his obviously racist attack on the celebration. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It seems the city has finally rid itself of a noted homophobe and City Councilmember Rubén Díaz Sr., whose Congressional bid was met with a responding “NOPE.” Díaz Sr. won’t be seeking office after his term is up in 2021. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal is dropping out of the race for Comptroller in 2021, blaming her dropping out on the coronavirus pandemic. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance hasn’t announced if he’ll be seeking another term in office, but his list of challengers is growing. Despite making recent headlines with cases against President Trump and Harvey Weinstein, Vance’s office has garnered a lot of well-earned criticism for how it’s handled abuse cases against the rich and famous. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The five candidates vying for Vance’s job will participate in a forum today, essentially the race’s first debate, without Vance. (Andrew Millman for Gotham Gazette)

All travelers flying into airports in New York state will now have to fill out a form providing contact and itinerary information or face a $2,000 fine. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Strand’s new Upper West Side location opens on Wednesday, but rather than hiring more staff, the book store has fired a dozen of their recently rehired staffers. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD traffic agent Jeanisidor Jean Baptiste was arrested in Brooklyn after an investigation uncovered years of alleged sexual abuse to a five-year-old girl from 2008 through 2012. The victim is now 17. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If the NYPD is called on to keep the peace during rival Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter protests, who do you think they’ll defend? On Sunday in Bay Ridge, the NYPD made two arrests after Blue Lives Matter protesters attacked the Black Lives Matter protesters. Both men arrested were Black. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Sex workers joined together outside of the Stonewall Inn on July 9 to rally against police brutality and send a message that sex work is work. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

A new bill is calling for a ban of the NYPD’s use of drones for recording or collecting data on the general public in open spaces. The bill also restricts the use of drones without a warrant and bans facial recognition, and is sponsored by State Senator Jessica Ramos. (NY1)

It was a few days of good news about Covid-19 infections in New York, so it’s time to tamp that down a bit. There’s a new spike in infections in New Yorkers in their 20s. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s nice to think that the city really had zero Covid-19 deaths on Saturday, but that’s probably not true. The way the city assigns death dates means that we won’t actually know for a few days. Over the last week, there have been 12 confirmed Covid-19 deaths, and one probable death each day. (Jen Carlson and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Schools can reopen in the fall for regions in phase four and have infection rates below 5%, according to the guidelines set forward by Governor Cuomo. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s not all good news for schools. If the city’s infection rate surges past 9% later in August or after the school year starts, schools will be forced to close. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

For months following Amazon’s decision to pull out, we felt forgotten and it appeared that our goal of creating a Long Island City waterfront that would empower our community and create a significant number of jobs was lost. Then last year, a new process emerged.
-Carol Wilkins, April Simpson-Taylor, Claudia Coger & Annie Cotton-Morris, NYCHA Tenant Leaders: Where Amazon Never Arrived, New Opportunity Arises for Gotham Gazette

6 Manhattan homes with their own private pools and hot tubs. Must be nice. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

It was only a matter of time. A driver crashed his car into an outdoor dining area on Roosevelt Ave in Queens. Four diners and a server were injured. (Justine Re for NY1)

16 places to pick up food news Prospect Park has a few good gems, even if a few of them are laughably far away and other picks ignore where the park’s entrances are. (Nikko Duren & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Micah Eames for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for April 4, 2019 – The “De Blasio Does His Best Cuomo Impression” Edition

New Yorkers are united in their opposition to the mayor’s presidential hopes, Manhattan’s accidental leaning tower, Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle”, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

12 new art installations to check out in Apriln. (Untapped Cities)

Queens Councilman Eric Ulrich is calling on the mayor to fire the Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Steve Banks in a change.org petition. Ulrich says Banks’ failure to address chronic homelessness is the base reason for the petition. (QNS)

The mayor announced an “expert panel” to fix the mess that is the BQE construction. The panel will be lead by the CEO of a construction trade lobbying group and include people from a Google/Alphabet subsidiary, the Regional Planning Association, NYU, multiple trade and construction groups, and others. The panel is light on urban planning experts and will be tasked with finding an outcome that is “in the best interests of everyone.” (Gothamist)

It seems Rock & Roll is an acceptable art form now, getting its first exhibition at the Met. (Gothamist)

Donald Trump’s first Manhattan real estate project pioneered the tax incentives whose lineage can be traced all the way to the recent imploded Amazon deal. (Curbed)

Yesterday we learned that we’re paying the highest taxes in the country, and now there’s an indication that the city is over-taxing hundreds of small buildings accidentally, in some cases 4x the appropriate rate. (The Real Deal)

Taking a dip in the East River anytime soon? Here’s a field guide to what you might find in the water. (Gothamist)

If you’re interested in working the 2020 Census, there will be a job fair at Queens Borough Hall on May 1. (QNS)

The list of the world’s best hospitals includes three hospitals in the city. (Patch)

A look in photos of what is left of “Italian Williamsburg.” (NY Times)

Here’s a look at the OMNY subway NFC systems in the wild. If the demo iPhones in Apple stores can always be found to have fecal matter on them, imagine how gross these screens are going to get. (Gothamist)

Something is fishy about the city’s purchase of buildings for $173 million when their first estimate valued them at $50 million. Also, the landlords are represented by a lawyer who is helping the mayor raise money to fly around the country pretending anyone wants to see him run for president. (NY Times)

As a reminder, 76% of New Yorkers don’t want the mayor to run for president. Only 42% approve of the job he’s doing in New York. (amNY)

Why does no one want the mayor to run for president? Maybe it’s a moment like this, where he blamed the federal government for all of the city’s problems. (NY Post)

Manhattan has its own leaning tower. A 58-story condo on Maiden Lane is leaning North by three inches as a result of a faulty foundation, according to a lawsuit. Construction is still continuing, despite complaints. (Gothamist)

638 of the city’s bridges are considered “structurally deficient,” which include the Brooklyn Bridge and the Throgs Neck. (Patch)

In the last four years, Uber spent $2 million lobbying in favor of congestion pricing. (NY Post)

A body of a 53-year-old man was discovered in the water near the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle.” How Doyers Street’s gang violence earned it that nickname. (Streeteasy)

A look at The Shed, Hudson Yards’ cultural center which has more configurations than a transformer. (Engadget)

20 tasty Thai restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The city’s comptroller wants the Department of Transportation to take control of the NYC Ferry system from private company Hornblower after learning how astronomically high the city subsidizes each rider’s trip. (Curbed)

After a 10-year fight with the MTA, Luis Colon was awarded $22 million after needing spinal fusion surgery from a fall from a makeshift platform on the Henry Hudson Bridge. (NY Post)

Take a look at this insane plan from the 1940s to build an airport on top of buildings from 24th to 71st Streets. (Viewing NYC)

The best spring break food and drinks. (amNY)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.