The Briefly for June 27, 2019 – The “If the City is One Big Mall, Are We All Mallrats?” Edition

Tiffany Cabán’s victory in Queens, The New Museum outlines its expansion, the MTA takes a dump on the morning commute and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the election for Queens DA, despite Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s unwillingness to concede for many hours. (amNY)

Tiffany Cabán’s victory, aided by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, was another failure of the Quens Democratic establishment as the borough continues to push even further to the left. (Politico)

Five things to know about Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

20 things Tiffany Cabán promised to do if elected as Queens DA, including declining to prosecute many non-violent crimes, change the charge standard for misdemeanors, hold the NYPD accountable, decriminalize marijuana, and more. (Gotham Gazette)

Councilwoman Farah Louis won her primary to all but secure the 45th District City Council seat, formerly held by Jumaane Williams. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York City isn’t becoming a mall. We’ve been in denial long enough, it’s time admit that New York City is a mall. All of the “retail hubs” like the ones at the World Trade Center, Essex Crossing, PIer 17, and the Hudson Yards? They’re all malls. (Curbed)

The 10 oldest churches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Those bus signs with the timers in them are great, except that 20% of them don’t work. (The City)

The Yankees are honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with a plaque in Monument Park. This isn’t the first non-Yankee plaque, with others honoring Nelson Mandela, the victims and rescue workers of 9/11, and popes Paul VI, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI. (Huff Post)

The Rent Guidelines Board approved rent increases of 1.5% for one-year leases and 2.5% for two-year leases for rent-stabilized apartments. (Gothamist)

19 fantastic LGBTQ bars in New York City. (Eater)

How to dress for a New York summer, from costume designer Luca Mosca, who happens to be John Wick’s tailor. (Gothamist)

Can you imagine the burden of always being right? There have been nearly 2,500 complaints of racial bias in the city since 2014 and the NYPD has not investigated a single one because the department hasn’t found anything wrong. (Gothamist)

The MTA Board is looking to ban repeat criminals from using the subway. Is it possible? “We can’t ban anyone right now and we won’t be able to.” Good thing the board is tackling the most important things first. (Patch)

The B, D, and F had awful mornings on Tuesday, with some trains sitting with closed doors for 45 minutes. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo, who says he doesn’t control the MTA, directed the MTA to create a task force to examine speed across the entire subway system, MetroNorth and the LIRR. (Politico)

40 years is a lot to do anything, which makes Peter Tsoumas’s run selling flowers at the First Ave L train station monumental. He has his first six months of retirement planned. After that, he’s open for suggestions. (Bedford + Bowery)

Step inside The Bureau of General Services — Queer Division, the bookstore on the second floor of The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Center on W 13th. (amNY)

A-Rod is slowly trying to become the A-Rod of NYC real estate with a plan to purchase multiple multi-family homes in the city. (6sqft)

Employment in Lower Manhattan has reached pre-9/11 levels for the first time since the attacks, according to the Alliance for Downtown New York. (Chelsea Now)

An updated list of what art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

The man who gave us I Heart NY was Milton Glaser, a New Yorker from the East Village. Another piece of work from Glaser is the murals of the Astor Place station. (GVSHP)

New York’s richest person shouldn’t surprise you. (Patch)

You’ll find Fredd E. “Tree” Sequoia behind the bar of the Stonewall Inn, the same man who was behind the bar on June 28, 1969. (amNY)

It’s been a years-long fight, but the Elizabeth Street Garden in Nolita will become affordable housing for seniors after approval from the city council. (Curbed)

Perry Rosen is one of Brooklyn’s last jukebox and pinball repairmen. (Viewing NYC)

Despite rejection by the community board and objection from Staten Island Borough President Jimmy Oddo, Staten Island’s Bay Street’s rezoning was approved by the city council, guaranteeing to change the neighborhood. (Curbed)

The Islanders will continue to split their home games between Long Island and the Barclays Center, being in the unique position to disappoint multiple crowds throughout the season. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The New Museum revealed its plans for its 2022 expansion. (EV Grieve)

With the state’s 2019 legislative session over, what’s next for Democrats in 2020? (Politico)

Where to Eat and Drink in Dumbo. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 20, 2019 – The “Legal Marijuana is a Dead Cause in New York State” Edition

NY1 is hit with an age and gender discrimination lawsuit, the electric scooter and ebike bill passed, most Ricky’s locations are closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Port Authority’s plan to build an AirTrain to LaGuardia has one key flaw: the MTA. Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that states the MTA simply isn’t ready, to no one’s surprise. (amNY)

It’ll be hard to go anywhere in the city towards the end of the month without spotting a rainbow flag. NYC & Co released a list of the buildings across all boroughs that will be lit with rainbows and their schedules. Some, like City Hall, will be lit from June 10 – 30, while some like Bloomberg’s Headquarters and MSG will be lit on June 30. (Curbed)

Five anchorwomen are suing NY1 for age and gender discrimination. The lawsuit betrays the image NY1 wants the city to believe. While Pat Kiernan’s 20th anniversary with the channel was celebrated on-air, while Roma Torre’s 25th anniversary was marked by nothing. Ms. Torre’s salary also happens to be half of Mr. Kiernan’s. (NY Times)

Legal marijuana is dead for this legislative session. According to Liz Krueger, the state senator who sponsored the bill, they “ran out of time.” (Gothamist)

The reimagining of Penn Station has begun with new entrances on 7th Ave. (Untapped Cities)

Did you know that subway elevator attendants still exist? The elevator ride at the St. Nicolas Ave station rides the same 181-foot route all night, non-stop. Gothamist rode shotgun for a full overnight shift. (Gothamist)

The Culinary Institute of America is starting an Anthony Bourdain scholarship. (Grub Street)

Following up on that “beach” Battery Park photo from earlier this week, meet Brian Shea, the master planner of Battery Park City. (Untapped Cities)

Ricky’s may be closing their NYC stores with the exception of two. Even the city’s innovator when it comes to wigs, hair dye, sex toys, makeup and more isn’t immune to the Amazon effect. (Jezebel)

17 tourist trap restaurants that are actually good. (Eater)

Get out into the world. That’s the advice from Wigstock founder Lady Bunny, who worries that the LGBTQ community is abandoning their safe spaces in favor of social media. (amNY)

10 essential tools every apartment should have. Time to hit your neighborhood hardware store. (StreetEasy)

Would it surprise you to learn that a confusing bar slash “>bar slash vegetarian restaurant was also a late night dance club is in Bushwick? (Gothamist)

If you met Giblet on the street in the East Village, you’d know. Giblet is a friendly, one-year-old pig that seems to melt everyone who sees it’s heart. (Bedford + Bowery)

Jennifer Lopez an Alex Rodriguez sold the apartment where A-Rod’s viral toilet photo was taken. They have since purchased blinds. (Curbed)

There were hundreds of summonses issued during the city’s crackdown on measles, but only one fine issued and that fine was the result of someone who skipped their hearing. (Gothamist)

The next artist to head for a Broadway residency is Regina Spektor. (amNY)

An argument for why Brooklynites should be voting for surrogate judges on June 25. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to Tuesday’s Queens DA election. (Gothamist)

Does any New Yorker not have nightmares about an air conditioner falling on them in the sidewalk? Even if there’s only one record of a falling air conditioner in the last five years, you should be following directions putting that thing in your window. (Patch)

The legislature passed a bill to remove the electric scooter and bike ban, but don’t celebrate just yet. The city still has to write its own rules and regulations before they’re completely legal to ride. (Mashable)

Once the police and Walmart show up to support your cause, can you still claim to be part of the counter-culture? The Pride March is often criticized for the priority given to corporations, the party atmosphere, and police involvement. This is where the Reclaim Pride Coalition’s Queer Liberation March steps in, promising an attitude similar to the original Pride March. The Queer Liberation March happens 9am on the day of the Pride March and has banned floats, corporate involvement, and asked for minimal NYPD involvement with no barricades to allow people to join and leave the protest at will. The Pride March bans anyone from spontaneously joining. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’re in Downtown Brooklyn and, honestly, it can be difficult to know what the hell there is to do around there outside of walk around. Here’s a guide of what to do and eat. (amNY)

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The Briefly for May 20, 2019 – The “Casting Literal and Figurative Shade” Edition

A legendary pizza place is temporarily closed, Scott Stringer is making his mayoral candidacy clear, the NYPL’s secrets, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are along the 3, 6, A, D and E lines, but double check before you go anywhere after 10pm. (Subway Weekender)

The BQE Rehab panel is asking for feedback. If you want to provide your feedback, there’s a phone number and a form for the kind of constructive, polite feedback New Yorkers are known for. (BQE Panel)

The developer of the building that would cast literal shade on the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is attempting a char offensive campaign to promote the site’s affordable housing. I’m not sure there’s a New Yorker gullible enough to believe that a company would pay $75 million for a plot of land and then build 1,500 apartments (50% would be “affordable”) because they believe in affordable housing. (Gothamist)

From the pneumatic tubes, to the book train, to the actual visible history you can see in the building, ten secrets of the NYPL’s main branch on 42nd St. (Untapped Cities)

Not on the list is the number of empty floors of stacks. There are some parts of the NYPL that can’t safely store its research collection, which has been moved into storage underneath Bryant Park, where its 11 million book collection is safe. (NY Times)

Wave hello to the city’s newest bars and restaurants. (amNY)

The restaurants ordered closed last week, including surprising inclusions Barcade on 24th and Di Fara Pizza in Midwood. (Patch)

Di Fara says it will be reopening today. (Eater)

If you need more proof that the MTA wasn’t prepared for the L Train Slowdown, the initial cuts to the M14’s route have been altered with this “final compromise.” (Curbed)

35 years after opening, Bookbook in Greenwich Village is closing. It’s not the city’s rising rents, but retirement that’s calling the owners. (NY Times)

This Gothamist piece about a protest from contractors over the proposed rent reforms takes a turn midway through, accusing real estate and landlord groups of astroturfing the hearings. (Gothamist)

630 Fifth Avenue. Quickly, what’s the nearest corner? Take off the last number and you’ve got 63. Divide it by 2 and you have 31. Add 20 because it’s over 600 and the answer is 51st St. Finding a cross street used to involve a little math. (Ephemeral New York)

The city lost 7,500 affordable apartments in 2018, but gained 11,800. There’s a catch. 80% of the new apartments’ affordability status is temporary. (The Real Deal)

Brooklyn’s bra whisperer. (NY City Lens)

The Bronx’s Tibbetts Brook was “moved” underground by Robert Moses. As a result of Robert Moses’s brilliant idea, the surrounding area floods when it rains, the flooding overwhelms the sewers and overflow has to be dumped into the Harlem River. The Parks Department has a plan to bring the brook back above ground to remedy this, but a private rail company stands in their way. (Gothamist)

If you’re unfamiliar with the Combined Sewage Overflow system, the city collects rainwater in its sewer system, and when the combination of rainwater, human waste, and whatever else on the street overload the sewer system, it dumps out in the NYC waters in 13 locations, dumping 377 million gallons of raw sewage into our waters. (Newsweek)

This is why the city closely monitors the water at the city’s beaches for sewage runoff. Beaches were on warning for 49 days in 2018 with one closure. The Swim Guide and website is also available for water condition reports. (nyc.gov and The Brooklyn Eagle)

Notify NYC now offers transit alerts. Why would you want transit alerts from the Department of Emergency Management, a city agency, instead of the MTA, a state agency, or one of the dozens of transit apps? No idea. A quick look shows that the Notify system doesn’t have the same breadth of coverage as @NYCTsubway on twitter. (amNY)

It shouldn’t be to anyone’s surprise at the width of the chasm of difference between the rezoning plans of the Department of City Planning and the Bushwick Community Plan for Bushwick’s future. (Bklyner)

Normal people put up curtains or shades in their bathrooms so people can’t watch them poop. Alex Rodriguez does not appear to be a normal person, or else this photo of A-Rod taking a deuce wouldn’t be on the internet. (Gothamist)

Morgenstern’s is adding a twist to its flagship ice cream location on Houston: booze. (Eater)

The most popular baby names in NYC are Liam, Noah, Jacob, Emma, and Olivia. Not many future kinds named Bran. (Patch)

Turns out the TWA hotel wasn’t actually as ready for visitors like it should have been. (Gothamist)

If you want to attract birds, here are the plants for you to grow. (Patch)

. Turns out the MTA is as good at maintaining its toilets as it is its subways. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard ferry stop opens today. (Brooklyn Paper)

Scott Stringer, who has clearly been making a visibility play to run for mayor, says a new tax on the city’s largest businesses could expand subsidies for childcare for 84,000 kids younger than 3. (Patch)

The best cocktails under $10. (Thrillist)

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