The Briefly for May 9, 2019 – The “Is This Where They Dump the Bodies on Law & Order?” Edition

The NYPD’s use of chokeholds continues, there has been no state movement on legal marijuana, a boozy Taco Bell in the West Village, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The City Council pass a legislative package with 17 bills aimed at protecting tenants’ rights. (amNY)

The hunt for the city’s best cheesecake. (Grub Street)

We are six weeks away from the second 2019 deadline for the state’s legislature to do something about legalizing recreational marijuana. In order to make it work, the governor is going to have to start throwing his weight around. (Gothamist)

New York is often shaped in the minds of visitors by the shows and movies that portray it. From the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Seinfeld to Law and Order, every non-New Yorker’s New York is an imaginary city. (Curbed)

The life of a polyamourous Hasidic swordfighter in, yes, how did you know, Bushwick. (Bushwick)

The top 10 secrets of Barnard College. (Untaped Cities)

“All of the pre-made food looks so sad.” The reviews of the city’s Amazon Go store are in. (Gothamist)

The NYPD spent $35 million trying to retrain officers after Eric Garner died a chokehold. Record show that chokeholds are still being used by NYPD officers, very few face discipline, some have lost vacation time, and none have been fired. (NY Times)

Is the West Village ready for a boozy Taco Bell? (Commercial Observer)

Don’t pet the dog. All the things you’ve never asked commuters with service dogs and what they want you to know. (Gothamist)

M & S Schmalberg, the makers of silk flowers for over a century, gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

The Prospect Park Perimeter is getting a new bike lane along Ocean Ave. (6sqft)

On an intersection, just one block from the Brooklyn Museum, the rats have begun a hostile takeover. (Gothamist)

28 portraits of this year’s Tony nominees. (NY Times)

176 pounds of cocaine was seized, worth nearly $3 million, in the city’s recent drug bust that resulted in 19 arrests. (Patch)

In New York State, you can be arrested for not paying a parking ticket, which becomes part of your criminal record. State lawmakers are looking to change that. (NY Times)

No keys? No way. Hell’s Kitchen tenants sued and won the rights to have physical keys for their apartments after a landlord installed a keyless entry system that they claimed violated their right to privacy. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wondered but have been too scared to ask where the Museum Mile is or what’s a part of it, this Miracle Mile guide is your answer. (NYCGo)

New York City is the second worst place to work if you don’t have at least a bachelor’s degree. (Patch)

In praise of the ten-egg breakfast. (Grub Street)

The New York Times reviews The Met’s ‘Camp,’ calling it “Frustrating.” (NY Times)

The city is looking at banning “ghost” guns. Not the Ghostbusters’ proton packs, but gun frames to which other components attach to. They lack serial numbers, don’t require background checks and would allow you to build an untraceable gun. (Gothamist)

From Fox and Friends to Famiglia Pizza: The lowlights of NYC: Donald Trump’s New York. (Huff Post)

13 places to have post afternoon tea in NYC. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 8, 2019 – The “If You Have $27,500 to Spend on Rent” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Vision Zero Design push, the measles spreads to public schools, Bluestockings Bookstore launches a membership program, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A Brooklyn building collapsed after a car slammed into it. Of course, it was caught on video and shared to Twitter. No one was home and the driver tried to flee the scene but was caught by the neighborhood patrol. (Gothamist)

A look at Bjork’s ‘Cornucopia,’ which was previewed at The Shed. (BrooklynVegan)

These “What X,000 rents in NYC right now” posts come pretty regularly, but let’s take a look at what you could get if you have $8,000 a month to spend on rent. (Curbed)

Forget $8,000 a month. How about $27,500 a month for this West Village townhouse? (6sqft)

This is the smallest theater in NYC. Take a peek. (Untapped Cities)

Inside The Costume Institute’s CAMP exhibit at The Met. (Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there are neighborhoods where home prices are dropping. It might not be by much, but take what you can get. (Patch)

A Florida Man story ends on the L Train. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you only need a photo. Like this one of Lawrence Fishburne looking cool as hell on a street corner in 1989. (Viewing NYC)

Corey Johnson is going to push forward the Vision Design bill this month, putting him at odds with the mayor. The bill would force the DOT to develop a checklist of street design elements that enhance safety. For each eligible street, the DOT would be required to state which elements were applied, or why not if it wasn’t. Accountability isn’t the city government’s strong suit. (Streetsblog)

Johnson’s not short on presenting big ideas, it’s been two months since his “the city should take over the MTA” plan, which has been largely ignored and not discussed at all by all prominent players involved in state and city government. (Second Ave Sagas)

Amazon is building in Queens, but it’s a $5.6 factory with no high-paying tech jobs. (6sqft)

Amazon’s also coming to Manhattan, but with an Amazon Go store in the Brookfield Mall in downtown Manhattan. (Tribeca Citizen)

Six female corrections officers were arrested and arraigned in New York State Supreme Court following allegations they performed illegal strip searches on women attempting to visit their loved ones in a Manhattan jail. (The Root)

The ultimate guide to the High Line, from the basics to the history to the future. (Curbed)

Explore the city’s worst evictor landlords with the Right to Counsel NYC Coalition, JustFix.nyc, and the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project’s new website and interactive map. (Gothamist)

The Grub Street guide to Mother’s Day. (Grub Street)

Forget DC, Albany could allow Congress to see the president’s federal tax returns. (NY Times)

A guide for tipping in NYC. Send this to anyone visiting so you don’t have to answer their questions. (TripSavvy)

Sharpen your skills with the “Knife Lady of Chelsea Market.” (ABC 7)

Because the city will never be free from the grip of special elections, here are the eight candidates vying for Jumane Williams’s seat on the city council. (amNY)

It’s the seventh edition of NYCxDesign, here’s what to see. (NY Times)

The measles outbreak has grown to 466 cases, expanding into the city’s public schools. The infected students had religious exemptions from the vaccine. The city has given 84 summonses for failing to comply with the vaccine mandate. (amNY)

A photo of a fatberg in a water treatment plant should be enough of a reminder to stop flushing your “flushable” wipes. (StreetEasy)

Bluestockings Bookstore, the radical bookstore, fair trade cafe, and activist center in the Lower East Side, is starting a membership program on the event of their twentieth anniversary to stay a radical outpost in a capitalist world. (Bedford + Bowery)

The best seafood restaurants and dishes in the city. (Thrillist)

10,000 Uber drivers in the city plan to strike on Wednesday morning in solidarity with worldwide drivers’ protest of Ubers SEC filing. (amNY)

The first trans-Atlantic flight was 100 years ago today, originating from Fort Tilden in Queens. It was eight years before Charles Lindburg’s nonstop solo flight. It was six Navy and Coast Guard crewmen and it took three weeks in their NC-4 seaplane. (NY Times)

This week’s featured walk from GoRoam: Scenic Chelsea and Greenwich Village (GoRoam)

The Briefly for May 1, 2019 – The “Wouldn’t We All Love to Ban Tour Guides With Groups” Edition

ApplePay comes to the MTA this summer, Tony Award nominations are in, the Dept of Education is accused of failing to protect students from sexual assault, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The mayor’s “Turning the Tide on the Homeless” program is facing criticism in a new report from the Coalition for the Homeless. The city’s homeless population has grown by 10% for each year Mayor de Blasio has been in office. January was a record-breaking year for the number of men, women, and children spending each night in a shelter at 64,000. (Gothamist)

The list of Tony nominations are in. This year’s big winner is “Hadestown” with 14 nominations. (NY Times)

A new lawsuit filed this week accuses the NYC Department of Education of failing to protect students against sexual assaults, file official complaints, conduct proper investigations, and support survivors dealing with trauma. Legal Services NYC filed the lawsuit on behalf of four girls aged 12 to 18. (Gothamist)

The National Park Service took an action on Liberty Island that most of us wish we could take anywhere we need to go: banned tour guides. (NY Times)

The Essex Market opened in 1940 at the behest of Mayor Fiorello Laguardia. This May the market’s original location closes to move across the street. (Untapped Cities)

“The one that I almost leapt over the counter to get was a quesadilla panino.” Eater’s weekly sandwich column from Robert Sietsema got a bit intense. (Eater)

Coney Island is getting another music venue, located in the center of the Coney Island Art Walls. “Amuse” will have a capacity of 4,000 and have programming between Memorial and Labor Day. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking to make an appreciable change in the city, the charter review process is your opportunity. (Curbed)

Was the body found under the Verrazzano Bridge an NYC Marathon runner? The body under the Verrazzano was one of two bodies found in the city’s waters last weekend. (Gothamist)

An Absolut Ban. An executive order from the mayor put the kibosh on newsstands, bus shelters, and LinkNYC alcohol ads, sponsorship or branding. The city doesn’t expect to lose any revenue as a result of the ban. (Patch)

What’s going on with the hundreds of “unfounded” rape cases in Queens? The 14.2% of reported rapes in Queens being unfounded is significantly higher than the city’s other boroughs. (QNS)

The problem with the city’s plan to divert L train riders to the J and M trains is that the J and M trains are just as reliable as they’ve ever been. Overnight Monday a switch problem brought both train lines to a halt, effectively turning the L train slowdown into a full-on East River shutdown. (Gothamist)

Today is the anniversary of the Empire State Building’s opening in 1931. A piece of trivia to unlease on unsuspecting people in your life. (GVSHP)

Speaking of trivia… tonight’s the night for JOHN TRVIALTA at Parklife:

Amazon is still coming to Queens but in the form of a new distribution center in Woodside. (The City)

Bronx Councilmember Andy King was accused of sexual harassment for the second time in two years. King is refusing to cooperate with the City Council. (Patch)

Billionaires’ Row is missing something significant. Billionaires. Nearly half of the apartments are unsold, including some buildings seven years old that remain half empty. (Curbed)

Take a look, because there are new renderings of Brooklyn’s Wegmans. (6sqft)

The Queens Library got a six-month extension on their Court Square lease to remain in the building through March 31, 2020. (LIC Post)

The NYPD found a new way to make biking or walking over the Brooklyn Bridge a nightmare. (Streetsblog)

What’s that tree outside your building? There’s a map for that. The New York City Street Tree Map is the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street trees. (Viewing NYC)

The art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

Nomiki Konst is under fire for questionable practices and payments during her Public Advocate campaign and is accused of being a “plan from the right.” You’d be forgiven if you couldn’t remember her or her campaign, she only garnered 2% of the vote. Konst’s campaign manager came forward about questionable donations, which were publicly matched, and even more questionable invoices. Konst has attempted to distance herself from the potential scandal, but she served as her own treasurer, which makes her legally responsible for her campaign’s financial system. (Politico)

Soon your apartment may be powered by poop! No, we’re not talking about your roommate. (Gothamist)

An appellate court upheld the city’s measles vaccination mandate on Monday, denying a request for a temporary restraining order by a group of anti-vaxxer parents as the number of confirmed cases in New York City rose to 423. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With all the measles talk going around, you’re not alone if you’re wondering if you should get yourself a booster shot as an adult. (NY Times)

Story update. Remember how the Board of Elections put all the city’s voter rolls online for anyone to look at? Well, that’s over. The BOE realized that maybe posting all of our names, addresses and party affiliations online wasn’t the best idea. (NY Times)

The MTA will begin support for ApplePay in the “early summer,” as the OMNY system is scheduled to go live on some 4, 5, and 6 train stops on May 31. (Engadget)

The latest city landmark debate is over Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of popular music. The conversation made a surprising turn towards some of the racism expressed in songs created there. (Curbed)

The “NOT GONNA SUCK YOUR DICK” graffiti tag is getting attention. (Bowery Boogie)

Featured walk: The essential Upper West Side. (GoRoam)

Where to go if you want to eat a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

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