The Briefly for July 7, 2020 – The “Long Island City is Empty” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Looking at phase three and phase four, Mayor de Blasio “doubles down” on crime for the second time this year, the NYPD protects a statue 24/7, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 81˚
Humid and partly cloudy throughout the day.

There’s mounting scientific evidence that Covid-19 can hang in stagnant air on tiny droplets for hours. Wear your masks and keep your distance while indoors, because they are just as important as washing your hands. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Everything you need to know about phase three of NYC’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There are no current plans to allow the city’s music venues or movie theaters to open and indoor dining remains on hold. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Let’s look ahead to what we need to know about phase four. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

This week the absentee ballots form the June 23 election will begin to be counted. Statistically speaking, if you voted, you voted absentee. Here are why your absentee ballots may be invalid. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

It’s time for the latest battle in the city’s ongoing war against mosquitos. The city will begin spraying non-residential wetlands on Wednesday morning. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

What else is the city losing in the annual budget? On top of the Fair Fares program, an OT cut in the Department of Corrections by $66 million, and the Department of Social Services losing 700 employees? The deer sterilization project, Sunday litter collection, and two-hour parking meters will become more expensive, to start. (Bobby Cuza for NY1)

Nearly 60% of condo units built in Long Island City, Queens, since 2018 remain unsold. Seems like no one wants to pay $1.5 million for an apartment under one thousand square feet. (The Real Deal)

“In these uncertain times” isn’t just a phrase you’re extremely tired of hearing in commercials. It’s easier than ever yo find a short-term rental in NYC. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

The message is simple: Rename the Barclays Center after Jackie Robinson. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The High Line is reopening next week, but you’ll need a (free) reservation to gain access. Reservations start at 10 am on July 9. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Plans: Check out the long-awaited revamp of Woodside’s Sohncke Square. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

I want to feel safe, and to know that others do, too. I want their feelings to be validated by real safety. The harsh reality is that many systems and institutions in our society have failed. Historically marginalized communities are waiting—we stand together, on the streets and in our homes, watching this fire burn night after night.
– Aleina D. for Gothamist, “Burn The Car, We’ll Find A New Way There”: Thoughts On Protests From NYC Teens

A press conference with Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, Congressional candidate Jamaal Bowman, Iesha Sekou from Street Corner Resources, and anti-violence groups was interrupted by protesters. Rather than escalate the situation, the protesters were invited to speak alongside the organizers. Everyone was calling for a solution to end the city’s recent gun violence. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

July 4th weekend was a violent one in the city, with 64 people shot. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The NYPD blamed bail reform for the rise in violence, which is a tired refrain from the NYPD, anecdotal at best, and a claim that can be verified. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

“This is something we have to double down on to address.” Mayor de Blasio’s solution for the spike in violence in the city is to beef up neighborhood policing and work with clergy, local groups, and Cure Violence groups. “Doubling down” is a favorite phrase of the mayor’s. He “doubled down” on social distancing in April, “doubled down” on fighting crime in February, “doubled down” on improving schools for Black and Hispanic children in June of 2019, “doubled down” on efforts to help the homeless in April of 2019, and “doubled down” on Vision Zero in February of 2019. How many of those are still issues? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The NYPD has deployed 2 officers for 24 hours a day and seven days a week to protect the Christopher Columbus statue in Astoria. Hard to believe some people think the NYPD’s budget is too big. (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

The NYPD hired multiple companies to attempt to fix its relationship with Black and Latino New Yorkers. The companies they hired had one thing in common: They were all white-owned. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Photos: Lower Manhattan’s new colorful Black Lives Matter mural. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In February, the Mets rejected a $2.6 billion sale price. Now the Wilpons have opened up to bids and “bid indications appear weak” and under $2 billion. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Yankees and Mets 2020 schedule has been released. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

A failed Ferris wheel, a minor league baseball stadium with a team that’s scheduled to be dropped, a $350 million mall with more than half the stores closed, a quarter-billion-dollar mixed-use development with no timeline for completion. The billion-dollar Staten Island shoreline is sputtering. (Clifford Michel for The City)

A fast-growing fire in East Flatbush killed a boy and his grandfather early Monday morning. Five firefighters were injured in the rescue, none of the injuries serious. The rescue was complicated because the house was a Collyer’s Mansion. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

A Collyer’s Mansion is a home so full of stuff that it presents a danger to firefighters who enter in an emergency and named for a pair of brothers infamous for their compulsive hoarding and paranoia. Their home was a series of traps and boxes and when it was cleaned out after the brothers’ death, there were over 120 tons of possessions and trash removed. (Harlem World Magazine)

NYC is the fifth-worst city in America for first-time home buyers, according to a new study from WalletHub. They used 26 metrics, including affordability, cost of living, tax rates, and more. (Nikki Gaskins for Patch)

A new three-acre portion of Brooklyn Bridge Park opened next to Pier 2. Once the plaza under the Brooklyn Bridge opens, Brooklyn Bridge Park will be considered “complete.” Don’t get too excited, construction doesn’t start until December 2021. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Amy Cooper, the asshole in Central Park who called the police on a Black bird watcher, will be facing misdemeanor charges for filing a false police report. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

It wasn’t readmitting patients into nursing homes, but employees and visitors caused the horrible spread of Covid-19 into the state’s nursing homes according to a new study from the state, Mount Sinai Hospital, and Northwell Health. Governor Cuomo has been catching shit for his decisions around nursing homes and being given the blame for deaths, but a combination of this study and New York’s low death per capita in nursing homes compared to other states would suggest the anger is misplaced. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The former Jeffrey Epstein companion Ghislaine Maxwell was transferred to the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn from New Hampshire. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

That didn’t take long. Less than a month after the sale of their company, the founders of Ample Hills are out. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Three art galleries in the city are opening this week with phase three. Here’s a look at the exhibits, which you’ll need to reserve time in advance, wear a mask, and socially distance from everyone else present. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Farewell to China Chalet in Chinatown, an LGBTQ-friendly business, lunch spot for the working crowd, an underground party spot for NYU kids, and well-known celebrity hang out. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Farewell to Beverly’s on Essex. After seven years, the strains of the Covid-19 pandemic have forced the bar’s closure. (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

Farewell to Cranberry’s in Brooklyn Heights, which had been in the neighborhood for 42 years. For each restaurant or bar or coffee shop that you read about closing, there are countless others that don’t get a writeup from a local news site. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

15 breweries for drinking locally. (Jenny Hart and Liz Provencher for Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 24, 2020 – The “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The possible end of the to-go cocktail, fighting white supremacy in museums, Ample Hills finds a buyer, the City Council move to open beaches, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 83˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tired of waiting for the mayor, the City Council is set to introduce a bill this week that would force the beaches open. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Last night’s primary and election results. It’s still too early to declare winners due to the high volume of absentee voting, but Donovan Richards is leading for Queens Borough President, Jamaal Bowman has a sizable lead over incumbent Eliot Engel, Ritchie Torres is leading the pack in House District 15, AOC is cruising to victory, Yvette Clarke has a large lead, and Jerry Nadler is winning. (NY1)

How did the Democratic primary and election go yesterday?

Over 229,806 absentee ballots distributed in Manhattan for the Democratic primary, only 13% had been received before June 23. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio is tackling the city’s biggest problem. Obviously, that problem is Alternate Side Parking. For some reason, the mayor is making ASP more difficult to understand, only demanding that cars be moved once a week instead of multiple times. Of course, this doesn’t apply on streets where cars are only moved once a week. If this sounds complicated, it’s because the mayor took a subject that only pertains to 45% of households in the city and made it complicated. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Kudos to the people who chose to protest the mayor’s inaction on the amount of fireworks regularly being set off by sitting outside Gracie Mansion all night while laying on car horns. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where are the illegal fireworks? Take a look at a map of the ballooning complaints across the city through the month of June. (Sydney Pereira, Clarisa Diaz, Jen Chung, Jake Dobkin, and Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

The mayor announced a crack down on fireworks, but don’t expect any relief on the nightly displays across the city. The mayor’s approach is mostly supply chain based and not enforcement based. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, this may be the king. The mayor announced that instead of a July 4th fireworks display, Macy’s will set off fireworks for five minutes, unannounced, on a nightly basis for every night next week and a highlights package will air on July 4th. This is the literal plot of the 30 Rock episode “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” and it ends poorly. This truly is the Mayor de Blasio of fireworks displays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Layleen Polanco, the trans woman who died in a Rikers Island solitary confinement cell last year, was pushed there by jailers over a doctor’s objections and despite her seizure disorder, according to a new report from thecdty’s Board of Corrections. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The complaint history of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold caused the death of Eric Garner, has been released and, surprise surprise, Daniel Panteleo was a piece of shit with seven misconduct complaints before using an illegal chokehold on Garner in 2014. (NY1)

The NYPD Tasered George Zapantis to death. Video was taken of Zapantis being taken from his home with hands tied behind his back has surfaced while four or five officers tased him and screamed at him not to resist arrest. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The city’s criminal courts have a 39,200 case backlog right. The city’s justice is on hold and people waiting for trial are sitting in jail cells. (Alan Feuer, Nicole Hong, Benjamin Weiser and Jan Ransom for The City)

Museums can open their doors, if all goes according to plan, on July 20. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has plans to open on August 29. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The Met Breuer will be closing for good in July, with The Frick moving in while its home on the Upper East Side gets renovated. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Museum of Jewish Heritage is laying off over 40% of its staff due to the Covid-19 pandemic. (Colin Moynihan for NY Times)

“We write to inform you that your covert and overt white supremacy that has benefited the institution, through the unrecognized dedication and hard labor of Black/Brown employees, with the expectation that we remain complacent with the status quo, is over.”
An open letter to New York City’s Cultural Institutions

A look at the heroic efforts of the people who step in to help the pets of New Yorkers who become seriously ill with coronavirus. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Over a quarter-million of the city’s food jobs were lost since March, with only about 14,000 returning to work so far. It’s the lowest level of hospitality employment since before 1992. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The city’s cocktail-takeout law expires this weekend. Without action from Governor Cuomo, this is the end of the to-go cocktail. (Erika Adams for Eater)

There are only two kinds of people in the world, according to Serena Day, those who like Van Leeuwen and those who like Ample Hills. Which are you? (Serena Day for Eater)

Ample Hills was sold to Schmitt Industries for one million dollars. They were the only company to submit a qualifying bid. Technically the sale is pending with a court hearing set for June 30. (Erika Adams for Eater)

85 restaurants where you can eat outside today. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 24, 2020 – The “Someone Told Me It Was the Weekend” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 21.2% of the city may have already been exposed to COVID-19, a cocktail delivery guide, you cannot have friends over for dinner, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 50˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 44˚ High: 61˚

Quick note: Yesterday I said that “At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state” talking about COVID-19 tests. I mistakenly did the math for 40,000 a month, not 40,000 a day. At 40,000 a day it’ll take 486 days to test everyone in the state once. Thanks to reader Stacy for catching the error

Alright, some cats are getting COVID-19, here’s an interview with experts on what to worry about and what to relax about. (Shame Weaver for Time Out)

A new survey suggests that 21.2% of New York City residents have COVID-19 antibodies, meaning a whole lot of us have already had the virus and never knew it. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new study from the medical journal JAMA showed 88 percent of COVID-19 patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation in the Northwell Health system lost their lives. The study looked at 5,700 intubated patients. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The cocktail delivery guide, because I heard somewhere that it’s the weekend. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio has never let advice from professionals stop him from making a decision that he wants to make. The entire city told him not to run for president and he did anyway. He doesn’t want to open the city’s streets up for pedestrians and cyclists and he won’t unless he’s forced. He’s canceled two months’ worth of summer events but has decided that the Fourth of July fireworks must go on because it would “hurt the morale of New Yorkers as they’re fighting this fight.” Buddy, 11,000 of your citizens have died. Fireworks aren’t gonna save the city. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Shame is a powerful weapon. Ruth’s Chris is going to return their $20 million from the federal government. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Sweetgreen, not wanting to be left out, will return the $10 million the government loaned to it. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Briefly favorite Jen Carlson has a question. Is it snowing outside? Seriously, when was the last time you were outside? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Can you have friends over for dinner? For god’s sake, NO! (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

People who have dogs live longer. Are people in dog-friendly buildings happier than their dogless counterparts? Yes they are! (Susan Lehman for NY Times)

Pairing takeout with a movie, because there’s only so many times you can heat up something frozen and watch Friends. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Feeling like going out? Well, you can’t, but you can try out NYC’s best attempts at recreating nightlife virtually with this list of the best clubs to party at online. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

A look at “Tiger King” with Harlem’s Tiger Man, Antoine Yates, who kept 425-pound Ming the Tiger in his apartment. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

The City Council is moving on helping small businesses with legislation that would put it place a pause on evictions for commercial and residential tenants that would remain in place through April 2021. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If you find a wedding ring on the corner of 87th and West End, please return it to the woman who lost it during the 7pm clap out her window. The ring is a plain platinum band and the couple who lost it has been together for over 50 years. (Mike Michkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

As food suppliers and farmers are looking at having to destroy or dispose of the food they create, State Senator Joseph Addabbo is looking to pair those farmers with those in need to prevent waste and hunger at the same time. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Apartment Porn: A $9.3 million Tribeca penthouse with an irrigated roof garden and outdoor kitchen, two living rooms, a walk-in pantry, and three bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms, on top of everything else. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

Here’s how the city ould address its sidewalks after it has become abundantly clear that they have failed us as a place to practice proper social distancing. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Looking to get into a Trader Joe’s? Now there are Twitter accounts telling you how long the lines are. Right now, they’re run by people who live nearby and want to be helpful while quarantining. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

An ode to an unlikely restaurant pick, especially in NYC, Blimpie. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

This year’s AIDS Walk will now be a virtual happening, with its date moving from May 17 to June 7. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The state’s Department of Health and Attorney General Letitia James are investigating New York nursing homes to determine if management complied with COVID-19 regulations, with violated facing fines and the potential loss of their licenses. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s 140,000 coronavirus cases are only the tip of the iceberg. According to Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot, “we have probably close to a million New Yorkers who have been exposed to COVID-19.” (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The percent of NYPD officers calling out sick has dropped for two weeks straight. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

Spruce up your Zoom backgrounds with some of these images from Parks@Home, historical photos from the Records Department, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, or the NYPL. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Know someone who needs a sugar rush? Economy Candy is now selling CandyCare Packs. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

When you call a restaurant using the number listed on GrubHub/Seamless, the restaurant is charged a fee from the company, which some are complaining to be as high as $7.17. If you’ve got a question or a problem with your order, look up the restaurant’s phone number using a different method and stop making orders through GrubHub/Seamless. Call the restaurant directly and make your order. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

I am 100% on board for Governor Cuomo’s shit-talking on Mitch McConnell. (NY1)

SNL has another quarantine episode this weekend. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Ample Hills is putting itself on the auction block to companies like Cinnabon and Auntie Anne’s owner Focus Brands and Unilever. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at Rockefeller Center under construction in 1932. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

8 books for when you miss New York City, even though you’re quarantined here. (Isabel Crabtree for New York Cliche)

A free adult coloring book, full of color from city life, is available for download from Subway Creates and artist David Regone. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Take a tour of the first NYC public health lab to test for COVID-19. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Your questions, answered by The City. (Lauren Costantino and Allison Dikanovic for The City)

40 pizza parlors still open for the best possible Friday night meal. (Diana Hubbell for Eater)

Thanks to reader Annie for today’s featured photo.