The Briefly for December 6, 2019 – The “Your New Year’s Wishes Will Become Literal Trash” Weekend Edition

In today’s daily NYC digest: The weekend’s subway disruptions, coffee rat, Gambino family mobsters were caught for racketeering, the best unsing restaurants, and more

This weekend’s subways are a mess of fun, including a few suspensions. Better check before you go if you’re along the 4, 5, A, E, J, N, Q, and R trains. (Lance for Subway Weekender)

The owners of Luna Park in Coney Island are raising the rent on the independently owned businesses on the Riegelmann Boardwalk by 500% on January 1. On top of the rent, they also take 10% of the sales as well. It’s a greedy move by the largest lease-holder in Coney Island, who tried to evict all the businesses on the boardwalk in 2010. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The LinkNYC kiosks were supposed to by “a critical step toward a more equal, open, and connected city,” according to the mayor. Instead, they’re digital billboards, an additional form of surveillance, magnets for controversy, and of the 7,500 that were to be installed, only 1,774 are in operation. With less than 25% of the promised numbers actually delivered, they have done little to address the digital divide in the city. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

Spend a Sunday with Cheslie Kryst, Miss USA. (Tammy La Gorce for NY Times)

Your wishes for 2020 can become literal trash less than an hour into the new year. If you want to see your hopes and dreams end up in the sewer, you can submit a new year wish to be included on Times Square confetti in-person or online. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Is the MTA’s “Rockaway Parkway Station” an abbreviation or an amazing typo? (@clauirizarry)

Holiday windows in NYC you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Do you need to be reminded that fishing in the Gowanus Canal, a waterway whose water was nicknamed “Black Mayo,” is a bad idea? The answer is a surprising “yes,” because the city is adding more signs reminding people of the Superfund status of the canal. (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 421-a tax abatement program was meant to spur development and make home-owning less of a financial burden by temporarily lowering real estate tax bills, but that temporary financial relief is exactly that. Only temporary. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Real estate tax is tricky to begin with. On average Bronx and Staten Island homeowners have lower home values, but pay a higher percentage of the value of their homes compared to other boroughs. There are four classes of property that are all taxed differently and assessments vary. Reform is on the agenda for 2020. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

Meet Lauren Ashcraft, the 30-year-old democrat socialist challenging U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney for her seat in Congress. (Victoria Merlino for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“Jagged Little Pill” on Broadway is a Times Critic’s Pick. (Jesse Green for NY Times)

You might see headlines about how Di Fara Pizza will “deliver” its pizza for the first time. While it’s technically true, they are working with a company that ships food through the mail rather than locally. While it’s a fun gimmick to say that you can get a pizza from Di Fara “delivered” to your friend in Seattle, it’s also not the delivery you were looking for. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Who are the people clamoring for Blockbuster Video merchandise in 2019? Well, a pop-up on Soho is here for them to get their fix of a doomed business from the 90s. (Untapped New York)

The Sanitation Department have select the garbage cans of tomorrow, and they look like garbage cans. The cans of tomorrow will be seen on Fifth Ave near 90th St first before implemented more widely across the city. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A Target is coming to Times Square and it’s expected to open in 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Kellogg’s NYC near Union Square, where for some reason you could get a bowl of cereal for $1.50, is closed. Miraculously, it was open for nearly two years. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where to ice skate in the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s homeless relocation program has been under investigation since February for placing families in unsafe living conditions outside city limits. Newark is suing NYC in federal court for moving homeless families into Newark slums. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The NYPD has more tasers than ever, and it seems like they’re trigger-happy to use those tasers on people of color and the “emotionally disturbed” based on four years of complaints about improper use. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Today marks the release of the third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. What would her classic-six apartment on Riverside Drive be worth today? (Emily McDonald for StreetEasy)

The filming locations of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Dyker Heights Christmas lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An explosion at an Amtrak facility in the Bronx has left one person dead and two people with minor injuries, according to the FDNY. (Elizabeth Kim and Andy Mai for Gothamist)

Congrats to everyone who posted photos of a viral milkshake to Instagram, you’ve participated in the dumbest food trend of the decade. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Okay, so now Coffee Rat is now a thing. Great. (Ben Kayas for Gothamist)

Are there still Gambino mobsters out there? Yes, because 12 of them, including their boss Andrew Campos, were arrested on racketeering and loan sharking charges on Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Are you one of the 50,000 whose late fees to the New York Public Library were referred to a collections agency? (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Take a deep breath. There have been no reported Mandarin Duck sightings in a while and some pessimists have feared the worst. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Under their new contract, bus and subway workers would get a roughly 10% raise over the next four years. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Great New Year’s Eve restaurants that don’t require a tasting menu. (The Infatuation)

The ten best unsung restaurants from the Times’ Hungry City columnist. (Ligaya Michan for NY Times)

The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

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The Briefly for March 29, 2019 – The “The Final Year of Plastic Bags in New York” Edition

Mayor de Blasio is afraid to say “bike lane,” a protest in support of Kalman Yeger’s Palestine comments, the best pancakes, where to eat in the LES, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It’s the tail end of the month and no one can escape the weekend subway closures and diversions. (6sqft)

“We’re allowed our opinions… There is no such thing as Palestine… He tweeted the truth and we came here to stand up for him.” Welcome to the protest in support of Kalman Yeger’s “Palestine doesn’t exist” comment. Kalman Yeger is on the city’s immigration committee, and that is jeopardy now. (Bklyner)

Say farewell to single-use plastic bags at retail stores. (NY Times)

Barneys is going to give up more than half of its space on Madison Ave to cut back on its $30 million annual rent. This follows Lord & Taylor jettisoning their Fifth Ave store and the complete closure of Henri Bendel. (The Real Deal)

The state’s budget is due by midnight on Sunday, can the Governor and the legislature get their priorities in order to pass it? (Gotham Gazette)

Inside Whole Foods’ new convenience store in Chelsea. (Gothamist)

Want to live a long life? Move to Queens. Queens is in the top 20 counties in the country for life expectancy. (QNS)

Brooklyn’s most endangered buildings. (Curbed)

The Upper West Side’s best pancakes. KofiMania is running wild. (I Love The Upper West Side)

Kudos to the Coney Island Polar Bear Club for raising $60,000 during their New Year’s Day swim. The money will do towards half a dozen charities in and around Coney Island. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Some people argue at work and some Amtrak employees shoot their co-worker in the leg. (Gothamist)

Can the Knicks be freed from the tyranny of James Dolan? Can we ever be free from the awfulness of his band? (Gothamist)

New York is expanding its lawsuit the Sackler family, the billionaires behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson added his voice to those calling for the abolition of the Specialized High Schools Admission Test, in addition to expanding the number of city-designated elite high schools. (Chalkbeat)

The mayor’s claim of “fewer vehicles” is hard to believe when he makes a promise to reduce the city’s fleet by 1,000 when he added over 5,000 since being elected. (NY Post)

The proposed rezoning of Gowanus will add 8,200 new apartments to the neighborhood by 2035, including 3,000 that will be below market rate. The city published a draft scope of work, a step towards a land use review. (Curbed)

How the city influenced its baseball teams. (Streeteasy)

A ride on an NYC Ferry will cost you $2.75, but it could be costing the city an additional $24.75. (amNY)

Grub Street just couldn’t help themselves. They went around and tried to order the “St. Louis Style” bagel at a number of bagel places. (Grub Street)

Why is Mayor de Blasio afraid of saying “bike lanes” when it comes to Queens Blvd? (Streetsblog)

Something else the mayor can’t seem to do is pick a new head of NYCHA by the April 6 deadline. (NY Post)

Tracy Morgan has not forgotten his Brooklyn roots and paid for a makeover to the Bed-Stuy Marcy Houses where he grew up and partnered with GrowNYC, Feeding America, and City Harvest to improve the Harrie Carthan Community Garden. (amNY)

Parents can now remove a doctor’s name from a birth certificate if their license was suspended for misconduct or abuse. (NY Post)

If you love being creeped out, you can now book an overnight stay at Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Time Out)

Where to eat on the Lower East Side. (The Infatuation)

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