The Briefly for October 3, 2018 – Illness, Microbes, and Epidemics Shaped Our City

It’s legal to take your dog on public transit in an emergency, the Lower East Side Mall expands, the Central Park Squirrel Census, neighborhoods for bookworms, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Presidential Alert System will be tested at 2:18pm today. If you have a phone that can receive text messages, you’ll be receiving a message. Three New Yorkers are fighting today’s test in court. (NY Post)

How illness, microbes, and epidemics designed New York City. (Curbed)

A NIMBY lawsuit is aimed at trying to stop the addition of bus priority lanes, bike lanes, sidewalk expansions, and anything else that might be helpful during the L train shutdown. (Gothamist)

The check is no longer in the mail. Vanessa Bandie, Lauren Johnson, Paul Daniels, and James Black were charged in connection with stealing more than $29,000 from checks in the mail (BKLYNER).

Governor Cuomo signed legislation that allows pets to be brought on any public transit during an emergency. (NY Post)

If you left your gun in the Lambs Club bathroom last week, the NYPD has your gun. (Eater)

A 9-year-old girl was sitting on her window-mounted air conditioner when it fell out of the sixth floor and she followed down to the second story roof of a day care next to her building. She survived and suffered a broken ankle. (Daily News)

Rent increases have gone into effect for rent-stabilized apartments, after the Rent Guidelines Board voted to allow rent hikes. One-year leases will increase 1.5% and two-year leases will increase 2.5%. (Curbed)

The city’s 20 premiere pastry shops. (Eater)

After a third daylight shooting in three months near the Fulton Mall, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams has called for a meeting to prevent future violence. (BKLYNER)

The Central Park Squirrel Census needs volunteers! (amNY)

An accident in Brooklyn turned into a wild gunpoint kidnapping and extortion that ended on an eighth-floor fire escape on the Upper West Side. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio created a new position in his administration, a chief democracy officer, whose job it will be to get people registered to vote and civil participation. Critics warn that the $165k/year job is a waste of money, similar to the “night mayor,” who is paid $130k/year. (NY Post)

If you have thoughts on the proposed 40-story jail that Mayor de Blasio wants to put on Atlantic Avenue in Boerum Hill, . You can email boroughplan@doc.nyc.gov (Brooklyn Paper)

The Lower East Side Mall is nearly complete. Marshalls is opening next door to Katz’s on Thursday. (Bowery Boogie)

The Trump administration is withholding on over a billion dollars in funding for transit projects and have been fighting against granting any funding for projects. The MTA’s “Fast Forward” plan will cost between $14 and $43 billion and relies heavily on federal funding. (Transit for America)

The best neighborhoods in the city for bookworms in celebration of National Book Month. (StreetEasy)


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The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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The Briefly for September 19, 2018 – Flood Rat is the New Pizza Rat

Flood rat, over 100 city school bus drivers had no background checks, protests over ritualistic killing of chickens in the streets, and more

Forget Pizza Rat, Flood Rat is our new mayor.

The ritualistic slaughter of chickens in Crown Heights by the Orthodox Jewish community was met with protest from people believe that swinging a live chicken over your head and then beheading it is cruel. Roughly 50,000 chickens are killed in ad-hoc slaughter houses throughout Crown Heights, Williamsburg, and Borough Park and in the past those animals have ended up in the garbage.

The city’s ubiquitous temporary construction fences are going to get a makeover. The Department of Cultural Affairs launched a pilot program calling for artwork to live on temporary fencing. You can apply through October 12.

$4.1 million is being set aside by the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs to provide legal assistance for unaccompanied and separated migrant children who are still in New York.

The new Museum of Street Art pays tribute to 5 Pointz, and it’s in the stairwells at the citizenM hotel. The curator is the former 5 Pointz spokeswoman Marie Flageul.

We’re all aware the subway doesn’t know how to handle heavy rain, but these videos compiled by the NY Post shows just how screwed the subways were during the remnants of Hurricane Florence.

19 stand-out restaurants and bars in Red Hook, from Eater.

Are Bill de Blasio and Andrew Cuomo ready to hug it out? The mayor spoke at a Democrat rally on Tuesday and while he didn’t verbally endorse Cuomo for Governor, his spokesman says his speech was an endorsement.

The city gave out 21 million condoms in the year ending June 30, down from 35 million the previous year. The de Blasio administration is blaming the difference on a decrease of federal funding towards traditional safe sex products.

The impact of Schneps Communications purchasing CNG (the local news publication consolidation reported on last week) is less reporters covering certain neighborhoods in the city.

Four men who were repeatedly sexually abused as children by a religion teacher at a Catholic church in Brooklyn received a $27.5 million settlement from the Diocese of Brooklyn in one of the largest settlements ever awarded to individual victims of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church.

The DOE is investigated allegations that more than 100 people were approved to work as city school-bus drivers without any background checks.

Do you know about the ramp in Forest Hills? Atlas Obscura tells the story about the meeting place of The Ramones before they were The Ramones, which now bears a mural of the iconic band by Ori Carino.

Meet the v good dogs that protect Amtrak at Penn Station.


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