The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 30, 2019 – The “I Don’t Have to Talk to You” Edition

Transgender activists will get a monument, a prison may become luxury apartments, this week’s commute from hell, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is getting safer, but pockets of Brooklyn are seeing spikes in violence. Is gang activity to blame? (NY Times)

“I don’t have to talk to you.” Why did Brooklyn Community Board 1 buy that $26,000 SUV? It doesn’t matter, because now the story is about Community Board 1’s district manager Gerald Esposito’s outburst when questioned about it at a board meeting this week. (The City)

One of the benefits of going to school at NYU is that you also get to live in one of the country’s most expensive rental markets. Oh what, that’s not a benefit. (Patch)

The Staten Island Wheel is the city’s zombie project. Now that it’s been dead for months, the city’s Economic Development Corporation is meeting with a new developer to work on the 630 foot tall Ferris wheel. (6sqft)

Electric scooters are still illegal, but rent-by-the-minute mopeds have arrived in Long Island City, Astoria, and multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods. (LIC Post)

We have the mayor mayor, the night mayor, and soon we may have the bike mayor. (Streetsblog)

If you’re a fan of events like The Squirrel Census, the Great Fish Count is looking for volunteers across the city. (6sqft)

Is this pole dancing rat the work of the enigmatic Zardulu? (Gothamist)

More on Zardulu. (Reply All)

In a move that seems too perfect for the nightmare dystopia the city’s real estate has become, a former prison in Harlem may soon become a series of luxury apartments. (The Root)

A guide to the city’s only observation decks. An easy guide because it comprises of all of them. (Curbed)

The “mechanical void” loophole has officially been closed by the city council. The short version of it was that developers were adding mechanical space in the middle of buildings to get around zoning laws to make the upper floors of their buildings as high as possible. (Curbed)

Three men were found guilty of “a sort of insurance fraud on steroids” that made them $31 million richer until they were caught. (Gothamist)

This week’s commuting hell belongs to 79th St, where the MTA closed all but one exit, causing overcrowding and five trainloads of people unable to leave the station. (Gothamist)

A few weeks after City Hall transferred city-owned land in the Bronx to a developer and approved $12 million in financing for an affordable apartment complex, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s political action committee received a $25,000 donation. (The City)

Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, pioneering transgender activists who were at the vanguard of the gay rights movement, will be immortalized in a monument that may be placed down the street from the Stonewall Inn. (NY Times)

Netflix’s mini-series on the Central Park Five is released on Friday, and with it will bring a flood of stories about the men at the center of the controversy and how they were targeted, hated, and abused by the city they called home and more specifically Donald Trump. (NY Times)

First, it was Trader Joe’s and now Whole Foods is following suit. 8 of the city’s 12 Whole Foods will stop making deliveries outside of what they refer to as the “walking zone” near their stores and are pushing customers to otherwise use Amazon’s ‘Prime Now’ app instead of visiting the store at all. (Tribeca Citizen)

Where to eat, but mostly where to avoid, at Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Governor Cuomo does not have any plans to lighten his grip on the state and just started his third term. He announced plans to run for a fourth term in office. The last governor of New York to serve four complete terms was George Clinton, New York’s very first governor in 1777. (Patch)

Katz’s is having a ‘When Harry Met Sally’ fake orgasm contest on the 30th anniversary of the film’s release. If you’ve been training for this your whole life, this is your moment. (Eater)

40 ideas for a birthday party for an adult. Calling it an “adult birthday party” sounds like it involves pornography. (Grub Street)

Can we have one week without someone intentionally trying to sabotage the subways? (Gothamist)

Tourism is up in the city and has taken Broadway’s box offices with it. 2018 was the ninth straight year of growth in the number of tourists, who make up 63% of the total 14,768,254 people attending Broadway shows, paying $1.8 billion for tickets. Other factors in Broadway’s growth include longer running shows, a wider variety of shows and a higher volume of them as well. And Hamilton, which grossed $165 million in ticket sales. (NY Times)

Infinity in a Tiny Room is an art show that takes place in an apartment, and no, this is not in Bushwick. (Patch)

The best Thai restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

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