The Briefly for May 28, 2020 – The “Can You Spare $9 Billion?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Farewell to Train Daddy for real, Mayor de Blasio continues to be content to not lead, one of the happiest places in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 64˚ High: 69˚
Overcast throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met.

Andy Byford, you’re gone for real. Train Daddy is headed to London to become their new Transport Commissioner. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

When New York City beings phase one of reopening, does the MTA have a plan to allow that to happen? We’ve heard multiple ideas floated in the last few months for the subways, but the MTA hasn’t yet put forward their plan on how to deal with construction and manufacturing workers returning to their jobs. Stephen Nessen and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Curbed puts it best: Did New York City just give up on public transit? (Alissa Walker for Curbed)

Got $9 billion to spare? New York could use it. The city’s budget is due by the end of June and with a $9 billion hole to crawl out of, things are likely to get worse before they get better. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Say hello to Bobby Catone, the city’s biggest jackass. He plans on opening his Staten Island tanning salon to the public today in defiance of the governor’s orders. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

It seems that when people fled New York City, they also left behind their census forms. Also: An interactive map to see how you’re district is responding to the 2020 census. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The coronavirus layoffs are hitting Black households in New York harder than white households. 44% of Black households have seen a layoff compared to 27% of white households, but 84% of Black voters feared reopening too quickly compared to 59% white. There’s a reason for that fear, more than double the number of Black New Yorkers have died during the pandemic than white New Yorkers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: Construction on “Little Island,” the two-acre park being built on Pier 55 is progressing ahead of its scheduled spring 2021 opening. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A bodybag protest was laid at the doorstep of city hall to show the plight of homeless New Yorkers, who crowd into the city’s shelters every night. Protesters demanded the city open up hotel rooms as an alternative to crowded shelters. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Okay, we’re all sick of cooking every meal for ourselves, right? Here comes WoodSpoon to allow you to order home-cooked meals prepared by out-of-work chefs. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The New York Public Library is considering curbside service at libraries. Reserve your book in advance and swing by a kiosk to pick it up. If it can happen at Best Buy without the pandemic, it can happen at the NYPL during it. (Reuven Blau for The City)

A look inside a plasma donation center, which the Times is calling “one of the happiest places in New York.” (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Beyond Sushi is opening a ghost kitchen in Long Island City. (Jacob Kaye for QNS)

The city has offered very little in terms of help for restaurant and bar owners and has offered absolutely nothing in terms of a plan for reopening. Not only have they offered nothing in terms of help, but Mayor de Blasio is also stepping up enforcement of bars and restaurants in nine neighborhoods. Where the hell has the “Nightlife Mayor” been on this? Isn’t this a job specifically designed for them to be helping with? (Erika Adams for Eater)

The mayor’s response to this entire crisis has been to sit back and let other cities lead. Instead of leading the city’s help and support restaurants and bars and small businesses, he sits on his hands and watches. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

RIP Larry Kramer, whose activism helped shifted the nation’s policies towards AIDS. (Daniel Lewis for NY Times)

Have you become the master of your kitchen under quarantine? Are you ready for a challenge? Step up to the word’s stinkiest fruit, durian, and make some desserts with this dessert box available for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Attorney General Letitia James filed an amicus brief on Tuesday as part of a coalition of 14 attorneys general who are hoping to keep the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement out of courthouses unless they have a judicial warrant or court order. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

With budget cuts looming large, CUNY plans to continue online courses through the fall semester, with only a small fraction of courses and services offered in-person. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

There is no specific place in the city to collectively grieve, but the Naming the Lost project has set up a memorial outside of Green-Wood Cemetery for people to post tributes to those who lost their lives to Covid-19. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

A few neighborhood restaurants and bakeries selling housemade sourdough starter by the ounce, cup, and jar. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“If we are going to make progress, we’ve got to address these things, and if this painful process is going to help us address this — there’s the yellow warbler!” –Christian Cooper on the Central Park incident, racism, his thoughts on Amy Cooper, and birdwatching in Central Park. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

After the Central Park Karen story, State Assemblymember Felix Ortix and State Senator Brian Benjamin have introduced a new bill that would criminalize falsely reporting an incident to police and make the offense eligible for hate crime status. (Zack Linly for The Root)

Yesterday I made mention that Governor Cuomo was headed to DC to talk President Trump into helping the state’s infrastructure projects. He came back and declared good government “extinct” in America. I’m not a political scientist, but I’m not sure that’s a good sign. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Interactive Map: New York City’s wisteria is in bloom, here’s where to see it. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Ruben Diaz, Sr. is an opponent of same-sex marriage and women’s reproductive rights and is also a Democrat. What does it mean to be a Democrat in New York City? (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

How to get hired as a contact tracer in NYC and what the job entails. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The state’s legislature has effectively killed the rent cancellation bill, taking up a “totally inadequate” bill instead. In its place is a bill that gives landlords vouchers if a landlord’s tenants must earn 80% below an area’s income anad have been paying more than 30% of their household income on rent before March 30. The total budget would give 50,000 tenants two monthly vouchers of $1,000. For perspective, one-quarter of the city’s 5.4 million renters did not pay rent last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The numbers have slowed, but not enough for reopening. A look into who are the New Yorkers who are getting sick? (Andy Newman for NY Times)

Okay, what is going on with “The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York,” being surreptitiously placed on the bookshelf in nearly every cable news interview? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

A somewhat complete (for now) guide to beach food at Rockaway Beach. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The latest openings, reopenings, takeout specials, and other exciting or noteworthy updates in the weekly restaurant update from The Infatuation. (Hannah Albertine for the Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 3, 2020 – The “Dropping the Ball, Not the Groundhog” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: How NYC became “Gotham,” Governor Cuomo’s ego pushed Andy Byford out, the mayor ignoes his BQE panel, the best restaurants in Sunset Park and more.

Today – Low: 41˚ High: 51˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

16 places to celebrate Black History Month in NYC. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Interested in changing your political party affiliation before the June primaries? Act quickly, the deadline is February 14th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Staten Island’s Chuck the Groundhog didn’t see his shadow on Sunday morning, which means that an early spring should be on its way. At least no one dropped him. (Adams Nichols for Patch)

Let’s never forget when Mayor de Blasio murdered Staten Island Chuck by dropping him on Groundhog’s Day. Chuck died a week after the drop. (Abby Ohlheiser for The Washington Post)

The City Council has taken the reigns on leading the city, due to the oiler vacuum left behind by Mayor de Blasio’s complete lack of projected strength as the leader of the city. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

11 days before volunteers participated in an annual count of the homeless sleeping on the city’s streets, the mayor’s office attempted to misrepresent the actual number by attempting to find more beds for the homeless. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio is walking away from his own “expert” panel’s central recommendation for fixing the BQE because he believes the disproven fallacy that eliminating lanes of traffic adds to congestion, instead of actually reducing it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Here’s how “induced demand” works, a concept known since the 60’s: “on urban commuter expressways, peak-hour traffic congestion rises to meet maximum capacity.” (Benjamin Schneider for CityLab)

The city is going to start enforcing the law when it comes to overweight trucks on the BQE, per the panels suggestion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

One thing’s for sure, we have less than five years if the city doesn’t do something about the BQE. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The governor has been attempting to avoid political controversy sticking to him by assigning the most difficult problems to commissions and panels. Think back his sudden swooping in to present the L train shutdown. He assigned the problem to a panel who gave the alternative. Here are his current panels: Medicaid Redesign, Traffic Mobility, Climate Action, Digital Marketplace Worker Classification, and Public Campaign Finance. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

The story of how Governor Cuomo’s oversized ego made it impossible for Andy Byford to stay on a President of New York City Transit Authority. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

If you enjoy yelling at the MTA, they’ve added more pubic feedback meetings about their redesigned bus network in Queens. (Bill Parry for QNS)

After a horrifying case of animal abuse was uncovered at a Manhattan pet store, a bill in the state legislature would ban the sale of dogs, cats, and rabbits in pet stores across the state is gaining support. The bill would ban the sale from stores, but not from breeders. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

The city’s first suspected case of coronavirus is being investigated at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue. This is no reason to panic. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A second and third case of coronavirus are already being investigated. Still no reason to panic. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

While coronavirus is on your mind, you should be worrying about the flu. his year we face a double-trouble scenario where it’s possible to get sick more than once during flu season. Two strains are hitting, so your chances of getting sick have doubled. The death toll from the flu this season is already at 10,000. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to eat sushi omakase for under $125. (Lorelei Yang for Eater)

“When you build high, folks will jump” were seven words included in an ArchDaily review of Vessel. Unfortunately on Saturday night, those words were proved true when a 19-year-old man committed suicide by jumping from the structure. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The city’s had a goal of planting 20,000 new trees every year, but has only managed to plant less than 1/3 of that lately. The Department of Parks and Recreation points to the rising costs of planting and maintaining trees. (Len Maniace for amNewYork Metro)

Hiram Monserrate was expelled from the state’s senate in 2009 for committing domestic assault in a horrifying story. In 2012 he plead guilty for illegally using money from a nonprofit he controlled to support a run for senate and has only paid back $8,400 of $79,000 in restitution for stealing public funds. He’s trying to make a political comeback. (Vivian Wang for NY Times)

Would you live in Bay Ridge? Localize lays out a case with eight reasons to move to Bay Ridge. (Localize Labs)

The story of Taste of Persia leaving Pizza Paradise just took a turn. Saeed Pourkay, chef and owner of Taste of Persia is accusing that Pizza Paradise stole his recipes shortly after his restaurant was forced out of Pizza Paradise. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A major overhaul to the city’s property taxes could fundamentally shift the tax burden from low- and moderate-income homeowners to wealthy neighborhoods. A panel has been at work on the proposal since 2018, but mayors have attempted to tackle the subject for over a quarter century. The plan wouldn’t result in higher tax revenues. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons, Matthew Haag and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

The mayor is optimistic about getting the reforms done. “This is something I believe can and will be done during my administration.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams says if elected to be mayor, he would regularly carry a gun. (NY1)

What’s the history behind New York’s nickname “Gotham?” (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A truck driver killed a Bushwick cyclist while making an illegal U-turn in Williamsburg on Jan. 30, marking the first cyclist death of 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s a video showing how Pedro Lopez was killed, and it is shocking. Despite killing Lopez, the driver of the truck was not issued a ticket and the NYPD’s comment about it was there was “no criminality suspected.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Department of Environmental Protection has reversed course and will fill the Jerome Park Reservoir basin in the Bronx. Previously the plan was to keep the basin empty. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Friday night’s “FTP” protests called for free public transit, an end to the harassment of the homeless, vendors and musicians in the subways, and full accessibility for people of all physical abilities throughout the transit system. The protest gathered at Grand Central Terminal at 5pm to maximally disrupt the evening commute and spread out from there. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

The Meatball Shop’s Lower East Side flagship location will be closing this weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

The best restaurants in Sunset Park. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 27, 2020 – The “Don’t Lean on the Subway Doors Today” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Brooklyn Flea revives the Chelsea Flea Market, Rafael Espinal quits City Council, $1,000 basement sleep pods, a library reording studio, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 45˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The real estate lobby is already calling for changes and exceptions to the city’s law reducing emissions 40% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. The law passed in May of 2019. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

New legislation could extend voting rights to Green Card holders and noncitizens with work authorization in municipal elections. There are 660,000 New Yorkers that hold Green Cards. 27 council members support the bill, but Corey Johnson hasn’t expressed support yet. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The R179 subway trains that were removed from service last month are back and safe, according to the MTA. The blame fell on the doors not being properly calibrated, but maybe don’t lean on the subway doors anymore. (Alejandra O-Connel-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Under the elevated tracks in Queens remains a dangerous place to be, as a bolt fell from the N/W tracks in Astoria, shattering a car’s sunroof. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

It hasn’t fully set in, but the reality of Train Daddy’s resignation is starting to wash over the city. Corey Johnson called his resignation a “crisis.” (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A list of Byford’s biggest achievements during his two years. (Jake Offenhartz and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Byford isn’t the only person leaving the MTA. Pete Tomlin is also resigning. Tomlin isn’t nearly as well known, but he’s an expert in signals and was the signals chief. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Fairway in Red Hook has been there since 2006, but its future is in doubt. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

An ode to the metal rat, this year’s lunar mascot. (Madeline Leung Coleman for Jezebel)

Three people in New York state have tested positive for Corona virus, and according to the mayor it’ll come to the city “sooner or later.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the Coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A Hershey Bar has a new meaning, as Hershey’s has opened a bar in the Barclays Center that serves alcoholic drinks made with Hershey’s, Reese’s, and Jolly Rancher products. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Did you know there is a recording studio in the central branch fo the Brooklyn Pubic Library? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Continuing from the Stonewall Democratic Club’s endorsement of Elizabeth Warren, Lambda Independent Democrats of Brooklyn endorsed Warren and Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club endorsed Bernie Sanders. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Chelsea Flea Market is making a return under new management. The Brooklyn Flea has a new lease for the parking lot location and will be inviting original vendors back for the same prices. As the Brooklyn Flea does, they have announced that they will also be inviting food vendors, but it will not be the focus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There’s a movement brewing to revoke the permits for the Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg event during July or August to give locals in Williamsburg unfettered use of East River State Park. There are no plans for that in 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Queens has a new speakeasy, the new Astoria’s Secret is hidden behind the facade of The Lingere Shoppe. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The real question about Byford’s departure. Will your commute get worse? Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

After using the term “yellow folks” to refer to Asians in an email, Manhattan Community Education Council 3 is calling for Brooklyn Community Education Council member Dr. Jackie Cody to resign. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Flushing’s (wet) Lunar New Year parade. (Jenna Gyimesi for NY City Lens)

A fire in Chinatown likely destroyed 85,000 items, some dating to the 19th century, from Museum of Chinese in America. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The Museum of Chinese in America is fundraising as they attempt to save what they can and rebuild. (Bowery Boogie)

An attempt at a definitive guide to New York’s Chinatowns. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

You think you pay to much in rent? Check out these $1,000 a month “sleeping pods” in a basement that are being proposed in San Francisco. (Katie Canales for Business Insider)

The NYPD is finally changing how it endorses the mayor’s electric bike ban. The focus will be on “unsafe” riding instead of ticketing and confiscating the bikes of food delivery workers, as their previous focused seemed to be. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

One thing missing from the coverage of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s moronic “go back to Ohio” comments was that the day prior to making them he was a guest at a banquet for the Real Estate Board of New York. It’s easier to make a villain of transplants instead of looking at the root problem of real estate developers who donate to your campaign for mayor and create the buildings that all these Ohioans and Iowans are moving living in. (Queens Crap)

20 standout Korean BBQ restaurants to try. (James Park for Eater)

Brooklyn Councilman Rafael Espinal quit City Council for a job with the Freelancer’s Union and the people working in his office found out about his new job via a tweet. There will be a special election for his seat in May, which represents Cypress Hills, Bushwick, Brownsville, Ocean Hill and East New York. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Spotted Pig’s staff was told to seek other work, and customers have been told that last weekend would be the restaurant’s last. It seems like the restaurant couldn’t wipe clean the stain of Ken Freidman or the things he allowed to happen inside its walls. (Eater)

You’re a reader of The Briefly, so this doesn’t apply to you, but for everyone else, where to take someone to eat who is cooler than you. (Bryan Kim and Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)