The Briefly for May 6, 2020 – The “Getting Punched in the Head Feels Excessive” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Everything you need to know about NYC’s subway overnight shut down, The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, New York wants to “Reimagine Education,” & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 55˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

Last night was the start of the four-hour subway shut down for cleaning. The MTA will be testing UV lights and anti-microbial products after each car is disinfected. While the trains are shut down buses will be operating for free. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The overnight shut down of the subways, explained. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The Times chronicled the historic night one of the MTA’s first-ever planned subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Is the end of 24-hour subway service? No, according to the governor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Another day, another video of NYPD officer punching a black New Yorker in the head during a social distancing arrest. “A punch should not be assumed to be excessive force.” -Dermot Shea, NYPD Commissioner. The person being arrested appeared to be handcuffed, on the ground, and had three officers on top of them when punched. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 10 best bike shops in New York City. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We’ve got an Aerogarden in the kitchen with some cherry tomatoes, how’s your quarantine garden going? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Like many of us, Andy Warhol bounced around the city, and so did where he did his work, The Factory. A look at where Andy Warhol lived and worked in NYC. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

Looking to work on your art in quarantine? The Metropolitan Museum of Art is offering a free botanical drawing class online. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn is “ill equipped” to identify cases of COVID-19 and stop the disease from spreading among its nearly 1,700 detainees, according to a doctor who visited the federal jail last month. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Mariah Kennedy-Cuomo, the governor’s daughter, made the suggestion that not everyone wants to listen to Governor Cuomo tell them what to do, so the state is launching a competition for New Yorkers to submit videos explaining why its important to wear masks in public. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s National Nurses Week from May 6-12 commemorating Florence Nightingale’s work in Crimea in 1854, and it couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time to honor the nurses in the city and across the country. (Isabelle Bousquette for QNS)

More information on the possible Covid-19-relate illness that has stricken over a dozen children in the city, from ages 2-15. If you have a child with a rash, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea, please contact a doctor.(Amanda Eisenberg and Erin Curkin for Politico)

Welcome2TheBronx has started a fundraising campaign to continue its coverage of the Bronx. The site has been around since 2009 and has become one of the more important voices when it comes to covering and changing the narrative about the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

There wasn’t much good news to be found in City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s analysis of the city’s 2021 fiscal budget, which starts on July 1. The budget gap is looking to total about $8.7 billion and with an unemployment rate of 22% this quarter, the city is finding itself dug into a pretty deep hole. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A last-minute NYC mother’s day gift guide. Yes, during a pandemic, Wednesday is the last minute when it comes to Mother’s Day. (The Infatuation)

Video: These sidewalk tents are a pretty good way to keep your social distance. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is turning to The Gates Foundation to help “reimagine education” for the state of New York as we continue forward with our new normal. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Over 1,200 independent music venues and promoters have banded together to form the National Independent Venue Association, or NIVA, with the goal of “securing financial support to preserve the national ecosystem of independent venues and promoters.” There is a letter template you can use to send to your state and city officials to show support for the city’s independent music venues. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A worker at Amazon’s Staten Island, New York, fulfillment center has died of Covid-19, the company confirmed. Workers at the facility, called JFK8, have been calling for greater safety precautions since early March. (Josh Dzieza for The Verge)

A look into how The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, proposed by Representative Ilhan Omar, may affect you. (Localize Labs)

All hail Hakki Akdeniz, the pizza champ, for distributing pizzas and snacks to those in need on the Bowery over the weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

It’s looking like a rainy set of days ahead, but when it gets warm here is where to get freshly made ice cream and pies in NYC. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Thanks to Jenny for today’s featured photo from the Upper West Side!

The Briefly for August 28, 2019 – The “Signs of a Wegmans Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

The growth in the car population is outpacing the growth of the actual population, the best floor in a walk-up, taking a wallaby for a walk, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All the street closings and timing of the West Indian Day Parade and all the associated events over Labor Day weekend. (Curbed)

An Andy Warhol tour and map of Manhattan from artist Patricia Fernández. (Untapped Cities)

Five takeaways from the plan to scrap the city’s gifted school programs. Will Mayor de Blasio follow the recommendation from the task force he assembled or will he try to run out the clock as he did with Eric Garner’s death? (NY Times)

It’s getting real. Signs are going up at the home of the future Brooklyn Wegmans. (Brownstoner)

Does it seem odd to anyone else that the mayor is supporting restrictions to hotel development after receiving support and campaign contributions from the hotel industry union? (6sqft)

The Mast Brothers are out of Brooklyn, doing the hipster move from Williamsburg to upstate. (Eater)

Every neighborhood has its old-school spots that have been there for decades, and many of them are endangered. Two Toms in Gowanus has been family owned since 1948, but the building the restaurant is in is for sale and the listing says it could be delivered vacant “if necessary.” (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The growth of the number of cars in the city is outpacing the growth of the city’s population. (Streetsblog)

The city is full of hidden history. Sometimes that history is a poster from 2000 for the movie Road Trip. (Gothamist)

In praise of the Manhattan dive bar: Cheap beer and good atmosphere are increasingly hard to find, but it’s out there. (amNY)

A worker was killed and five injured in a partial building collapse in Norwood in the Bronx. (Metro)

A wall in Chinatown with messages of support for the protests in Hong Kong has been vandalized twice in less than a week. Global politics are also local politics. (Gothamist)

What’s the best floor to live on in a six-floor walk-up? (Street Easy)

Jeffrey Epstein’s victims will never have their full day in court, but they have vowed to not stop fighting. (Gothamist)

The family of Eric Garner filed a judicial inquiry of Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill to answer questions about their handling of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the NYPD. (Politico)

Leslie Jones is not returning to SNL. (Gothamist)

Video: Nothing to see here here, just a man walking taking his pet wallaby for a walk. Nope, this was in Bed-Stuy, not Bushwick. (Patch)

The total population in the city’s jails has fallen 23% from 2014, but the population jailed for parole violations increased by 20% in the same period, with the average stay lasting 60 days while they wait for parole court dates. (Gothamist)

Seven acres under the new Kosciuszko Bridge in Greenpoint will be made into a park. There’s no proposed opening date and construction has not begun. The project will be lead by the North Brooklyn Parks Alliance. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Conservative Times Op-Ed columnist and climate change denier Bret Stephens quit Twitter because someone called him a “bedbug.” Poor Bret. (Gothamist)

Video: It’ll take more than It’s Pennywise the clown to rattle New Yorkers riding the L late at night. (Patch)

28 of the best sports bars in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for November 28, 2018 – The “Hold On to Your Knutstorp, Here Comes a Manhattan IKEA” Edition

The next phase of the Second Avenue Subway might finish by 2027, the 7 train’s new signal woes continue, a mysterious paralyzing disease hits NYC, 13 steakhouses, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

There isn’t much budget for restoring artwork with NYCHA’s $32 billion deficit. The friezes from sculptor Richmond Barthé are in desperate need of maintenance. (amNY)

Brooklyn’s got some new frost-resistant water fountains in Prospect Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

You can either line up at 3pm to get a spot to see tonight’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting, or you can stay home and watch it on TV, Facebook, Twitter, or NBC’s website. (Curbed)

The infamous “Five Shots of Anything for $12” Continental in the East Village has a closing date, December 15. (Page Six)

10 lesser-known Andy Warhol spots in the city. (6sqft)

If you want NYC Celebrity of the Year Mandarin Duck footage, you’re in luck. (Gothamist)

The city has a new Chinese food destination neighborhood: Forest Hills. (NY Times)

13 classic steakhouses in the city. (Eater)

See the water damage the MTA regularly fixes in subway tunnels and stations. (Viewing NYC)

Yeah, everyone hates that Trump-loving gay couple the NY Times profiled. (HuffPost)

Snug Harbor’s Winter Lantern Festival will give you a reason to visit Staten Island. (Time Out)

The second day of the brand new signals meant to make 7 train service more reliable was full of signal-related failures. (NY Post)

Legal e-scooters are one step closer to being a reality. (Curbed)

Are you sitting down in your POANG? IKEA is coming to Manhattan. (6sqft)

18 solid restaurants in Long Island City. (Eater)

A mysterious paralyzing disease, called AFM, has shown up in New York City. It’s been described as “polio-like.” If you have weakened muscles and reflexes a week after a cold, get yourself to a doctor. (Gothamist)

RIP Tom Margittai, the man who revitalized the Four Seasons. (NY Times)

Sanitation Salvage, the private garbage company responsible for over 50 accidents and two deaths, is surrendering its license and going out of business. (NY Post)

The city is considering alternatives to their “tear down the Brooklyn Promenade” approach to replacing the BQE, but isn’t making any promises. (Brooklyn Paper)

The City Council is trying to make it illegal for businesses to go completely cashless. (Politico)

What does a nightmare commute look like? How about two people getting into a fight while getting onto a subway, followed by spraying a “mace-like” substance into the crowd, sending four people to the hospital. (NY Post)

The next phase of the Second Avenue Subway is underway, but won’t be completed until 2027 at the earliest. 20 years for six subway stations. (Second Avenue Sagas)

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