The Briefly for July 15, 2019 – The “I’ve Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway” Edition

Our absent mayor was absent during the blackout, the reinvention of the rainbow cookie, de Blasio hires his son to save his 0% campaign, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The late-night disruptions this week are minimal unless you’re on the L train in Brooklyn. Service is suspended between Lorimer and Broadway Junction. (Subway Weekender)

A gallery of how broadway shows and professional musicians handled the blackout, along with New Yorkers stepping up to direct traffic, and a video of the lights turning back on. (Huff Post)

When the power went out, the first question was “why?” The second question was where the hell is our mayor? (NY Times)

Where was the mayor? He has an average 0% support and yet he was spending the day in Iowa. (Politico)

When he was asked on the air on CNN at 9 pm, two hours after the blackout began the mayor said he was still weighing his options. (Politico)

While a portion of the city sat in darkness, it was Corey Johnson that provided public leadership on the news, Twitter, and during Sunday’s press conference. Our absentee mayor continued to be absent. (Chelsea Now)

Want to live in a city where you can save money for a rainy day? Too bad, you live in New York. (CNBC)

If you’re the person that’s been praying for consistent hot temperatures, this is the week where all your friends will give you the side-eye. Welcome to the first sweltering week of summer. (amNY)

The state legislature passed the Utility Responsibility Bill and now it waits for the governor’s signature. The bill would protect homeowners if any damage was done to their property by utility companies. (QNS)

Do you know the difference between a studio and a one-bedroom apartment? Did you know a bedroom needs to be a minimum of 80 square feet with a ceiling height minimum of eight feet? (StreetEasy)

R. Kelly has been arrested and indicted of racketeering and violating federal anti-sex trafficking laws. These are in addition to the charges he’s facing in Illinois. He faces up to 70 years in prison. (Patch)

The rainbow cookie is already perfect, but some chefs can’t leave well-enough alone. (Eater)

Whoever the monster is that stole the key to the city received by Allie Long, a member of the US Women’s National Team, understand that you have made very powerful enemies. (Gothamist)

Your landlord can threaten to let your apartment fall into disrepair, but they can’t actually do that. Learn about the warranty of habitability and what it means for your apartment. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health includes “BKLYN Wild” in the Time Out Market, which broke the 100 violation point mark with a 102 score. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, who has insisted that he is not in control of the MTA, has they need you to adopt or foster an animal. (amNY)

This Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon and the city is celebrating multiple ways. (Gothamist)

Inside a mostly abandoned mall in Queens, Board of Elections worker are counting out the fate of the Queens District Attorney’s office. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit is challenging the legality of the “spot rezoning” that was necessary to allow the 80 Flatbush development project a reality. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Abel Cedeno says he had been bullied for being gay, took the stand in his own defense at his manslaughter trial for the murder of two of his high school classmates with a knife. (NY Times)

The city unveiled its plans to protect the east side of Manhattan from the Lower East Side to 25th St with the design of the East River Park. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project’s walls and design would protect the area from a 16 foot level of sea rise, which is the “100-year flood + waves” level. (Curbed)

A human leg was found in a channel in the waters of Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you think you apply for affordable housing in the city, registration is a fairly simple process. (Curbed)

The city council’s Committee on Small Business is calling on Letitia James’s office to look at the settlement agreement that allowed Grub Hub to buy Seamless in 2013 in light of the reports about Grub Hub’s business tactics. (Grub Street)

JetBlue installed Does Starbucks sell newspapers? If you answered no, you’ll soon be proven right because the company announced that they will stop selling The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and USA Today at its 8,600 locations nationwide. (NY Times)

RIP Hector Figueroa, former president of the Service Employees International Union and a key player in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio is polling at a 0% average in the Democrat presidential primary. Will hiring his son help his campaign? It literally couldn’t hurt it. (NY Times)

A preliminary report is suggesting that the impending MTA overhaul reduce the number of groups within the organization from 40 into six departments to centralize and simplify. The MTA’s board is expected to vote on a final version of the plan on the 24th. (amNY)

The President’s ICE enforcement action started on Saturday in the city, but early reports indicate that no one opened their doors for ICE and as a result, no one was detained. (amNY)

The race to replace José E. Serrano after he steps down as a result of a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis will be contended by Ruben Diaz Sr, an openly homophobic city councilperson, and Ritchie J Torres, the first openly gay person to hold office in the Bronx. (NY Times)

Need a late-night fix and you already had pizza for lunch? A list of late-night delivery spots that aren’t just pizza. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 18, 2019 – The “Please Insert A Floppy Disk to Upgrade the Subways” Edition

The Green Light bill passed, marijuana legalization, e-bikes and e-scooters are still up for grabs, the best restaurants in Chinatown and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The governor is adding 500 law enforcement officers to the subway to fight back against assaults and the MTA’s fear of fare evasion. (amNY)

This week in animals stopping the subways: a turkey stopped the N train in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

The subway is powered by OS/2, IBM’s computer operating system that dates back to the early 90s. (Tedium)

I think we need a full ban on any helicopters going over Manhattan itself.” – Mayor de Blasio. (6sqft)

Staten Island is getting 77 “state-of-the-art” buses. So far the MTA’s overhaul in Staten Island has sped up the buses by 12%. Still short of the mayor’s 25% goal, but if it works in Staten Island, it has hopes in the rest of the city. (Curbed)

The ‘Renewable Rikers Act’ was introduced in the city council to transform Rikers into a renewable energy center, sponsored by Astoria’s Councilmember Costa Constanides and Helen Rosenthal. (Give Me Astoria)

It’s the summertime, so it’s time to look for some new cocktails. A look across the city’s bars at drinks like The Donkey Kong, A Song of Ice and Fire, The Canary, and any other drinks ith great names. (amNY)

The summer mosquito spraying is beginning. (Patch)

Are these sandwiches worth hour-long waits? Through July 13th, you’ve got your chance at Otto. (Gothamist)

I think I’m sort of a laid back, cool dude in a loose mood.” Governor Andrew “cool dude, loose mood” Cuomo. (@JimmyVielkind)

RIP Gloria Vanderbilt, fashion designer, socialite, and Anderson Cooper’s mother. (CNN)

Video: The story of the rise and fall of Anna Delvy, the socialite grifter. (Cheddar)

The Green Light bill, the bill that will provide undocumented immigrants the opportunity to have drivers licenses, is now the Green Light law. (NY Times)

Battery Park is built on a landfill, but in the late 70s and early years of the 80s, Battery Park was a beach. If you’ve never seen photos of Battery Park before Battery Park, it’s a wild sight. (NY Times)

Paul Manafort was scheduled to be moved to Rikers Island, Attorney General Bill Barr’s top deputy intervened. He’s likely to be held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in lower Manhattan. (NY Times)

Ten secrets of Queens’ Fort Totten Park. (Untapped Cities)

Watch Dominique Ansel make his most popular item: the DKA. (Viewing NYC)

Brooklyn, are you ready for another special election next week? (The Brooklyn Reader)

Albany appears to be working at its hardest as the end of the legislative session is approaching. Legalizing electric bikes and scooters are on the docket. There are some peculiar exceptions in the bill, like no company can rent scooters in Manhattan and scooters would be banned from the Hudson River Greenway, but it’s a start. (Streetsblog)

The state’s legislative session is ending on Wednesday and lawmakers are described as “frantic” to pass marijuana legalization before their summer break. (NY Times)

Gem Spa on Second Ave and St Marks isn’t going anywhere. Despite “Everything Must Go!” signs, the owners have reassured the community that they are “very much open for business” and simply had to clear the sidewalk. (EV Grieve)

The ASPCA is scheduled to open three low-cost vet clinics in the city for people who can’t otherwise afford the care their companions may need. (amNY)

The city’s animal shelters were supposed to go “no kill” by 2015. So what happened? (Gothamist)

23 LGBT landmarks of the East Village and Noho. (6sqft)

There will be no subway disruptions during World Pride weekend on the 29th and 30th. (Gothamist)

“Avoid walking across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset” and other tips from the New York Times on how to survive WorldPride weekend as one of the expected four million revelers. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in Chinatown. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 24, 2019 – The “Human Rights Violations by the MTA” Edition

How to get around and what to eat and drink Memorial Day weekend, the ACC is looking for people to hang out with dogs, commuting from the suburbs sucks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about getting around in NYC during Memorial Day weekend, including all of the normal weekend disruptions that bleed through to Monday. (6sqft)

If you love dogs but can’t have one in your apartment, here’s a compromise. The city’s Animal Care Centers is looking for people who take a shelter dog out for some fun for a few hours. Go to the park to play, go for a long walk with your new best friend, go for a car ride, or a dog-friendly restaurant, it doesn’t matter. Give one of these dogs a break from shelter life. It’s all part of the “BoroughBreak” program, which starts up this weekend. (amNY)

This is the jackass pulling the emergency brakes on the subways. (amNY)

The MTA is on the verge of a state human rights violation by constantly failing to install elevators. In the words of the judge “There has to be action, no more talk.” (Gothamist)

A Brooklyn Community Board bought a $26k SUV, which just so happened to have its own parking space across the street from the board’s manager Gerald Esposito. Why did they buy it? “To go different places.” (The City)

Your guide to the food at Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

The Queens Zoo has two new fluffy babies in Brienne and Benny, a pair of Andean bears. (amNY)

What makes you a regular? Weekly visits? A drink named after you? “The usual?” (NY Times)

Cellino & Barnes, the comedy, is coming to Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

“When one attorney refused to acquiesce, respondent Barnes called him a ‘f—ing coward and vowed that respondent Barnes ‘will remember this.” Here’s a history on the infamous breakup of two NYC famous lawyers. (The Cut)

The Port Authority is drowning in people and buses and something has to change. (Curbed)

If you’re flying out of Newark this weekend, sorry to hear it, but here’s a list of where to eat in EWK. (Eater)

It’s Memorial Day weekend. Let’s start worrying about hurricanes. (Patch)

The 7 train has been literally falling apart, but the MTA doesn’t think that danger is enough to put netting under the platforms to protect the cars below. (The City)

The city’s libraries need about $35 million in additional funding, but they received an $11 million cut from Mayor de Blasio. This is poor timing because the libraries are expected to play a big part in the 2020 census, which the mayor claims to be a priority. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Welcome to the Mr. Jones Supper Club, the city’s most exclusive dining experience. (Great Big Story)

Over a quarter million people move out of the city every year and move to the suburbs, where they find that their commutes still suck. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson has put a bill forward that is a ten-year roadmap to breaking the city’s car culture. (Curbed)

Penn Station, the city’s festering exit wound,” sucks, but here are a few tips to make it a slightly less nightmarish hellscape. (Gothamist)

The state’s legislature says it’s time to end the state’s ban on “gravity” knives. The governor has vetoed similar bills twice, but with evidence that the law is selectively enforced against people of color and a recent judge called it “unconstitutional,” he may sign it into law this time. (Patch)

Here’s news you don’t want to hear. Some of the city’s water fountains contain up to 50x the federally allowed amount of lead. 4.5% of early tests came back positive for lead. The entire city is scheduled to be tested by June 14. (Gothamist)

Diners have been an important part of the city for decades, but real estate developers and rising costs of rent have been poisoning diner culture and they’re in danger of disappearing. (NY Times)

The Bowery Mural Wall is ready to turn over, but not without someone tagging the white wall first. (Bowery Boogie)

Hervey Weinstein, a real-world Cloverfield-style monster, tentatively reached a $44 million settlement to resolve the lawsuits against him. (NY Times)

The MTA’s Inspector General will be the sacrificial goat when it comes to the overtime scandal. Governor Cuomo is set to replace 12-year IG Barry Kluger with the governor’s Special Council for Public Integrity Carolyn Pokorny. Gothamist)

Who can you blame for your allergies? Men! Well, kinda. (Atlas Obscura)

Food and drink recommendations on Memorial Day from Grub Street. (Should be obvious this is from Grub Street)

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