The Briefly for July 3, 2020 – The “Hey Kid, Want To Buy A Baseball Team?” July 4th Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: July 4th subway and bus schedules, the St. James Place dance parties, the NYPD refuses to hand over bodycam footage, where to hang out by the water, & more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 90˚
Rain in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 72˚ High: 87˚

The Briefly turns two years old today!

Here is the MTA’s July 4th weekend beach subway and bus schedule. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

On the night of July 4th, we’ll be able to see a buck moon and a lunar eclipse. Don’t be so impressed with the buck moon part, all that means is that it’s the first full moon in July. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

RIP Free Slurpee Day 2020. (Fanni Frankl for amNewYork Metro)

Want to buy the Mets? You have until July 9 to place your bid. Can we start a Go FundMe? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Eight tips for dining outside right now at NYC restaurants. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

More than 20 streets closed to cars citywide will now be dedicated to outdoor dining starting this weekend and lasting every weekend through Labor Day. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

The High Line will reopen on July 16 with a limited capacity. (NY1)

New York City families will be able to keep their children home this fall and opt for a full remote school schedule regardless of medical need. 25% of students surveyed said they were “very” comfortable returning to school. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Alternate side parking will be suspended from July 5 through the 12. The reason given is the pandemic and trying to keep people from making unnecessary trips. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNew York Metro)

Video: Exploring the origins of the St. James Place in Clinton Hill nightly 7 pm dance party. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New York is no longer on track to contain the coronavirus as infection numbers surge to record new highs across the country. At this rate, herd immunity is possible, but it will take years to set it. CT, MA, RI, and VT are on the list of states on the path to contain the virus. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

One of the big questions coming out of the pandemic is its effect on the city’s real estate and it looks like we’re starting to get hints of what’s to come. Median sales prices in Manhattan fell 17.7% compared to this time last year and the volume of sales dropped 54%. (Stefanos Chen and Sydney Franklin for NY Times)

Astoria’s Artopolis Bakery, Gussy’s Bar, and Monika’s Cafe-Bar are now among the 4% of the city’s restaurants and bars that have permanently closed since March. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Do NYC is attempting to compile a list of permanently closed bars and restaurants. (Do NYC)

By the time Governor Cuomo announced day camps could operate this summer and release safety guidelines for them, it was less than a month to their start date. Hundreds of applications for camps from the city rolled into Albany and there hasn’t been enough time for the Health Department to properly review them before being approved, so the summer started with over 225 camp applications sitting in limbo. (Reuven Blau for The City)

You can see the new exhibition Art on the Grid across the city on 500 bus shelters and 1,700 LinkNYC kiosks. The exhibit explores healing and loss, community and isolation, intimacy and solitude, and inclusivity and exclusivity. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times highlights the importance of the bike protests that have spring up around the city since Memorial Day weekend. (Troy Closson and Sean Piccoli for NY Times)

The Times, feeling optimistic, asks: Could New York finally become a bike city? (Sasha von Oldershausen for NY Times)

Photos: The city’s first day with open beaches. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Whitney Hu, a candidate looking to succeed Carlos Menchaca for City Council for District 38, the district at the center of the Industry City rezoning fight. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

The city will spend $80 million toward the reconstruction of 70 Mulberry St, which was destroyed by fire in January, including many items from the Museum of Chinese in America. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Looking to get married but don’t want to leave your car? Now you can get married in a drive-thru. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: Hundreds of people marched from Bay Ridge to the Barclays Center as a part of the international “Day of Rage” ªin opposition to Israel’s occupation and annexation of Palestine. (Meaghan McGoldrick, photos by Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A one-minute explanation of why some animals thrive in NYC and some flounder. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A first look at a proposed mixed-use development on the Astoria/Long Island City that will take up five blocks with twelve buildings that are being called “Innovation QNS,” which is an awful name. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

During the construction of a seawall to protect a train yard in Inwood from another Hurricane Sandy, the MTA unearthed a patrol torpedo boat from the Harlem River that was once commanded by John F. Kennedy. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

How many times have you ridden a subway to the end of a line? Exploring the end of the 2 line. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The problem with asking your employees for their feedback is that they know that you heard it. When WNYC’s newsroom was asked who should lead their daily news coverage them after the harassment and discrimination that plagued the newsroom was brought to light, the answer was clear: a person of color who understood New York, with experience in public radio. Their new boss? A white woman from California with no public radio experience. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

The state is rolling back some of its bail reforms, which took hold six months ago. More charges will be eligible for bail and more categories will be eligible for bail, which will result in more people being sent to jail, which has become an extremely dangerous place to be during the pandemic. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A Blue Lives Matter rally in the Bronx, as you might expect, quickly devolved into the participants screaming obscenities and threatening protesters. Yes, there is video. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says the City Council bowed to “mob rule” when it came to the city’s budget. Mayor de Blasio, never one to not put his foot in his mouth, defended Shea’s comments. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The NYPD has refused to hand over 1,137 requests for body camera footage, according to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which has made investigating complaints “untenable.” It’s this kind of bullshit response for the NYPD, who refuses to take accountability for their actions, that brought us to this moment, where the public’s trust in them has eroded and created the NYPD-led violence during the George Floyd protests. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Making the case for a subway stop in Harlem to be named after Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, who collected one of the world’s largest libraries of African American books, prints, and artifacts and whose collection became the basis for the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library’s Division of Negro Literature, History, and Prints. (Wilfredo Florentino for Streetsblog)

17 outdoor bars and restaurants to hang out at by the water. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 3, 2020 – The “A Bad Omen Washes Ashore at Jacob Riis Park” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Javits Center opens to COVID-19 patients, a takeout and delivery guide, 369,000 New Yorkers file for unemployment, Tekashi69 goes free, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Possible drizzle until evening.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚

The Governor Cuomo’s nipple piercing mystery may be solved? But also the mystery rages on. (Hudon Hongo for Gizmodo)

No matter who you are, if you’re sick or not, it’s time to wear a mask, a bandana, a balaclava, a Spider-Man mask, just cover your face with something if you go out in public. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A 28-foot-long humpback whale washed ashore Tuesday at Jacob Riis Park in Queens. If everything hadn’t already gone to hell, this might be a bad omen. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Just as the coronavirus season is expected to end, this year’s hurricane season is expected to be 40% more active than the average season. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: Inside the USNS Comfort. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Javits Center now has 2,500 beds, up from 1,000, and has been approved for COVID-19 patients. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What happens if we run out of ventilators? While Governor Cuomo says “there’s no protocol,” there’s a 266-page document from 2015 available for download on the state’s website that lays it out step by step. Basically, it boils down to saving the most lives. (Gwynne Hogan and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Craving NYC without going outside? Here’s an exhaustive list of movies featuring Greenwich Village. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

The history of the Brooklyn Blackout cake. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

I linked to the wrong story yesterday giving hard numbers on COVID-19 infections by zip code, here’s a better breakdown of how many are sick per zip code in NYC. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Michelin-starred Eleven Madison Park is turning into a kitchen for Rethink Food, a city-based food nonprofit, thanks to “an undisclosed amount of funding” from American Express. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Rethink Food NYC is offering 30 restaurants $40,000 each to stay open and provide 24,000 meals per day for New Yorkers in need. Eleven Madison Park is not on the list. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds,” but also the postal service has been struggling to deliver the mail with some areas not receiving mail for days at a time due to a severe staffing shortage. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Maybe the last place you want to hang out in during a global pandemic that’s infected over a million people, but the longer the state is on PAUSE, the more outdoor space becomes a luxury. The case for Green-Wood Cemetery. (Nathan Kensinger for Curbed)

Photos: Sakura Park in the Bronx’s cherry blossoms are hitting their peak. It’s been so warm that the cherry blossoms across the city have been blooming. Time to steal a peek if you can find one. (HARLEM + BESPOKE)

A map of who’s open in Western Queens, with over 250 businesses that are open. (Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

A federal judge ordered Gaspar Avendano-Hernandez released from ICE’s custody. You might remember his arrest because Erick Diaz-Cruz his girlfriend’s son was shot in the face by an ICE officer while he was being arrested. Tragically, Diaz-Cruz did not survive. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re among the 369,000 New Yorkers who lost a job in the last week, you know all too well that attempting to apply for benefits is a full-time job in itself. (Daniel Moritz-Rabson for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s daily chats with New York and the nation are getting weird. He dedicated some of Thursday’s press conference to a chat with his brother, who is in quarantine after a COVID-19 diagnosis earlier in the week. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

Maps: New York City is so big (how big is it?) that you can fit the population of multiple cities inside each borough. Brooklyn? Chicago. Staten Island? Sacramento. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Quarantee is like a nightclub, except it all happens on Zoom. You’re charged a cover and somehow “bouncers” enforce a dress code and they even offer “private tables.” I’m at a loss for words. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Anyone else notice lots of masks and rubber gloves littering the streets? (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

It depends on who you believe, but the staff of Montefiore Medical Center may or may not have been given Yankees rain ponchos as personal protective gear for their shifts. (Brian M. Rosenthal and James Wagner for NY Times)

One of the inmates that was released to prevent further COVID-19 outbreaks in the city’s federal prisons? Tekashi69. (Melena Ryzik and Nancy Coleman for NY Times)

A federal judge struck down a portion of the state’s new rent laws that dealt with retroactive rent overcharge claims. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Video: “Typologies of New York City: A Crowdsourced Hyperlapse” 1,246 photos of NY to make one great video. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Do the animals in the Bronx Zoo know something has changed? (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Traffic to the city’s domestic violence website is up 7.8x for the first full week following the state’s declaration of PAUSE. There has been no increase in domestic violence calls to 911, which could mean domestic violence could be going unreported. Call 911 in an emergency, otherwise, the Domestic Violence hotline’s phone number is 1-800-621-4673 (HOPE). (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Mount Sinai researchers are tracking COVID-19 across New York City through a program called STOP COVID NYC. If you have any symptoms, you can participate and help track and predict smaller outbreaks. (Norwood News)

The happy haunts of Green-Wood Cemetery are open to the public for longer in new, expanded hours. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio greeted EMT and paramedics from across the country at Fort Totten Park Thursday morning as they prepared to help New York City’s overburdened emergency medical workers. (Alejandra ‘Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Residential and commercial real estate showings are considered “essential,” but showings can’t happen in person. Are you ready to buy an apartment based on a FaceTime call? (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan and E.B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

How the 2021 mayoral candidates have responded to the coronavirus. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Takeout and delivery options for every situation. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 22, 2018 – Woman Bites Cop, The Spotted Pig Investigated, The Nazi in Queens, and More

The N train goats are headed to live with Jon Stewart, this year’s J’Ouvert festival is approaching, the hidden history of city bookstores, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Woman bites cop. Woman also pepper sprays cop. Woman, Maxine Myod, arrested.

Jakiw Palij, the 95-year-old known Nazi living in Queens, has been deported to Germany.

The Attorney General debate between Democrats candidates was held Tuesday and will air on the Manhattan Neighborhood Network tonight (Wednesday).

AMC’s Los Pollos Hermanos stunt to promote Better Call Saul is back and is delivering free food starting at noon.

New York is the first state in the country on Monday to establish an independent commission with the power to investigate misconduct by state prosecutors, but the future of the law is in question according to a memo from Attorney General Barbara Underwood.

Six public art installations in NYC you shouldn’t miss, from StreetEasy.

The N Train goats are headed upstate to Jon and Tracy Stewart’s Farm Sanctuary.

The New York Attorney General’s office has subpoenaed the holding company that owns The Spotted Pig due to the unsafe work environment caused by owned Ken Friedman and investor Mario Batali.

The 10032-zip code in Harlem is the only location where you can buy for under $500/sf in Manhattan. Property Shark has a built an interactive map of the city showing each zip code and the average price per square foot for a home.

The hidden history of ten NYC bookstores, according to Untapped Cities.

The NYPD’s Intelligence Bureau has fourteen detectives stationed around the world as part of their International Liaison Program. The initial mission was aimed at terrorism but has adapted over time to crime, like the man arrested in Thailand after his baby was found two days prior floating in the East River.

The building with the most complaints about dog barking throughout the entire city is on W. 111th in Harlem. A mutt and two English bulldogs named Yesterday and Tomorrow are the cause of the noise, but their human companion says their sensitive neighbors are to blame.

The Waldorf Astoria renovations are targeting a 2021 end date.

Everything you need to know about this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival in Crown Heights, from Curbed.

How to get a Culture Pass from the NYPL, which gives you access to 33 of the city’s cultural institutions.

The president accused Mayor de Blasio of stealing one of his campaign slogans, but also who gives a shit?

Where to find the cheapest happy hour drink deals in the city, according to amNY.

LeRoy McCarthy has a plan for a permanent tribute to Aretha Franklin at Brooklyn’s Franklin Avenue subway station.


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