The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

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The Briefly for May 10, 2019 – The “Harlem’s WWI War Heroes Who Who Brought Jazz to France” Edition

Closing the Kusher Loophole, OMNY is coming, the officer whose chokehold killed Eric Garner’s disciplinary trial is moving forward, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The subway diversions are minimal this weekend, but when the bar is already so low, it’s hard to get underneath it. (Subway Changes)

Here’s a crazy idea. Is the L train slowdown going okay? (Bklyner)

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial in the death of Eric Garner will go forward, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Thursday. (880 WCBS)

Declawing your cat may soon be illegal. Manhattan Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal’s 2015 bill is gaining traction again thanks to the newly formed Domestic Animal Welfare Committee formed this year. The bill has the support of the Humane Society and Black Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler. (Politico)

The Harlem Hellfighters spent 191 days on the Front during World War I and in their time there, they helped introduce jazz to France and were some of the war’s most decorated soldiers. (6sqft)

It seems like the city shouldn’t have to deter people from parking on sidewalks, but here we are. City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is pushing to put traffic cameras specifically looking to catch drivers who block bike lanes and sidewalks as a part of Transportation Alternatives’ #TechforSafety campaign. (LIC Post)

Scrap the SHSAT test for the city’s elite high schools. That’s the message from Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network chapter in the city. (Politico)

The murder trial of the man accused of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz began with opening statements from the prosecution saying the murder was pre-meditated. (NY City Lens)

Some information about the OMNY system, the new system to replace MetroCards, and how they will work. They’re scheduled to be rolled out at the end of the month, but MetroCards will be around until 2023. (amNY)

The New York Aquarium has four new black-footed penguins, which are endangered. Of course, there are photos of baby penguins. (amNY)

Stop telling people things you heard at parties and actually learn about the city’s tap water. (StreetEasy)

The Soho Grifter was sentenced to 4-12 years, fined $24,000 and ordered to pay back $199,000. The only thing the fake German heiress will inherit is a prison jumpsuit. (NY Times)

The cheapest one-bedroom apartments in the city are, unsurprisingly, in far-flung neighborhoods, but who can argue with a one-bedroom for less than $1500? (Patch)

Here’s a quiz on what you can or can’t do on the subway. If you fail, you have to move to Hoboken. Sorry, those are just the rules. (Gothamist)

As it fights to contain the measles outbreak, the city’s attention is starting to turn towards schools with less than 90% vaccination rates, like the Brooklyn Waldorf School, which 24% of students are unvaccinated. (NY Times)

If you’ve never had the, uh, pleasure of driving in Manhattan, here’s a video to give you an idea of what it’s like. (Viewing NYC)

Here are the neighborhoods where it takes the NYPD the longest to respond to a 911 call. (Patch)

Where to pick up your picnic vittles near to the city park of your choice. (amNY)

Del Posto was named the best Italian restaurant in the nation by The Daily Meal. Eleven restaurants in the city made the top fifty. (Patch)

Take a look inside the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport one week before its opening day. (Curbed)

2019: After the Fall of New York. Imagine an 80s b-movie version of Children of Men, Escape From New York, Mad Max and Beneath the Planet of the Apes, but shittier and you’ll end up with this Italian movie. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s 17 new approved bills is aimed at closing the “Kushner loophole,” which allowed landlords to falsely claim the number of rent-regulated tenants in its buildings. (6sqft)

Shakespeare & Co is opening a bookstore in Brookfield Place in Battery Park, where Amazon just opened a new store. (amNY)

21 of the best LGBTQ bars in NYC to party at right now, depending on the time of day you read this. (amNY)

The mayor is calling the NYC Care card a “new health coverage option,” but it’s more of a public awareness campaign for pre-existed public services form the city. It’s a public awareness campaign that can improve public health, but the mayor is clearly misrepresenting it as health insurance because of his delusional idea that anyone wants to see him run for president. (Gothamist)

A mini-Smorgasburg is coming to Hudson Yards. Heaven forbid that people who live there have to go to Brooklyn for anything. (6sqft)

Rene Samaniego, an NYPD vice detective, admitted to participating in a prolific prostitution ring and gambling enterprise throughout Queens, Brooklyn and Nassau County. (QNS)

Chartwell Booksellers, the world’s only Winston Churchill bookstore, has been nearly hidden for 36 years on E 52nd St. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to rooftop bars and outdoor drinking in 2019. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for April 26, 2019 – The “We Never Thought It Happen, But Here We Are” Edition

This weekend begins the L train apocalypse-lite, the Flower District is endangered, a bottle of seltzer stopped the F train cold, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

It’s been three years in the making and three months in the re-making, but this weekend the L train construction finally begins. Getting around is gonna be trying, but if you take the MTA at their word, things are still gonna be terrible if you need to get anywhere along the line. (Gothamist)

Here we go. The L Train Slowdown is finally upon us. You won’t find the L train on any lists of diversions or service changes, it will be running once every 20 minutes. The damage to the subways this weekend is relatively minimal. (Subway Changes)

One thing is certain about the L train slowdown: Like any great compromise, no one is happy. (NY Times)

Pollen is high and AccuWeather suggests if you have allergies that you should stay indoors until October. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio revealed his budget, which increased by $300 million compared to his preliminary budget and is up $3.4 billion from last year. (Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to Show World, which survived from 1977 until 2019, the last vestige of Midtown’s porno and prostitution history. (Curbed)

Body parts were found on the F tracks in Gravesend after NYPD officials supposedly removed the victim from the scene on Monday night. The body hasn’ been identified, but the police believe he was a Marine Park resident. (Bklyner)

The 64 people killed on NYC streets in 2019 is up by 49% from last year at the same time. The total amount of crashes are down, but there are still 560 crashes every day. (Streetsblog)

Deep breaths while you hear this. It was a bottle of seltzer, not an emergency brake, that jammed up the F train on Wednesday morning. A bottle of seltzer. (Gothamist)

10 “fun” facts about Central Park. (Untapped Cities)

The Queens Public Library’s One Court Square branch has been paying an annual rent of $1 since 1989 for the first floor of the Citigroup Building in Long Island City, but without Amazon temporarily taking up residence in the building the library is facing the boot when their lease ends on August 31. (The City)

Built that wall, but instead of a megalomaniac’s useless pet-project, it’s a 4.3-mile seawall off the coast of Staten Island to protect against climate change and prevent another Sandy. (Curbed)

Bushwick is heading for a rezoning. Five years after residents complained about the development in the neighborhood the Bushwick Neighborhood Plan calls for creating and preserving affordable homes, parks, historic buildings, and small businesses. (6sqft)

“Every time you say you’re taking out a lane, you’re slowing traffic down. I don’t care what they’re saying, it slows traffic down.” -Community Board 9’s Transportation Chairperson Carolyn Thompson. There’s no arguing with someone who concedes they don’t and won’t believe facts. (Streetsblog)

The NYC version of “Millennials are killing,” is “rising rents are killing.” Their next victim could be Manhattan’s flower district. (NY Times)

Next time you find yourself between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges in Manhattan, think about how that neighborhood was once known as the “Lung Block,” a slum with whose name indicates the high rate of tuberculosis. (6sqft)

New Yorkers love some dog breeds more than others, and a king of the canines has been crowned. (Patch)

After a staff revolt at the Museum of Natural History, a gala honoring Brazilian president and a man who “would be incapable of loving a homosexual son,” Jair Bolsonaro will take place at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square. (Gothamist)

Sweetgreen, makers of salad and a once favorite of former HQ host Scott Rogowsky, has abandoned their cashless policy amid a growing backlash against cashless businesses. (NY Times)

Broadway is car-free from Union Square to Times Square to celebrate Earth Day on Saturday from 9am to 3pm. (Gothamist)

It’s National Pretzel Day, go out on the street and get yourself a classic NYC salty bread snack at the nearest cart. If you’re too good for a street pretzel, here are some snootier options. (Patch)

Is Jersey Governor Phil Murphy playing make-believe or is MTA chairperson Pat Foye out of the loop? Murphy continues to insist that he has a “conceptual understanding” with Governor Cuomo about giving Jersey drivers a congestion pricing discount and Foye says he has “no idea” about what Murphy is talking about. (Politico)

Maybe it’s time we accept that the LinkNYC kiosks are surveillance data-sponges. Police arrested 41-year-old Juan Rodriguez for smashing up dozens of the kiosks. (Gothamist)

The mayor, now known for keeping to a deadline, moved up his estimation of when Rikers Island will close from 2027 to 2026. (Patch)

The worst person in the city has been found. Dominiqua Parrish is accused of throwing a small dog down a trash chute on the seventh floor, believing she was throwing the dog into an incinerator. The dog was saved and was treated for scrapes and bruises by the ASPCA. (QNS)

Over 40 art shows to see right now. (NY Times)

Anna Delvey/Sorokin, the Soho Grifter, was found guilty of most of the charges against her. “Fake it till you make it” said her lawyer. Looks like she might make 15 years in prison. (NY Times)

Support for driver’s licenses for all is growing amongst New York voters. (Gotham Gazette)

10 neighborhoods where rents are going down. (Street Easy)

A good (and long) weekend read: “Her ‘Prince Charming’ Turned Out to Be a Crazed Hit Man on the Run” (NY Times)

Fabián von Hauske Valtierra, the winner of Eater’s best desserts award in 2018, picks his top five desserts in the city. (Eater)

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