The Briefly for July 23, 2019 – The “Maybe Hackers Can Run the Subways Better” Edition

The In-N-Out Burger mystery, the city’s power outages continue, the subway commuting disasters continue, in pursuit of the perfect ice cream sundae, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Department of Sanitation’s trash museum is only available to be seen once a month when Nelson Molina, the man behind the collection, gives tours, but a few hundred items of the collection is on display at the East Harlem Gallery as part of the “What is Here is Open” exhibition. (Curbed)

The MTA’s proposed express F service is, surprise surprise, opposed by the neighborhoods that don’t have express stops. (Brooklyn Paper)

Transit President Andy Byford hasn’t said what caused Friday’s monumental screw up with the subways, but he has said that it was not the result of outside tampering. At this point, maybe Russia can run our transit system better than the people in charge. (amNY)

Another day, another commuting nightmare. Monday night’s 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains were mostly out of service in Brooklyn fur to faulty signals. Combine that with a storm that provided limited transportation alternatives and it’s just another day on the subways. (Gothamist)

The closest In-N-Out Burger to NYC might be in Texas, so how did a pristine Double-Double end up on the street in Jamaica, Queens? (QNS)

The Department of Education says that they “successfully completed remediation work” or removing lead from the drinking water at many Bushwick schools, but three schools are showing higher levels of lead in the drinking water after the work was complete. (Bushwick Daily)

How far would you go to protect your view? The residents of a building in Chelsea bought the air rights to a neighboring property for $11 million so their views of the Empire State Building remained disturbed. (Curbed)

Photos from Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake. (Untapped Cities)

A new city council bill with 22 co-sponsors will fine businesses $1,000 for not accepting cash or charging cash-paying customers more, with a few exceptions, if it is approved. (amNY)

I am the left.” The governor has never been shy about talking shit when it comes to his fellow Democrats. (NY Times)

Despite their performance as of late, including the sky-lighting incident in Astoria and the pipe-explosion in Flatiron, ConEd wants to raise its rates for electricity. What do they think they are, the MTA? (The Indypendent)

50,000 New Yorkers were without power on Sunday and as of Monday morning, there were still 19,000 that were left in the dark. A portion of the blackout was intentionally caused by ConEd in a supposed attempt to prevent wider outages. (Curbed)

The mayor is calling for an investigation to whether the city needs a new entity to provide electricity. The governor has already made direct threats towards replacing ConEd. (Politico)

Why did ConEd choose the neighborhoods that it did in Southeast Brooklyn to intentionally blackout? What was it about Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, and Canarsie made them different than Park Slope, Sunset Park, Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, or Dumbo to have their power intentionally shut off? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you lost power, you can fill out a form on ConEd’s website to get some money back. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

In pursuit of the perfect sundae. (Grub Street)

10 suggestions to fix the lighting in your dim apartment. (Street Easy)

Declawing cats is officially illegal in New York state. Technically “declawing” is an amputation surgery which removes the first bone of the cat’s toe and also takes with it tendons and muscles. Unnecessary declawing carries with it a fine. (Gothamist)

Remember the 7 train’s falling debris problem? Never ones to be accused of anything that has the appearance of being timely, the MTA is finally testing new netting to prevent future impalings of anything that dares travel below a 7 train. (amNY)

Ever wonder what a manhole explosion looks like? Here’s a video. (Greenpointers)

The attorney general’s office is invoking the “Son of Sam Law” to prevent the Soho Grifter Anna Sorokin’s profit off the sale of her life rights to Netflix. The Son of Sam Law prevents offenders from profiting off their crimes. (Gothamist)

If you had to do your job using faulty video conferencing systems, you’d be frustrated. If your job was a court interpreter at immigration hearings, it’s orders of magnitude larger than simple frustration. (Gothamist)

Two lawsuits have accused the governor of trying to diminish their power by changing the state’s fusion voting system. (NY Times)

15 secrets of The Frick Collection. (Untapped Cities)

The first report from the federal monitor in charge of overseeing the city’s lead problems in NYCHA developments isn’t very encouraging. (amNY)

The state is considering banning the sale of your phone’s location without your express permission. The bill will be introduced on Tuesday. (NY Times)

“Where should we eat?” says your friend/family member/rando on the street who is visiting New York for the first time. Suddenly you freeze because your collection of restaurants that you visit regularly don’t seem adequate for someone visiting for the weekend and may never return. The first timer’s guide to eating in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 18, 2019 – The “Please Insert A Floppy Disk to Upgrade the Subways” Edition

The Green Light bill passed, marijuana legalization, e-bikes and e-scooters are still up for grabs, the best restaurants in Chinatown and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The governor is adding 500 law enforcement officers to the subway to fight back against assaults and the MTA’s fear of fare evasion. (amNY)

This week in animals stopping the subways: a turkey stopped the N train in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

The subway is powered by OS/2, IBM’s computer operating system that dates back to the early 90s. (Tedium)

I think we need a full ban on any helicopters going over Manhattan itself.” – Mayor de Blasio. (6sqft)

Staten Island is getting 77 “state-of-the-art” buses. So far the MTA’s overhaul in Staten Island has sped up the buses by 12%. Still short of the mayor’s 25% goal, but if it works in Staten Island, it has hopes in the rest of the city. (Curbed)

The ‘Renewable Rikers Act’ was introduced in the city council to transform Rikers into a renewable energy center, sponsored by Astoria’s Councilmember Costa Constanides and Helen Rosenthal. (Give Me Astoria)

It’s the summertime, so it’s time to look for some new cocktails. A look across the city’s bars at drinks like The Donkey Kong, A Song of Ice and Fire, The Canary, and any other drinks ith great names. (amNY)

The summer mosquito spraying is beginning. (Patch)

Are these sandwiches worth hour-long waits? Through July 13th, you’ve got your chance at Otto. (Gothamist)

I think I’m sort of a laid back, cool dude in a loose mood.” Governor Andrew “cool dude, loose mood” Cuomo. (@JimmyVielkind)

RIP Gloria Vanderbilt, fashion designer, socialite, and Anderson Cooper’s mother. (CNN)

Video: The story of the rise and fall of Anna Delvy, the socialite grifter. (Cheddar)

The Green Light bill, the bill that will provide undocumented immigrants the opportunity to have drivers licenses, is now the Green Light law. (NY Times)

Battery Park is built on a landfill, but in the late 70s and early years of the 80s, Battery Park was a beach. If you’ve never seen photos of Battery Park before Battery Park, it’s a wild sight. (NY Times)

Paul Manafort was scheduled to be moved to Rikers Island, Attorney General Bill Barr’s top deputy intervened. He’s likely to be held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in lower Manhattan. (NY Times)

Ten secrets of Queens’ Fort Totten Park. (Untapped Cities)

Watch Dominique Ansel make his most popular item: the DKA. (Viewing NYC)

Brooklyn, are you ready for another special election next week? (The Brooklyn Reader)

Albany appears to be working at its hardest as the end of the legislative session is approaching. Legalizing electric bikes and scooters are on the docket. There are some peculiar exceptions in the bill, like no company can rent scooters in Manhattan and scooters would be banned from the Hudson River Greenway, but it’s a start. (Streetsblog)

The state’s legislative session is ending on Wednesday and lawmakers are described as “frantic” to pass marijuana legalization before their summer break. (NY Times)

Gem Spa on Second Ave and St Marks isn’t going anywhere. Despite “Everything Must Go!” signs, the owners have reassured the community that they are “very much open for business” and simply had to clear the sidewalk. (EV Grieve)

The ASPCA is scheduled to open three low-cost vet clinics in the city for people who can’t otherwise afford the care their companions may need. (amNY)

The city’s animal shelters were supposed to go “no kill” by 2015. So what happened? (Gothamist)

23 LGBT landmarks of the East Village and Noho. (6sqft)

There will be no subway disruptions during World Pride weekend on the 29th and 30th. (Gothamist)

“Avoid walking across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset” and other tips from the New York Times on how to survive WorldPride weekend as one of the expected four million revelers. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in Chinatown. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

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