The Briefly for February 16-18, 2021 – The “Because Whoopi Goldberg Told Me To” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 22 hour subway service starts soon, drama in the bird community, the Soho Grifter is out, the oldest bars on the UWS, and more

Today – Low: 20˚ High: 44˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

22-hour subway service will start on 2/22, shutting down daily from 2-4 am. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Nearly a quarter of New York City’s students with disabilities have not received all of the services they’re entitled to this school year, according to new figures that offer the most comprehensive picture yet of special education during the pandemic. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The MTA got 25 celebrities to record Covid-19 PSAs for the subways. Finally New Yorkers will follow mask and social distancing guidelines because Michael Rapaport and Whoopi Goldberg told them to. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• The seawall to protect Staten Island from another Hurricane Sandy was scheduled to be finished this year, but construction isn’t expected to be finished for another five years or more. Radiation from a 1940s landfill in Great Kills Park halted progress on the East Shore Seawall as the city, state, and federal governments fight over who”s responsible for getting rid of the radiation. (Clifford Michel for The City)

The Bronx is #2 highest risk in the country from natural disasters only behind Los Angeles. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

• Green-Wood Cemetery wants your help to identify thousands of WWII soldiers buried at the cemetery. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

• Good question: What does the mayor of NYC actually do? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A look at how the roots of the NAACP run through Greenwich Village. (Joey Rodriguez for GVSHP)

• Video: Kissaki chef Mark Garcia makes 200-300 omakase to-go boxes every night. (Director Pelin Keskin for Eater)

• It’s not just your imagination, the city’s snowstorms have been getting worse. (Lydia McMullen-Laird for Gothamist)

• If you’re in the latest group of New Yorkers eligible for the vaccine, you’ve learned that the state’s vaccine website is utter garbage and can’t keep up with demand. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The alleged subway stabber, Rigoberto Lopez, was arrested. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

NYC’s bird watching community is feeling the pressure of popularity after getting a wider amount of interest form the general public in the last year. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

• Anna Sorokin aka Anna Delvey, the fake heiress grifter convicted of grand larceny, is out of prison and working on a memoir and a TV show. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Revel is expanding its service to electric bikes for a subscription cost of $90/month. you’ll get a pedal-assisted bike to use for as long as you’re a subscriber rather than their traditional model of looking for one on the street. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

9 indie Brooklyn bookstores to visit. (Emilie Murphy for Brooklyn Magazine)

• Governor Cuomo almost apologized, but still didn’t, for his administration’s actions that led to the Covid-19 nursing scandal. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

What it’s like to run a movie theater, the Cobble Hill Cinema, in a pandemic. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Thanks to reader Lolita for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 23, 2019 – The “Maybe Hackers Can Run the Subways Better” Edition

The In-N-Out Burger mystery, the city’s power outages continue, the subway commuting disasters continue, in pursuit of the perfect ice cream sundae, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Department of Sanitation’s trash museum is only available to be seen once a month when Nelson Molina, the man behind the collection, gives tours, but a few hundred items of the collection is on display at the East Harlem Gallery as part of the “What is Here is Open” exhibition. (Curbed)

The MTA’s proposed express F service is, surprise surprise, opposed by the neighborhoods that don’t have express stops. (Brooklyn Paper)

Transit President Andy Byford hasn’t said what caused Friday’s monumental screw up with the subways, but he has said that it was not the result of outside tampering. At this point, maybe Russia can run our transit system better than the people in charge. (amNY)

Another day, another commuting nightmare. Monday night’s 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains were mostly out of service in Brooklyn fur to faulty signals. Combine that with a storm that provided limited transportation alternatives and it’s just another day on the subways. (Gothamist)

The closest In-N-Out Burger to NYC might be in Texas, so how did a pristine Double-Double end up on the street in Jamaica, Queens? (QNS)

The Department of Education says that they “successfully completed remediation work” or removing lead from the drinking water at many Bushwick schools, but three schools are showing higher levels of lead in the drinking water after the work was complete. (Bushwick Daily)

How far would you go to protect your view? The residents of a building in Chelsea bought the air rights to a neighboring property for $11 million so their views of the Empire State Building remained disturbed. (Curbed)

Photos from Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake. (Untapped Cities)

A new city council bill with 22 co-sponsors will fine businesses $1,000 for not accepting cash or charging cash-paying customers more, with a few exceptions, if it is approved. (amNY)

I am the left.” The governor has never been shy about talking shit when it comes to his fellow Democrats. (NY Times)

Despite their performance as of late, including the sky-lighting incident in Astoria and the pipe-explosion in Flatiron, ConEd wants to raise its rates for electricity. What do they think they are, the MTA? (The Indypendent)

50,000 New Yorkers were without power on Sunday and as of Monday morning, there were still 19,000 that were left in the dark. A portion of the blackout was intentionally caused by ConEd in a supposed attempt to prevent wider outages. (Curbed)

The mayor is calling for an investigation to whether the city needs a new entity to provide electricity. The governor has already made direct threats towards replacing ConEd. (Politico)

Why did ConEd choose the neighborhoods that it did in Southeast Brooklyn to intentionally blackout? What was it about Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, and Canarsie made them different than Park Slope, Sunset Park, Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, or Dumbo to have their power intentionally shut off? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you lost power, you can fill out a form on ConEd’s website to get some money back. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

In pursuit of the perfect sundae. (Grub Street)

10 suggestions to fix the lighting in your dim apartment. (Street Easy)

Declawing cats is officially illegal in New York state. Technically “declawing” is an amputation surgery which removes the first bone of the cat’s toe and also takes with it tendons and muscles. Unnecessary declawing carries with it a fine. (Gothamist)

Remember the 7 train’s falling debris problem? Never ones to be accused of anything that has the appearance of being timely, the MTA is finally testing new netting to prevent future impalings of anything that dares travel below a 7 train. (amNY)

Ever wonder what a manhole explosion looks like? Here’s a video. (Greenpointers)

The attorney general’s office is invoking the “Son of Sam Law” to prevent the Soho Grifter Anna Sorokin’s profit off the sale of her life rights to Netflix. The Son of Sam Law prevents offenders from profiting off their crimes. (Gothamist)

If you had to do your job using faulty video conferencing systems, you’d be frustrated. If your job was a court interpreter at immigration hearings, it’s orders of magnitude larger than simple frustration. (Gothamist)

Two lawsuits have accused the governor of trying to diminish their power by changing the state’s fusion voting system. (NY Times)

15 secrets of The Frick Collection. (Untapped Cities)

The first report from the federal monitor in charge of overseeing the city’s lead problems in NYCHA developments isn’t very encouraging. (amNY)

The state is considering banning the sale of your phone’s location without your express permission. The bill will be introduced on Tuesday. (NY Times)

“Where should we eat?” says your friend/family member/rando on the street who is visiting New York for the first time. Suddenly you freeze because your collection of restaurants that you visit regularly don’t seem adequate for someone visiting for the weekend and may never return. The first timer’s guide to eating in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 18, 2019 – The “Please Insert A Floppy Disk to Upgrade the Subways” Edition

The Green Light bill passed, marijuana legalization, e-bikes and e-scooters are still up for grabs, the best restaurants in Chinatown and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The governor is adding 500 law enforcement officers to the subway to fight back against assaults and the MTA’s fear of fare evasion. (amNY)

This week in animals stopping the subways: a turkey stopped the N train in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

The subway is powered by OS/2, IBM’s computer operating system that dates back to the early 90s. (Tedium)

I think we need a full ban on any helicopters going over Manhattan itself.” – Mayor de Blasio. (6sqft)

Staten Island is getting 77 “state-of-the-art” buses. So far the MTA’s overhaul in Staten Island has sped up the buses by 12%. Still short of the mayor’s 25% goal, but if it works in Staten Island, it has hopes in the rest of the city. (Curbed)

The ‘Renewable Rikers Act’ was introduced in the city council to transform Rikers into a renewable energy center, sponsored by Astoria’s Councilmember Costa Constanides and Helen Rosenthal. (Give Me Astoria)

It’s the summertime, so it’s time to look for some new cocktails. A look across the city’s bars at drinks like The Donkey Kong, A Song of Ice and Fire, The Canary, and any other drinks ith great names. (amNY)

The summer mosquito spraying is beginning. (Patch)

Are these sandwiches worth hour-long waits? Through July 13th, you’ve got your chance at Otto. (Gothamist)

I think I’m sort of a laid back, cool dude in a loose mood.” Governor Andrew “cool dude, loose mood” Cuomo. (@JimmyVielkind)

RIP Gloria Vanderbilt, fashion designer, socialite, and Anderson Cooper’s mother. (CNN)

Video: The story of the rise and fall of Anna Delvy, the socialite grifter. (Cheddar)

The Green Light bill, the bill that will provide undocumented immigrants the opportunity to have drivers licenses, is now the Green Light law. (NY Times)

Battery Park is built on a landfill, but in the late 70s and early years of the 80s, Battery Park was a beach. If you’ve never seen photos of Battery Park before Battery Park, it’s a wild sight. (NY Times)

Paul Manafort was scheduled to be moved to Rikers Island, Attorney General Bill Barr’s top deputy intervened. He’s likely to be held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in lower Manhattan. (NY Times)

Ten secrets of Queens’ Fort Totten Park. (Untapped Cities)

Watch Dominique Ansel make his most popular item: the DKA. (Viewing NYC)

Brooklyn, are you ready for another special election next week? (The Brooklyn Reader)

Albany appears to be working at its hardest as the end of the legislative session is approaching. Legalizing electric bikes and scooters are on the docket. There are some peculiar exceptions in the bill, like no company can rent scooters in Manhattan and scooters would be banned from the Hudson River Greenway, but it’s a start. (Streetsblog)

The state’s legislative session is ending on Wednesday and lawmakers are described as “frantic” to pass marijuana legalization before their summer break. (NY Times)

Gem Spa on Second Ave and St Marks isn’t going anywhere. Despite “Everything Must Go!” signs, the owners have reassured the community that they are “very much open for business” and simply had to clear the sidewalk. (EV Grieve)

The ASPCA is scheduled to open three low-cost vet clinics in the city for people who can’t otherwise afford the care their companions may need. (amNY)

The city’s animal shelters were supposed to go “no kill” by 2015. So what happened? (Gothamist)

23 LGBT landmarks of the East Village and Noho. (6sqft)

There will be no subway disruptions during World Pride weekend on the 29th and 30th. (Gothamist)

“Avoid walking across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset” and other tips from the New York Times on how to survive WorldPride weekend as one of the expected four million revelers. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in Chinatown. (The Infatuation)

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