The Briefly for July 9, 2020 – The “They Don’t Call it a Subway Doomsday for Nothing” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s plan for schools in September, the worst place in NYC, wait times for Covid-19 test results slip, frozen boozy drinks, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 85˚
Humid throughout the day.

What’s the worst place in NYC? Seems there’s some consensus around Penn Station. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Despite what he may think, the president doesn’t actually have control over how the city’s schools operate. Mayor de Blasio’s plan, which is only a plan, is still subject to the state’s approval. Early August is the state’s deadline for approving or modifying the city’s plan. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s schools are facing $642 million in budget cuts. The city’s private schools received tens of millions of dollars from the federal government’s PPP program. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor announced his plan for school openings in the fall. His plans call for a partial reopening this September. Classroom attendance would be limited to one to three days a week. While it’s a burden for children, teachers, parents, the economy, and everyone involved, it’s a burden that is not worse than death, which is what his plan is hoping to prevent. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

A deeper dive into the options already presented for the city’s schools for in-person learning. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Here’s a terrifying map of what the city’s subways could look like if the MTA doesn’t get any federal assistance and uses the Riders Alliance 2010 “Doomsday on the MTA” report. To accommodate the loss in revenues, the MTA would have to cut the 1, 2, 3, 7, B, D, F, M, G, J, Z, and Franklin Avenue Shuttle. They don’t call it doomsday for nothing. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Things were already projected to be bad for the MTA, but for each tax dollar the city doesn’t collect, the MTA is pushed further and further into the economic abyss. The MTA’s projected tax revenue for 2021 will be $1.4 billion lower than expected. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The subways shut down for four hours a day and that may seem inconvenient, but a transit strike in 1966 shut the subways down for two weeks. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A Queens driver hit and killed 64-year-old Richard O’Flaherty in Far Rockaway on Tuesday. The driver was not charged. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Governors Island will reopen on July 15th for “passive recreation” from 10 am – 7 pm. You’ll need tickets in advance and they can be reserved beginning on Friday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: It used to be a school, now it’s a $22.5 million penthouse with four bedrooms, a two-level terrace, and a double-sided marble fireplace. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Why the hell is the NYPD protecting statues of Christopher Columbus across the city 24/7? (Gerch Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Someone driving an SUV drove through a crowd of protesters in Times Square, sending at least one to the hospital. The driver was taken into custody, but not arrested or charged. If the NYPD can do it with initial mayoral support and no consequences, what’s to stop a citizen from doing the same thing? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an “entirely new accountability structure” for the NYPD, including reducing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s role in overseeing the force. Under James’ recommendation, a commission of the City Council, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and the mayor would have control over the NYPD’s budget. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The development announced for the failed Amazon HQ2 site has hit a wall: City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Without Van Bramer’s support, the project’s needed rezoning can’t happen. Long Island City’s newly constructed apartments are 60% empty. This plan would bring an additional 2,700 apartments to the area. Van Bramer’s idea for the land is simple: it’s public land and should be used by the public. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

8 tips for negotiating your lease renewal in NYC. (Localize.City)

In an article about how graffiti is on the rise during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Times starts by saying the conditions are perfect for “a new generation of graffiti writers.” The Old Gray Lady indeed. (David Gonzalez for NY Times)

The city’s oldest gay bar, Julius’ Bar, launched a GoFundMe campaign to keep the bar and it employees afloat until indoor dining comes back, which may be a while. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The availability for Covid-19 testing has increased across the city, but the availability of labs to process those tests hasn’t risen to meet the demand. As a result, wait times for test results have slipped from the three-day range to upwards of a week. Is your result still relevant if it’s been a week since the test? (Elizabeth Kim and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Where to pick up food near Central Park. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The staff at Jack the Horse in Brooklyn Heights are accusing the owners of misusing thousands of dollars in donations intended for employees. The GoFundMe states (errors and all) “We still hoping to raise money to support our wonderful staff who are out of work due to COVID-19.” The owners paid food and alcohol vendors and insurance bills with the $15,000+ of donations to the GoFundMe. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A five-story building partially collapsed in Murray Hill on E 38th in Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. One person was injured and was brought to the hospital. (Ben Yakas and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

What’s your favorite pre-pandemic food? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A few NYC holy grail apartments: 2 bedrooms for under $2,000 a month. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

The story of how an Angela Davis quote ended up being displayed prominently towards the Barclays Center subway entrance. (Norman Oder for BKLYNER)

The Board of Elections in New York City turns Election Day into Groundhog Day—we see the same problematic deficiencies each cycle: despite a bipartisan cross-ideological desire to fix them, they reoccur like clockwork. The time has come to use the important expansion of vote-by-mail to finally fix these consistent problems.
– City Councilmember Carline Rivera, Voting by mail must be expanded to fix existing problems

Interactive Map: More than 13,000 Manhattan-based businesses secured loans of more than $150,000 from the federal government through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Major League Soccer announced the schedule for their summer tournament and NYCFC’s first game is today (Thursday) morning at 9 am. (Joe Pantorno for Bronx Times)

RIP Jane Walentas, the artist behind the three-decade restoration of Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

Twenty places across the city to enjoy nature. (Jenna Fanelli for Bronx Times)

The city will only retain 50 of its 95 park rangers, thanks to the city’s budget cuts. In a budget of $88.2 billion, the cuts to the park ranger program are saving $10 million, or 0.01% of the budget. (Reuven Blau for The City)

13 places to get frozen boozy drinks in Astoria. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 10, 2020 – The “An Actual Piece of Good News for NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of NYC restaurants, the repeal of 50a, each borough gets a Black Lives Matter street, support for disbanding the NYPD, restaurant guide, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 80˚
Rain overnight.

Mayor de Blasio announced that while the city may seem ready for a June 22 phase two reopening, we shouldn’t expect phase two to begin before July. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Sunday was a new low for the city in a good way. Only 1% of people tested for Covid-19 tested positive. Hospital admittances were at 52 on Sunday, far from the peak at 850. Transmission is still high, with hundreds of new cases every day. This good news isn’t a reason to stop being careful, it’s signs that what we are doing is working. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is supporting the idea of disbanding the NYPD, looking to follow Minneapolis’s lead. Police Benevolent Association President Pat Lynch is against the idea, but let’s be clear about this, he doesn’t get to have a seat at the table or a voice in this discussion. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The State Senate voted to repeal 50a. Governor Cuomo has vowed to sign the legislation. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

City courts are scheduled to reopen starting today since their closure in March, with precautions. Outside of emergencies, most matters will still be handled virtually. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Here are the rules for outdoor dining, which is allowed starting with phase two, slated for June 22. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

That hasn’t stopped restaurants from putting out tables and chairs for customers, which are inevitably used for dining. The most blatant is the White Horse Tavern, which announced it was open for business on Instagram and has been encouraging customers to use the tables and chairs for dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state has released its rules for indoor dining, as portions of the state are already looking at phase three. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If tables aren’t placed more than six feet apart, restaurants may have to construct five-foot barriers, ie. cubicles, between the tables with a maximum of 10 people per table. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deeper look at six critical points for restaurants before reopening. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Alibi Lounge, one of the city’s only Black-owned LGBTQ bars is in danger of closing. There is a GoFundMe, which is at $11,000 of its $50,000 goal. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

When will you be ready to go back to concerts, fly in an airplane, or attend a dinner party? The Times asked 511 epidemiologists and the short version is that it could be a year or more before things come close to returning to normal. (Margot Sanger-Katz, Claire Cain Miller and Quoctrung Bui for NY Times)

Today’s hero is former Mayor de Blasio Senior Adviser Alison Hirsh, who resigned after the mayor’s near-unconditional defense of the NYPD and will begin as an adviser to Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza in the Department of Education. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Now that the City Council and state legislature have rendered his opinion unnecessary for public debate, the mayor is in support of banning chokeholds and possible NYPD funding cuts. Always ready to take a stand one second after it doesn’t matter. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“But right now we’re asking him to speak up, we’re asking him to stand behind his campaign, we’re asking him to stand behind his mission of equity, we’re asking him to just support us. He isn’t listening to us.” Why did Mayor de Blasio’s staffers protest him on Monday? (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Photos: Just because curfew is over does not mean the protests in support of Black Lives Matter have stopped. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Portraits: Why we are protesting. (Hiram Alejandro Durán for The City)

Officer Vincent D’Andraia was charged with assault for shoving a woman protesting to the ground. He’ll be charged with misdemeanor assault for the incident. The victim of his assault hit her head on the ground and sustained a concussion and seizure after the attack. (John Del Signore and JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Video: Wrapping up the NYPD union’s garbage rhetoric in one minute and nine seconds. (@bubbaprog)

One street in each of the five boroughs will be painted to send a message to New York City: Black Lives Matter, mirroring Washington DC’s tactics. The streets were not specified when the announcement was made. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Recent reports have been raising concerns that the NYPD’s Intelligence Division, along with the FBI, have been questioning protesters arrested on curfew violations about their political sympathies and affiliations, along with their social media behavior. This would violate a 35-year-old consent decree meant to keep the police from investigation protected political speech. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A guide to New York City’s sculpture parks. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Sometimes you need to turn your mind off and look at a list of banal things. Here are 11 celebrities spending their quarantine in NYC. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

So you’ve optimized your bedroom and workspace while suffering through the quarantine for Covid-19, it’s time to turn your attention to some creative entryway ideas. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 1, representing Greenpoint and Williamsburg, bought itself an SUV with public funds last year, which wasn’t the most popular decision. It was scheduled to hold executive committee elections this month, but the board has introduced a measure to suspend this year’s elections. Nothing like an old-fashioned power grab in the middle of a crisis. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Say farewell to whatever the hell “Rhode Island-style” pizza was supposed to be. After a year in the East Village, Violet is closing its doors. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A Bronx Democrat City Councilmember who has publicly said may vote for Trump, has made openly homophobic statements, and opposes abortion. Meet Rubén Díaz Sr., who wants to represent the Bronx in Congress. (Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

“The winner in the 15th Congressional District will face untold numbers of issues in office next year. The candidate we believe will most closely align himself with the values and goals we hold dear is Ritchie Torres. And we know only too well that the election of Ruben Diaz, Sr., would be a tragic step backwards for the cause of equality and inclusion in American society.
-Paul Schindler for Gay City News, Progressives Must Unite Around Ritchie Torres in the Bronx

Photos: Congrats to the winners of Coney Island USA’s “Maskies” face mask competition. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Apartment Porn: An $2 million Hamilton Heights apartment with a roof deck as big as the apartment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Harlem’s Schomburg Center released the Black Liberation Reading List, a list of 95 books that foster a greater understanding of Black history and culture. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

NYC restaurant reopening guide. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 11, 2020 – The “A Huge Amount of Restraint by the NYPD” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo did not extend NY PAUSE past May 15, the Rent Guidelines Board explained, the NYC dessert delivery guide, Spike Lee’s NYC love letter, & more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 60˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

NY is not extending PAUSE through June 6. Early reporting stated that incorrectly. What happened over the weekend is Governor Cuomo extending New York’s state of emergency. Regions of the state that meet the state’s criteria will be opening, but in the city we can all but guarantee that we’re going last. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: An Upper East Side Townhouse with an indoor pool, a wild spiral staircase, and a dining room larger than most apartments. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Details on the deal that resulted in New York paying some schmuck $86 million for ventilators that never materialized. Maybe New York is the schmuck in this deal. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Thomas Kaplan for NY Times)

Black and brown New Yorkers received more than 80 percent of social distancing summons handed out by the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I was on the floor, I thought I was going to die.” A first-hand account from Adegoke Atunbi of being arrested by the NYPD’s 75th precinct, the most-sued precinct in NYC. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

There’s been a huge amount of restraint by the NYPD” -Mayor de Blasio, on the very obvious bias in policing of social distancing observed anecdotally but also in numbers released by the NYPD. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

After a week of violent arrests of minority New Yorkers and criticism of how differently the NYPD is handling overcrowding in parks, the mayor decided to limit the number of people allowed Hudson River and Domino Park. That fixes everything, right? (NY1)

Take a look at the latest filings for Pacific Park, the set of apartment buildings planned for the Atlantic Yards. (Norman Odler for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Edible Queens will close at the end of the month, after a three-year run. Each Edible publication is independently owned. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Allowing bars and restaurants to sell cocktails to go has been a lifeline to some bars, but to the bars in the city whose appeal is the community and not the cocktails, they continue to struggle. The damage of the ongoing closure is putting the city’s remaining lesbian bars in danger. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

While restaurants are fighting to survive, Grubhub is reporting record revenue. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Whenever the city’s restaurants are allowed to open back up, expect reduced capacity and new social distancing rules to be put in place. If you thought going back to restaurants and bars was going to be the “all clear” signal, we’ll still have a long road ahead. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The first death of a child due to the syndrome linked to Covid-19 was reported at the end of last week. On Friday, there were 73 children in the state hospitalized because of the syndrome. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

NYC’s reaction to JetBlue’s low-altitude flyover was a general “could you please not?” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Gray’s Papaya on the Upper West Side has reopened. It’s not 24 hours (yet), but it’s nice to have an NYC institution back. (Carol Tannenhauser for West Side Rag)

Revel has continued its expansion during the pandemic, reaching into the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Rent Guidelines Board (RGB) will vote on June 17 on adjustments for the city’s 1 million rent-stabilized apartments for the coming year. Your questions from “What is the RGB?” to “When does their decision go into effect” explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Tae Kyong Kim and Jung Soo Lee have been arrested and charged with price gouging for selling face masks for $45 a pack at Whitestone grocery store Raspberry Farm. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Welcome to 2020, where heroin is branded “Coronavirus.” Over a million dollars of Coronavirus heroin and fentanyl was seized in a University Heights bust. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Spike Lee’s short film New York New York is “A Love Letter To It’s People. Plain And Simple”. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Governor Andrew Cuomo extended the deadline for filing new childhood sexual abuse claims under New York’s Child Victims Act from August 14, 2020, to January 14, 2021. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

This weekend my wife found a place on Franklin Ave in Crown Heights that put itself online as an ice cream delivery store. It’s a corner store, but they found their angle to get themselves online. They’re not the only ones, in another example of finding your angle to get online, Annie’s Blue Ribbon General Store in Park Slope has 1,000 piece puzzles for those of you clamoring for new puzzles. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Ben Benson, whose career took him from helping create TGI Friday’s, to creating Smith and Woolensky, to eventually creating his own steakhouse, Ben Benson’s. (Kim Severson for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio put NYC Health + Hospitals in charge of the city’s Covid-19 testing and tracing programs instead of the Department of Mental Health and Mental Hygiene, a decision universally disliked by the City Council, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and health officials. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

This week’s streaming performances from the Metropolitan Opera. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Over the weekend, as temperatures dropped into the 30s, the MTA still closed the subways for disinfecting, and provided “bus shelters” for the homeless New Yorkers that were removed from the trains overnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Op-ed: Acting New York City Transit president Sarah Feinberg in her own words on the subway shutdown. (Sarah Feinberg for amNewYork Metro)

Video: In defense of liking New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Who the hell thought it was a good idea for the Lower East Side’s open streets to only be open from 8am to noon? Doesn’t anyone know it’s a pandemic? Time has no meaning anymore! We can sleep until whenever we want! (Bowery Boogie)

What do you miss about New York? How about everything. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

The dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)