The Briefly for December 27, 2019: The “Rudest City? I’ll Show You How Rude This City Can Get” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The electric bike bill is dead, the “gentrification tax” debate, meet State Assembly hopeful Emily Gallagher, the most beautiful restaurants of 2019 & more

Today – Low: 39˚ High: 52˚
Overcast throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚

It’s not the weekend without subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s lights never dim, but why? Turns out New York earned the nickname “The City That Never Sleeps.” (Derek M. Norman for NY Times)

New York City has a idling problem. Yes, idling trucks have been in issue for years, but one truck is nothing compared to cruise ships, which pump the city’s air full of 1,200 tons of toxic fumes every year. (Lisa M. Collins for NY Times)

New York City is the rudest city in America according to the dumb yokel idiots at Business Insider. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If 2019 was the year of the “pied-à-terre tax” debate, 2020 will be the year of the gentrification tax debate. Currently, homebuyers pay taxes based on the assessed value of the home, which is usually lower than the market value in gentrifying neighborhoods. The lead to change the law is being led by Republican City Councilmember Joe Borelli. Speaker Corey Johnson has said it’s “highly unlikely it will get fixed” this session. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We missed a white Christmas and it looks like we’ll miss a white New Year’s Eve as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What were the top restaurant standbys of the year for the staff of Eater? (Eater)

Don’t play on the ice in city parks. Two boys earned that lesson the hard way, but they were rescued by a friend. If you’re ever in this unfortunate circumstance, these are why there are rescue ladders all around. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Did you recently buy Egg White Salad and Old Fashioned Potato Salad from Trader Joe’s? There’s a recall. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

They’ve been mum on details, but the NYPD has located the third suspend in Tessa Majors’s stabbing. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

What’s in a nickname? What’s the origin of The Big Apple? (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Governor Cuomo wants to put a high-speed train system to connect New York City with upstate and is assemble a panel of engineers to review feasibility. For a low cost of $14 billion, the trains will go 77 mph instead of 51 mph. The current average speed of the subway is 17mph. Maybe we could use $14 billion to improve that instead. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The governor vetoed the electric bike and scooter bill that overwhelmingly passed the legislature in Albany. The legislature is out of session, so despite veto-proof majorities, it’s nearly impossible to override the veto. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Congratulations to the jackass who drove their car into the protected pedestrian lane of the Pulaski Bridge. (Greenpointers)

Mulchfest has begun! (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

Meet Greenpoint’s Emily Gallagher, an activist and primary challenger against the 77-year-old Joe Lentol who has been in the State Assembly since 1973. Gallagher is running on a progressive platform of environmental sustainability, housing justice, and transit improvement. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

The most beautiful restaurants of the year. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Briefly for September 20, 2019 – The “Today’s Global Climate Strike” Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, the NYPD gaslights bicyclist, community gardens protest de Blasio, AOC gets a challenge, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subways are “generally okay” according to the Subway Weekender blog. If you’re traveling to the edge of a subway line, you’re gonna want to double-check before you go. (Subway Weekender)

This is technically the last edition of The Briefly before summer comes to an end. The Times sent 20 photographers to 65 block parties across all five boroughs to beautifully capture something uniquely New York. (NY Times)

What you need to know about the global climate strike. (Patch)

Here’s how you can take part in today’s global climate strike. (Gothamist)

The city’s students are cleared to skip school today to attend climate protests, but teachers are forbidden because employee participation would violate the “politically neutral learning environment.” Congratulations to our idiot schools, who believe that science is somehow political. (NY Times)

Here are the 48 subway stations that will get elevator and escalator accessibility. (amNY)

Here’s some early information about the 2020 Tony Awards. (amNY)

Getting kicked off your bike is bad enough before the NYPD starts gaslighting you. (Gothamist)

Has Manhattan completely killed its antiques and art flea markets? (NY Times)

An accused Hezbollah member was arrested on terrorism-related charges in Ma nahttan Federal Court after scouting locations for a terrorist attack. (Patch)

The FDNY says that traffic, and not bike lanes, is to blame for increased response times. (Streetsblog)

Inside the redesigned Apple cube on Fifth Avenue. (Engadget)

A state ethics probe is still focused on the mayor’s 2015 fundraising. Three new settlements were reached with real estate developers who broke state rules with donations to de Blasio. (Politico)

Don’t snitch. Swipe. (amNY)

Community gardeners protested outside of City Hall, protesting the city’s new GreenThumb licensing agreement with the gardens across the city. (Patch)

Meet Badrun Khan, the Queens Democrat who plans on challenging Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Gothamist)

If you can’t make it to the “Storm Area 51” event out in the Nevada desert, alien-enthusiasts Blink-182 are holding a “Storm Brooklyn, They Can’t Stop Us All” at the Barclays Center. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The Insane Clown Posse are playing on a boat in New York’s waters in December. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The top five Upper West Side romantic movie locations. (I Love the Upper West Side)

President Donald Trump filed a lawsuit against Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance to prevent him from disclosing his personal and corporate tax returns. (Gothamist)

Shane Gillis, the Anthony Scaramucci of this season’s SNL, is proving what kind of asshole he is by getting on stage and said he’s been “reading every one of my death threats in an Asian accent.” Like I said. Asshole. (Gothamist)

Central Park’s $150 million upgrade will include a new ice rink and pool. (Time Out)

Video: Watch Casa Della Mozzarella make some of the best mozzarella in the country. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Watch what hanging out in New York was like in the ’50s and ’60s in an hour of never-before-seen footage as part of the New York Film Festival. (Gothamist)

What is roman-style ice cream? Find out at Caffè Panna in Gramercy, which is opening today. (Eater)

Grilled cheese, poutine, custard toast, and more comfort-food dishes to get you through these trying times. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

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