The Briefly for April 16, 2020 – The “Quarantine Cannibal of New York City” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The most books read under quarantine, Cuomo forces masks in grocery stores, the most expensive home in Brooklyn history, the status of your stimulus, & more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 49˚
Clear throughout the day.

It looks like we may have a plan to reopening the state. This week the state is starting with 2,000 finger prick antibody tests a day and asked the FDA to expedite tests for 100,000 New Yorkers a day. That really makes the city’s plan of producing 50,000 tests a week seem puny. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sometime you just wanna hear someone talk. Check out there oral histories of different NYC neighborhoods. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A guide to restaurants that are now selling groceries. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A conversation between historian Daniel Okrent and Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman about the art deco of Rockefeller Center. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The New York City quarantine cannibal allegedly killed and partially ate his father. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Are those free books on the sidewalk safe from germs? (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

What are New Yorkers reading in quarantine? According to the list of the most checked out books from the NYPL, it’s Becoming by Michelle Obama. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

At $20.3 million, it’s the most expensive home ever sold in Brooklyn. The view is pretty good. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

This morning, Mayor de Blasio expressed a desire in grocery stores to force shoppers to wear masks. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Flexing his muscle, Governor Cuomo made it happen, even if there is no fine for violating the order. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

President Cuomo? According to the betting markets, there’s a 3% chance. (Jordan Muller for Politico)

RIP Jimmy Webb, the longtime manager and buyer for the East Village’s Trash & Vaudeville. The cause of death was cancer. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The MTA initially asked for $3.7 billion to help keep the agency running, turns out the amount of money needed is actually closer to $12 billion. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’re a nurse, you shouldn’t have to sue your employer in order to get personal protective equipment in a pandemic, and yet here we are. The New York State Nurses Association is filing three lawsuits against the Montefiore Health System and Westchester Medical Center for not following guidance from the state’s health department. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

Where’s your stimulus payment? There’s a tool to check your status. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Pity Reverend Franklin Graham, who is “being harassed” by New Yorkers because he previously said that homosexuals will burn in the “flames of hell,” described Islam as “evil,” and railed against the “transgender lie.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

What’s worse than dog runs and playgrounds closed temporarily? How about no beaches open all summer? It’s a possibility. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

In what could be the worst economic crisis since the 70s, the city could be looking at 475,000 job losses and nearly $10 billion in lost revenue. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

An MIT study argues New York City’s public transit system was a “major disseminator” of novel coronavirus and the spread was made worse by decisions to cut service. The MTA disagrees. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s it like to fly into LaGuardia? Ever been the only person on a commercial flight? (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Kudos to Ponyboy, which is staying creative by pairing their bottled cocktails with labels from street artist Gazoo. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Thanks to reader @leecohen1 for today’s featured photo in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park.

The Briefly for February 4, 2020 – The “NYPD’s Very Not Nice 69 Million Dollar Cost” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The race to contain the coronavirus, Cuomo may use eminent domain to renovate Penn Station, the best new restaurants in Brooklyn and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Is this the year that Albany passes marijuana legalization or… oh god I just can’t keep doing this. It’s been over a year with this story and every stupid pun has already been made. Up in smoke. Gone in a puff. High time to blahblahblah. Bottom line, can Albany get it done? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

While the CDC is doing the testing for coronavirus, there is a team of scientists in New York racing to help contain the outbreak. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what we know about the coronavirus in New York so far. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

New York City medical labs can’t run their own diagnostic tests for the novel coronavirus only the CDC’s offices in Atlanta can run the tests and results take 36-48 hours. Mayor de Blasio is asking to change that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NYPD cost the city a very not nice nearly $69 million dollars in lawsuits in 2019. Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Reports of “subway surfing” increased in 2019, MTA figures show, though transit officials say the toll of those wild rides is likely even higher and deadlier than statistics indicate. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Things aren’t great for the real estate industry right now, but if you look at who’s running for mayor, things are looking worse. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Shaun Donovan, former Obama housing secretary and candidate for mayor, gets the NY Times treatment. (Aziz Paybarah for NY Times)

Are you one of the 1,128 New Yorkers that are in JR’s latest 53-foot mural in Domino Park? The mural is in conjunction with an exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, titled “JR: Chronicles.” Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Everything you need to know about steam heat. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

The history of how the New York Public Library got its start downtown. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Can art survive Long Island City’s gentrification? (Malique Morris for Queens Chronicle)

Just when the city was about to ban plastic bags, it seems that a loophole may allow stores to hand out plastic bags as long as they’re thicc. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

13 notable NYC projects designed by black architects. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

Take a tour of Michelle Williams’s Brooklyn real estate empire. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

As a part of Governor Cuomo’s plans to redevelop Penn Station, he’ll need to find a way to acquire two full city blocks between 30th and 32nd and between Seventh and Eight Avenues. He could end up using eminent domain to get the land. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A look at the Tenderloin neighborhood, before it was razed in 1904 to make way for the original Penn Station. (Ephemeral New York)

Speaking of Penn Station, Monday afternoon saw another commuting meltdown with only one tunnel for Amtrak and NJ Transit in operation crossing the Hudson. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 new public art installations not to miss in February. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The award for most radical stance goes to the “Students Speak Out: Cops Out of Our Schools and Subways” protest. The students in the protest are calling for the abolishment of the NYPD, a free subway system, and a fully funded and free CUNY system. (Amanda Salazar for Kings County Politics)

Williamsburg’s East River State Park will be renamed after the gay liberation movement leader Marsha P. Johnson, the first state park named in honor of an LGBTQ person. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Great Canoe in the American Museum of Natural History moved for the first time in 60 years, which was a split feat of engineering and spirituality. The canoe will be the centerpiece of a newly renovated Northwest Coast Hall in 2021. (Jennifer Vanasco for Gothamist)

Minerva Zanca, a principal in Queens, just cost the city over a million dollars for being a racist. She deliberately targeted black teachers and assistants with “racist insults and retaliation.” (Jay Connor for The Root)

PETA, who has always been on the right side of morals but displaying it in the most insufferable ways, put up a sign protest the Iditarod in Seward Park. Yes, protesting a dog sledding race in Alaska by installing a sign in front of the statue of Togo in Manhattan. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

We’ve been able to assume why, but we won’t know why Andy Byford resigned without seeing his resignation letter. Release the Byford letter, you cowards! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Baby Yoda mural at the top of the Second Ave F stop is no more, as “Gritty City Style” has taken over the wall. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD is working its hardest to create boogeymen to overturn recent bail reforms, including leaking cherry-picked stories and statistics to the press (mostly the Post and the Daily News, I’ve stopped including any stories from the Post and the Daily News’ paywall makes it difficult for me to link to regularly). Legal experts are urging caution whenever coming across an obviously sensationalized story and give the reforms a chance to work. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

80% of Bronx subway stations will have OMNY by the end of February. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Parks Department is closing a portion of the Riverside Park bike trail for two months between 110th and 125th Streets for repairs and are offering no detour for bike riders. Bike riders, as you might imagine, are pissed. (Julianne Cuba)

An updated hit list of the best new restaurants in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 29, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Subway Bandit, I Hate You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A dog is rescued from the FDR, the best restaurants in the West Village, the city’s oldest espresso machine, why recycling doesn’t work in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 26˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.

An interview with New York’s first ever Director of Cannabis Programs, Norman Birenbaum. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

In 2020 government agencies are competing for your attention on Twitter, and you know what that means: memes. How do you do fellow kids? (Luke Winkie for NY Times)

The amazing rescue of Daiki, a Shiba Inu who got loose on the FDR. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Do the N95 respirator masks people are wearing around the city work against the Coronavirus? The CDC says they’re unnecessary and they’re backordered almost everywhere, but they are the respirators that are recommended for medical workers who are exposed to the virus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There are many reasons to avoid taking the subways, but Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot says there’s no reason to avoid them due to Coronavirus fears. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Nightmare: A reason to avoid the subways. Whoever smeared peanut butter all over a subway pole this morning on the A train, I hate you. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Seven reasons recycling isn’t working in New York City. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Captain America is from the Lower East Side, or maybe he’s from Brooklyn? It depends if you read the comics or watch the movies. The people behind the Captain America statue in Brooklyn believe Steve Rogers is “just a kid from Brooklyn.” (Anne Ewbank for Atlas Obscura)

New York City’s best hotels for design lovers. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Central Park belongs to the coyotes now. Keep your distance. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos: Celebrating the Lunar New Year in Sunset Park. (Paul Frangipane for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

15 restaurants to help get you through the winter. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

A new public schools initiative reduced absenteeism improved graduation rates by bringing social services to campuses across New York City, according to a new study from the Rand Corporation. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Tributes to artist Jason Polan have been posted since his death, highlighting Polan’s love of humanity, his founding of the Taco Bell Drawing Club, and warm heart. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A tribute to the street art of the East Village. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

Light-up seesaws were installed in Midtown three weeks ago. This week, The New York Times is on it. (Aaron Readle for NY Times)

Whoops. Chipotle was fined $1.3 million for 13,253 child-labor violations across dozens of locations in the state. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The new City Winery location on Pier 57 is set to open later this year and the first show have been announced with Colin Hay, Sinead O’Connor, Vaness Carlton, Har Mar Superstar, and The Maintain Goats. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A search for the best pork bun in Flushing’s Chinatown. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

The city has chosen an NYC Ferry location for Staten Island, next door to the Staten Island Ferry that connects to lower Manhattan. The launch date for the ferry to connect to Midtown West should be announced by the summer. (NY1)

Amazon is expending its 855,000 square foot distribution center in West Shore, Staten Island, signing a lease on an adjacent 450,000 square foot warehouse. The new warehouse should be up and running by the summer. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A searchable database of the thousands of Catholic clergy who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse across the country was published Tuesday and includes hundreds of members of the dioceses and religious orders in the New York City area. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

There are three types of driver’s licenses. Standard, READ ID, and enhanced. Things are going start getting confusing on October 1, when you can’t board a flight with a standard license. Here’s what you need to know about the difference between the three types and how to get a REAL ID or an enhanced license. (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

Op-ed: New Yorkers didn’t flinch when the NYPD was revealed to have a DNA database of juveniles or were performing dangerous body scans on pregnant women, but the controversy surrounding facial recognition company Clearview was enough for people to take notice. Albert Fox Cahn and Lindsay Greyerbiehl make the case why more NYPD oversight is necessary. (Albert Fox Cahn and Lindsay Greyerbiehl from Surveillance Technology Oversight Project for The Independent)

It took Mayor de Blasio five years to let his feelings be known about Daniel Pantleo, whose choke hold lead to the death of Eric Garner, but NYPD officer Michael Valva, who is accused of beating his autistic son and leaving him to freeze to death in his car, he’s already commented that “this is someone who should burn in hell.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The NYPD’s Joseph Stokes and Jose Aracena are accused of stealing cash during an “integrity test” held by the department. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Photos: Meet the dogs and cats of the American Kennel Club’s Meet the Breeds event. (Keilin Huang for Untapped New York)

Cafe Reggio has the city’s oldest espresso machine. It’s so old (how old is it?) that it originally ran on coal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Department of Transportation announced the location of 10 miles of new protected bike lanes in Brooklyn, where 17 of last year’s 29 cyclists were killed by drivers last year. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

13 simple ways to make your apartment more green. (Lidia Ryan for 6sqft)

The 22 beset West Village restaurants to try. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)