The Briefly for December 28, 2018 – The “What the Hell Was That In the Sky? Was It Aliens?” Edition

This weekend’s subway outages and changes, the Astoria borealis, a record low number of homicides in Brooklyn, New Year’s Eve notes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All things considered the planned changes and outages on the subway this weekend are minimal. (6qsft)


Holy shit! Did you see the sky last night? (NY Post)

A transformer fire at a Con Edison substation in Astoria lit up the night sky around 9pm with a Independence Day style light show. (NY Times)

The (non) alien explosion caused a relatively small number of power outages, but the most significant was LaGuardia Airport. (Gothamist)

The explosion should remind us all about the city’s reliance on burning oil. Astoria and Long Island City have the highest rates of air pollution in the city thanks to the ConEd generating stations in each neighborhood which burn over six million gallons of oil a year combined. (HuffPost)


Which neighborhoods dominated NYC’s dining scene in 2018? (Eater)

A city Sanitation Department employee, Mervin Freeman, was arrested for allegedly strangling his 14-year-old daughter. The Sanitation Department is launching an investigation as Freeman denies the incident. (NY Post)

There’s an easier way to make a buck than to try to walk away with an ATM, but it didn’t stop these four guys in Prospect Heights. (NY Post)

Someone in East New York won $298.3 million on Wednesday night’s Powerball. Did you buy a ticket at Arnold’s Service Station on Linden Blvd? (NY Post)

What a year. Nine of the most improbable political transformations in 2018. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo stripped the State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli of the ability to review construction contracts for SUNY schools. Kinda weird for someone whose former top aide is going to prison for corruption. (NY Post)

The NYPD will file more serious charges against the homeless men who fought an officer in a subway station, including riot, obstructing a governmental administration, and attempted assault. (Gothamist)

The NIMBY’s at the West 58th Street Coalition, representing Billionaire’s Row, has successfully sued the city to grant a temporary injunction against the construction of a homeless shelter in the former Savoy Hotel. (NY Post)

When the MTA gets to define “good service,” the subways can easily run with “good service.” (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Winterfest won’t be back next year. Here’s a complete look behind the bedlam at the Brooklyn Museum. (The Bridge)

Who thought in the same year New York Magazine would write about Union Pool and The New York Times would be on the Output beat? The Times is soliciting stories about Output. (NY Times)

Manhattan’s Hudson Square has become so dangerous (how dangerous is it?) the city’s Transportation Department hired crossing guards for adults. (NY Times)

Brooklyn is headed to set a record with under 100 homicides in 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

On January 1, it will become illegal for pharmacies to sell cigarettes in the city. (amNY)

The updated list of the city’s hottest cocktail bars. (Eater)


Here are the New Year’s Eve street closures for Times Square. (Curbed)

Times Square isn’t the only fireworks in town on New Year’s Eve. Here are four alternatives. (Curbed)

Meet Tom Brennan, the man in charge of the most famous ball of crystal in the world. (NY Times)

It takes a full year of preparation to coordinate the dumping of 3,000 pounds of confetti. (NY Times)

Getting around the city on New Year’s Day won’t be simple. (amNY)

Astoria Borealis Reflection by Dustin Brown
Astoria Borealis Reflection by Dustin Brown

Thank you to Dustin Brown for the images of last night’s fire

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The Briefly for November 2, 2018 – The “Brooklyn Witches Are at it Again” Edition

A pumpkin-impalement record, a newspaper grows in Brooklyn, where to watch the marathon on Sunday, Harvey Weinstein is accused of assaulting a teenager, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway service doesn’t have any major outages, but it doesn’t mean that the random bits of train lines (No F between Church Ave and Coney Island, the G isn’t running north of Nassau Ave, the A running on the F between W 4th and Jay St) are closed or doing some weird stuff. (Subway Stats)

Construction on the L train will be tough on the East Village, but the MTA has made a few concessions like switching the lighting from diesel to electric, stopping construction at 10pm instead of 11, and installing air quality sensors. (Town & Village)

Hex Kavanaugh 2: Electric Boogaloo. (Catland)

The city will spend $2 million to renovate Selma’s House, an extension of the Louis Armstrong Museum in Corona. (Jackson Heights Post)

Q&A with State Senator Marty Golden. (Bklyner) Everyone hates Marty. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Governor Cuomo no showed the League of Women Voters debate, as expected. (NY Post)

Knife confiscations are up by 20% in the city’s schools. Yikes. (NY Post)

10 great places to eat vegan in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

Democrats added 158,000 new voters in the last six months, while Republicans added 1,435 new voters. Will this turn the tide on New York City’s sorry level of voter participation? (NY Post)

The 14 best burgers in the city. (Gothamist)

The best spots to watch Sunday’s NYC Marathon. (StreetEasy) Here’s the marathon route.

After Mayor de Blasio bungled the one year memorial for the West Side Highway terror attack, he’s blaming his staff for forgetting to read the names of the eight victims and forgetting to invite the victim’s loved ones until the last minute. (NY Post)

Is the city ready for college dorm style “co-living?” (6sqft)

What’s going to happen to Central Park’s famous new Mandarin Duck? It’ll be welcome to stay as long as it likes, but don’t feed it break or pretzels. (Gothamist)

The Art Students League of New York’s The Masters exhibit shows off 100 works from former students and teachers, including Norman Rockwell, Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Rothko, Ai Weiwei, and others.

A new pumpkin-impalement record was set by Jane Greengold! Stop by the corner of Kane Street and Strong Place in Cobble Hill to see all 224 impaled pumpkins while they rot. (Bedford + Bowery)

Harvey Weinstein was accused of sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl during what she believed to be a job meeting in 2002. (Gothamist)

The city has had a troublesome increase in anti-Semitic incidents as of late. The latest is swastikas spray painted on 72nd St. (Gothamist) The NYPD is still searching for the suspect who spray painted swastikas on a Brooklyn Heights garage. (Bklyner)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn. (Eater)

Who’s crazy enough to start a newspaper in 2018? Bklyner is.


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The Briefly for November 1, 2018 – The “We Need A New Bushwick We Ruined this One” Edition

Midtown is getting a makeover, Shakespeare in the Park goes dark in 2021, the city bungled their voting information mailer, the NYPD vs a swan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos from the Village Halloween parade. (amNY)

Here’s what you need to know about the election on November 6. (Brokelyn)

Is the closing of Bushwick art gallery Signal the canary in a coal mine for the decline of the neighborhood? Signal closes on November 2 after their final show, “No Signal.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Governor Cuomo restored voting rights to most parolees in April, but someone forgot to tell the city’s Board of Elections, who printed the wrong information in the City Voter Guide mailers. (Bklyner)

2 Penn Plaza is about to get a dramatic revamp starting in 2020. Get ready for midtown to look very different. (Curbed)

All 128 NYC restaurants that were awarded Bib Gourmand status in 2019 (two courses and a glass of wine or dessert is under $40). (Eater)

How many NYPD officers does it take to capture a swan? Watch the video and see. (Gothamist)

Get ready for tight security at the NYC Marathon this Sunday. (Queens Gazette)

The newest addition to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade’s balloons is “Little Cloud” from the art duo FriendsWithYou, a happy little optimistic cloud. (NY Times)

The creator of the MetroCard, William Wheeler, swiped his last swipe at 69. He worked for the MTA for 32 years and is one of the reasons we don’t still use tokens. (NY Post)

19 bars and restaurants in Astoria to try. (Eater)

Take a tour and dip into the history of of Red Hook’s Erie Basin. (Forgotten NY)

The new Greenpoint Library will not open in December as scheduled due to discoveries of asbestos and the remains of the original Carnegie Library from 1906. (Bklyner)

Check out every publicly accessible waterfront in the city with the interactive Waterfront Access Map. (Curbed)

Shakespeare in the Park will go dark in 2021 when the Delacourt undergoes a $110 million renovation. The renovation is meant to address issues like how the women’s bathroom is extremely far from the amphitheater, making it ADA compliant, and other needed improvements to the stage and backstage areas. Construction is set to being in 2020 and finish in 2022. (NY Times)

Alan Cumming is tending bar. “Why would you want to have a bar otherwise?”

The elevated trains in New York date back to 1868, when the Eiffel Tower was brand new. The trains moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus. (Curbed)

City Lab attended the L Train Shutdown Nightmare “experience” before it prematurely closed. They were less than impressed.

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