The Briefly for July 9, 2020 – The “They Don’t Call it a Subway Doomsday for Nothing” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s plan for schools in September, the worst place in NYC, wait times for Covid-19 test results slip, frozen boozy drinks, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 85˚
Humid throughout the day.

What’s the worst place in NYC? Seems there’s some consensus around Penn Station. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Despite what he may think, the president doesn’t actually have control over how the city’s schools operate. Mayor de Blasio’s plan, which is only a plan, is still subject to the state’s approval. Early August is the state’s deadline for approving or modifying the city’s plan. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s schools are facing $642 million in budget cuts. The city’s private schools received tens of millions of dollars from the federal government’s PPP program. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor announced his plan for school openings in the fall. His plans call for a partial reopening this September. Classroom attendance would be limited to one to three days a week. While it’s a burden for children, teachers, parents, the economy, and everyone involved, it’s a burden that is not worse than death, which is what his plan is hoping to prevent. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

A deeper dive into the options already presented for the city’s schools for in-person learning. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Here’s a terrifying map of what the city’s subways could look like if the MTA doesn’t get any federal assistance and uses the Riders Alliance 2010 “Doomsday on the MTA” report. To accommodate the loss in revenues, the MTA would have to cut the 1, 2, 3, 7, B, D, F, M, G, J, Z, and Franklin Avenue Shuttle. They don’t call it doomsday for nothing. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Things were already projected to be bad for the MTA, but for each tax dollar the city doesn’t collect, the MTA is pushed further and further into the economic abyss. The MTA’s projected tax revenue for 2021 will be $1.4 billion lower than expected. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The subways shut down for four hours a day and that may seem inconvenient, but a transit strike in 1966 shut the subways down for two weeks. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A Queens driver hit and killed 64-year-old Richard O’Flaherty in Far Rockaway on Tuesday. The driver was not charged. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Governors Island will reopen on July 15th for “passive recreation” from 10 am – 7 pm. You’ll need tickets in advance and they can be reserved beginning on Friday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: It used to be a school, now it’s a $22.5 million penthouse with four bedrooms, a two-level terrace, and a double-sided marble fireplace. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Why the hell is the NYPD protecting statues of Christopher Columbus across the city 24/7? (Gerch Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Someone driving an SUV drove through a crowd of protesters in Times Square, sending at least one to the hospital. The driver was taken into custody, but not arrested or charged. If the NYPD can do it with initial mayoral support and no consequences, what’s to stop a citizen from doing the same thing? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an “entirely new accountability structure” for the NYPD, including reducing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s role in overseeing the force. Under James’ recommendation, a commission of the City Council, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and the mayor would have control over the NYPD’s budget. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The development announced for the failed Amazon HQ2 site has hit a wall: City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Without Van Bramer’s support, the project’s needed rezoning can’t happen. Long Island City’s newly constructed apartments are 60% empty. This plan would bring an additional 2,700 apartments to the area. Van Bramer’s idea for the land is simple: it’s public land and should be used by the public. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

8 tips for negotiating your lease renewal in NYC. (Localize.City)

In an article about how graffiti is on the rise during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Times starts by saying the conditions are perfect for “a new generation of graffiti writers.” The Old Gray Lady indeed. (David Gonzalez for NY Times)

The city’s oldest gay bar, Julius’ Bar, launched a GoFundMe campaign to keep the bar and it employees afloat until indoor dining comes back, which may be a while. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The availability for Covid-19 testing has increased across the city, but the availability of labs to process those tests hasn’t risen to meet the demand. As a result, wait times for test results have slipped from the three-day range to upwards of a week. Is your result still relevant if it’s been a week since the test? (Elizabeth Kim and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Where to pick up food near Central Park. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The staff at Jack the Horse in Brooklyn Heights are accusing the owners of misusing thousands of dollars in donations intended for employees. The GoFundMe states (errors and all) “We still hoping to raise money to support our wonderful staff who are out of work due to COVID-19.” The owners paid food and alcohol vendors and insurance bills with the $15,000+ of donations to the GoFundMe. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A five-story building partially collapsed in Murray Hill on E 38th in Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. One person was injured and was brought to the hospital. (Ben Yakas and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

What’s your favorite pre-pandemic food? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A few NYC holy grail apartments: 2 bedrooms for under $2,000 a month. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

The story of how an Angela Davis quote ended up being displayed prominently towards the Barclays Center subway entrance. (Norman Oder for BKLYNER)

The Board of Elections in New York City turns Election Day into Groundhog Day—we see the same problematic deficiencies each cycle: despite a bipartisan cross-ideological desire to fix them, they reoccur like clockwork. The time has come to use the important expansion of vote-by-mail to finally fix these consistent problems.
– City Councilmember Carline Rivera, Voting by mail must be expanded to fix existing problems

Interactive Map: More than 13,000 Manhattan-based businesses secured loans of more than $150,000 from the federal government through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Major League Soccer announced the schedule for their summer tournament and NYCFC’s first game is today (Thursday) morning at 9 am. (Joe Pantorno for Bronx Times)

RIP Jane Walentas, the artist behind the three-decade restoration of Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

Twenty places across the city to enjoy nature. (Jenna Fanelli for Bronx Times)

The city will only retain 50 of its 95 park rangers, thanks to the city’s budget cuts. In a budget of $88.2 billion, the cuts to the park ranger program are saving $10 million, or 0.01% of the budget. (Reuven Blau for The City)

13 places to get frozen boozy drinks in Astoria. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 3, 2020 – The “Hey Kid, Want To Buy A Baseball Team?” July 4th Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: July 4th subway and bus schedules, the St. James Place dance parties, the NYPD refuses to hand over bodycam footage, where to hang out by the water, & more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 90˚
Rain in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 72˚ High: 87˚

The Briefly turns two years old today!

Here is the MTA’s July 4th weekend beach subway and bus schedule. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

On the night of July 4th, we’ll be able to see a buck moon and a lunar eclipse. Don’t be so impressed with the buck moon part, all that means is that it’s the first full moon in July. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

RIP Free Slurpee Day 2020. (Fanni Frankl for amNewYork Metro)

Want to buy the Mets? You have until July 9 to place your bid. Can we start a Go FundMe? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Eight tips for dining outside right now at NYC restaurants. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

More than 20 streets closed to cars citywide will now be dedicated to outdoor dining starting this weekend and lasting every weekend through Labor Day. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

The High Line will reopen on July 16 with a limited capacity. (NY1)

New York City families will be able to keep their children home this fall and opt for a full remote school schedule regardless of medical need. 25% of students surveyed said they were “very” comfortable returning to school. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Alternate side parking will be suspended from July 5 through the 12. The reason given is the pandemic and trying to keep people from making unnecessary trips. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNew York Metro)

Video: Exploring the origins of the St. James Place in Clinton Hill nightly 7 pm dance party. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New York is no longer on track to contain the coronavirus as infection numbers surge to record new highs across the country. At this rate, herd immunity is possible, but it will take years to set it. CT, MA, RI, and VT are on the list of states on the path to contain the virus. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

One of the big questions coming out of the pandemic is its effect on the city’s real estate and it looks like we’re starting to get hints of what’s to come. Median sales prices in Manhattan fell 17.7% compared to this time last year and the volume of sales dropped 54%. (Stefanos Chen and Sydney Franklin for NY Times)

Astoria’s Artopolis Bakery, Gussy’s Bar, and Monika’s Cafe-Bar are now among the 4% of the city’s restaurants and bars that have permanently closed since March. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Do NYC is attempting to compile a list of permanently closed bars and restaurants. (Do NYC)

By the time Governor Cuomo announced day camps could operate this summer and release safety guidelines for them, it was less than a month to their start date. Hundreds of applications for camps from the city rolled into Albany and there hasn’t been enough time for the Health Department to properly review them before being approved, so the summer started with over 225 camp applications sitting in limbo. (Reuven Blau for The City)

You can see the new exhibition Art on the Grid across the city on 500 bus shelters and 1,700 LinkNYC kiosks. The exhibit explores healing and loss, community and isolation, intimacy and solitude, and inclusivity and exclusivity. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times highlights the importance of the bike protests that have spring up around the city since Memorial Day weekend. (Troy Closson and Sean Piccoli for NY Times)

The Times, feeling optimistic, asks: Could New York finally become a bike city? (Sasha von Oldershausen for NY Times)

Photos: The city’s first day with open beaches. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Whitney Hu, a candidate looking to succeed Carlos Menchaca for City Council for District 38, the district at the center of the Industry City rezoning fight. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

The city will spend $80 million toward the reconstruction of 70 Mulberry St, which was destroyed by fire in January, including many items from the Museum of Chinese in America. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Looking to get married but don’t want to leave your car? Now you can get married in a drive-thru. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: Hundreds of people marched from Bay Ridge to the Barclays Center as a part of the international “Day of Rage” ªin opposition to Israel’s occupation and annexation of Palestine. (Meaghan McGoldrick, photos by Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A one-minute explanation of why some animals thrive in NYC and some flounder. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A first look at a proposed mixed-use development on the Astoria/Long Island City that will take up five blocks with twelve buildings that are being called “Innovation QNS,” which is an awful name. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

During the construction of a seawall to protect a train yard in Inwood from another Hurricane Sandy, the MTA unearthed a patrol torpedo boat from the Harlem River that was once commanded by John F. Kennedy. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

How many times have you ridden a subway to the end of a line? Exploring the end of the 2 line. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The problem with asking your employees for their feedback is that they know that you heard it. When WNYC’s newsroom was asked who should lead their daily news coverage them after the harassment and discrimination that plagued the newsroom was brought to light, the answer was clear: a person of color who understood New York, with experience in public radio. Their new boss? A white woman from California with no public radio experience. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

The state is rolling back some of its bail reforms, which took hold six months ago. More charges will be eligible for bail and more categories will be eligible for bail, which will result in more people being sent to jail, which has become an extremely dangerous place to be during the pandemic. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A Blue Lives Matter rally in the Bronx, as you might expect, quickly devolved into the participants screaming obscenities and threatening protesters. Yes, there is video. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says the City Council bowed to “mob rule” when it came to the city’s budget. Mayor de Blasio, never one to not put his foot in his mouth, defended Shea’s comments. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The NYPD has refused to hand over 1,137 requests for body camera footage, according to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which has made investigating complaints “untenable.” It’s this kind of bullshit response for the NYPD, who refuses to take accountability for their actions, that brought us to this moment, where the public’s trust in them has eroded and created the NYPD-led violence during the George Floyd protests. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Making the case for a subway stop in Harlem to be named after Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, who collected one of the world’s largest libraries of African American books, prints, and artifacts and whose collection became the basis for the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library’s Division of Negro Literature, History, and Prints. (Wilfredo Florentino for Streetsblog)

17 outdoor bars and restaurants to hang out at by the water. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 27, 2020 – The “Don’t Lean on the Subway Doors Today” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Brooklyn Flea revives the Chelsea Flea Market, Rafael Espinal quits City Council, $1,000 basement sleep pods, a library reording studio, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 45˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The real estate lobby is already calling for changes and exceptions to the city’s law reducing emissions 40% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. The law passed in May of 2019. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

New legislation could extend voting rights to Green Card holders and noncitizens with work authorization in municipal elections. There are 660,000 New Yorkers that hold Green Cards. 27 council members support the bill, but Corey Johnson hasn’t expressed support yet. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The R179 subway trains that were removed from service last month are back and safe, according to the MTA. The blame fell on the doors not being properly calibrated, but maybe don’t lean on the subway doors anymore. (Alejandra O-Connel-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Under the elevated tracks in Queens remains a dangerous place to be, as a bolt fell from the N/W tracks in Astoria, shattering a car’s sunroof. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

It hasn’t fully set in, but the reality of Train Daddy’s resignation is starting to wash over the city. Corey Johnson called his resignation a “crisis.” (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A list of Byford’s biggest achievements during his two years. (Jake Offenhartz and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Byford isn’t the only person leaving the MTA. Pete Tomlin is also resigning. Tomlin isn’t nearly as well known, but he’s an expert in signals and was the signals chief. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Fairway in Red Hook has been there since 2006, but its future is in doubt. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

An ode to the metal rat, this year’s lunar mascot. (Madeline Leung Coleman for Jezebel)

Three people in New York state have tested positive for Corona virus, and according to the mayor it’ll come to the city “sooner or later.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the Coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A Hershey Bar has a new meaning, as Hershey’s has opened a bar in the Barclays Center that serves alcoholic drinks made with Hershey’s, Reese’s, and Jolly Rancher products. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Did you know there is a recording studio in the central branch fo the Brooklyn Pubic Library? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Continuing from the Stonewall Democratic Club’s endorsement of Elizabeth Warren, Lambda Independent Democrats of Brooklyn endorsed Warren and Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club endorsed Bernie Sanders. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Chelsea Flea Market is making a return under new management. The Brooklyn Flea has a new lease for the parking lot location and will be inviting original vendors back for the same prices. As the Brooklyn Flea does, they have announced that they will also be inviting food vendors, but it will not be the focus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There’s a movement brewing to revoke the permits for the Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg event during July or August to give locals in Williamsburg unfettered use of East River State Park. There are no plans for that in 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Queens has a new speakeasy, the new Astoria’s Secret is hidden behind the facade of The Lingere Shoppe. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The real question about Byford’s departure. Will your commute get worse? Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

After using the term “yellow folks” to refer to Asians in an email, Manhattan Community Education Council 3 is calling for Brooklyn Community Education Council member Dr. Jackie Cody to resign. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Flushing’s (wet) Lunar New Year parade. (Jenna Gyimesi for NY City Lens)

A fire in Chinatown likely destroyed 85,000 items, some dating to the 19th century, from Museum of Chinese in America. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The Museum of Chinese in America is fundraising as they attempt to save what they can and rebuild. (Bowery Boogie)

An attempt at a definitive guide to New York’s Chinatowns. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

You think you pay to much in rent? Check out these $1,000 a month “sleeping pods” in a basement that are being proposed in San Francisco. (Katie Canales for Business Insider)

The NYPD is finally changing how it endorses the mayor’s electric bike ban. The focus will be on “unsafe” riding instead of ticketing and confiscating the bikes of food delivery workers, as their previous focused seemed to be. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

One thing missing from the coverage of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s moronic “go back to Ohio” comments was that the day prior to making them he was a guest at a banquet for the Real Estate Board of New York. It’s easier to make a villain of transplants instead of looking at the root problem of real estate developers who donate to your campaign for mayor and create the buildings that all these Ohioans and Iowans are moving living in. (Queens Crap)

20 standout Korean BBQ restaurants to try. (James Park for Eater)

Brooklyn Councilman Rafael Espinal quit City Council for a job with the Freelancer’s Union and the people working in his office found out about his new job via a tweet. There will be a special election for his seat in May, which represents Cypress Hills, Bushwick, Brownsville, Ocean Hill and East New York. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Spotted Pig’s staff was told to seek other work, and customers have been told that last weekend would be the restaurant’s last. It seems like the restaurant couldn’t wipe clean the stain of Ken Freidman or the things he allowed to happen inside its walls. (Eater)

You’re a reader of The Briefly, so this doesn’t apply to you, but for everyone else, where to take someone to eat who is cooler than you. (Bryan Kim and Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)