The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 4, 2020 – The “Batten Down the Hatches!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The reason for the spike in shootings, Open Restaurants will continue next year, how to stay safe on mass transit, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

President Trump and his company are being investigated for possible bank and insurance fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. (William K. Rashbaum and Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is once again open to visitors. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

The city is getting ready for a storm surge of 1-2 feet during Tuesday’s expected downpour from Tropical Storm Isaias. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Eataly’s new summer rooftop restaurant, opening on August 7. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

According to an NYC Hospitality Alliance survey, only 17.2% of restaurants and bars say they’re able to pay 50% or more of their rent. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

One-third of the city’s small businesses may close forever, according to a report from the Partnership for New York City with job losses already at 520,000. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New York state is extending its unemployment insurance past the 26-week limit through the end of the year. (East New York News)

All about rent increases. When can it happen, how much can it be, and how to check if your apartment is stabilized. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

The NYPD’s 26th Precinct has a Twitter problem. The precinct is in the heart of Harlem and their Twitter account has a history of hitting the like button on tweets about conspiracy theories, QAnon, and Trump. After being caught, the account removed the likes. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Evergreen headline for the moment: “The NYPD is investigating shootings.” (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The mayor has his own ideas, as does Commissioner Shea, but the data shows the reason for the city’s spike in shootings is a plummeting number of gun crime arrests. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

NYPD officer Richard Catapano was found dead in his Astoria apartment from an apparent suicide. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Enjoying Open Restaurants? They’ll be back next year, starting on June 1. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In addition to Open Restaurants returning next year, the city is making curbside dining permanent from June 1 to October 31. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: See the 193 new Rockefeller Center flags designed by the public. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Photos: 22 new libraries opened this week to offer grab-and-go service. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Maintenance workers and security guards at Columbia University will not be going on strike after TWO Local 241 reached an agreement with the university. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

The most expensive area to live in the city during the first half of the year was the 10014 zip code, covering the West Village and Greenwich Village will set you back a median price of $4.2 million. Tribeca’s 10013 was in second place at $3.1 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk through Prospect Park from dog beach to Parkside Avenue. (ActionKid)

A Walgreen grows in Brooklyn. (Greenpointers)

A basket intended to prevent debris from falling off of elevated subway tracks onto pedestrians… fell onto a pedestrian on Sunday. An NYC Transit Interim SVP calling it “a very unfortunate incident.” The person hit was taken to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

If the city’s schools open, what is the city’s plan to get all 150,000 students who rely on buses to school? “The DOE is recommending that families, wherever possible, help reduce the number of students in need of busing by either transporting their children to school on their own, walking, or biking,” aka “you’re on your own.” Got it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Video: Drone footage of all eight Black Lives Matter murals in NYC. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist, video from @mingomatic)

Despite the city’s plans to reopen the schools for the fall, Governor Cuomo has yet to make a decision to allow any school in the state to reopen. He’s expected to announce a decision this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Shootings jumped 177% in July compared to last year, according to the NYPD. Assaults and reported rapes declined year-over-year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Black Lives Matter mural walls in Gowanus were defaced with the tired response of “All Lives Matter.” This is the wall that was accidentally painted over once, so I have confidence that this will be fixed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos and Video: The red-tailed hawks of Governors Island. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Tips on how to stay safer on mass transit. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Photos: What the hell is going on with the splashes of blood outside this meat market in Astoria? (Give Me Astoria)

Can you think of a good reason that Williamsburg has more trash cans than Bed Stuy? No, seriously, it’s not a setup to a joke. “Bed Stuy Strong, Safe and Sanitary” wants your input. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Diana Florence, a candidate for Manhattan District Attorney and a former leader of the Construction Fraud Task Force within the DA’s office. She stepped down in January amid allegations that she withheld evidence. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Facebook signed its 730,000 square foot lease in the Farley Post Office building. When will it move in? That’s a whole other story. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

A judge weighed in on some disputed ballots in NY-12’s Democratic congressional primary allowing some invalidated votes to be counted, but not enough to sway the primary away from incumbent Carolyn Maloney towards challenger Suraj Patel. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

15 summery brunch options for takeout and delivery. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 19, 2020 – The “Phase Four Starts Monday” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A look at phase four, Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars, how to see the comet Neowise before it disappears, Metro-North has an awful new superhero & more

Hey! The Briefly is still a one-man hobby, and I overslept on Friday!

Phase four will start on Monday, but it’s been modified. Initially, phase four was supposed to include indoor venues, building on phase three’s indoor dining. No indoor activities are included in phase four. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The official list of what qualifies for phase four: Higher Education, Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools, Low-Risk Outdoor Arts & Entertainment, Low-Risk Indoor Arts & Entertainment, Media Production, Professional Sports Competitions With No Fans, and Malls. The indoor arts and entertainment is pertaining to museums and galleries and not seeing your favorite band play for a dozen people. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

New York City has public-drinking laws, of course, which include the regulation of open containers. Some New Yorkers have treated the city’s temporary takeout-cocktail laws as a cause for celebration, an opening of the streets. New Orleans meets Manhattan. But not me. While bars and restaurants reopen, the lines between which people get to enjoy these laws and which people do not are clearer than ever before. There are no alfresco dinner parties in the projects.
– Christian Rodriguez, Who Really Gets to Drink Outside in New York? for Eater

The rollout for Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars and restaurants was a bit shaky. There’s a new three-strike system, where noncompliance with to-go alcohol mandates or social distancing will earn an establishment up to three strikes before having its liquor license suspended, but also egregious violations could mean an immediate suspension. The new rules will mean that you’ll likely see a few small bullshit food items handed out alongside a to-go drink. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coverage of closing restaurants:

An ode to Odessa. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What to order from Angkor before it closes on August 1. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Hunky Dory is reopening, but without tipping. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Lilia is reopening for outdoor dining in Williamsburg and there’s already a multi-week wait. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Dirt Candy is back with takeout and outdoor dining. (Scott Lynch and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Smorgasburg is coming back too, with takeout only. Does takeout exist from an outdoor tent? (Erika Adams for Eater)

Grand Central Terminal’s food hall is open again. With no possible way to participate in outdoor dining at Grand Central, is it the only place in the city with indoor dining? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants that are open for outdoor dining. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bronx’s Little Italy on Arthur Avenue, aka “Piazza di Belmont” is taking over the street for most of the weekend over the summer. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The 9 best streets for outdoor dining in NYC this summer. Glad to see Arthur Ave is at the top of this list. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

How to see the comet Neowise in the city. You’ve got about a week to try to see it before it leaves for 6,000 years. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The mayor is calling for all 1,349 curfew protesters to face charges. Curfew violations are a Class B misdemeanor and punishable with up to a $500 fine and three months in jail. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One bad take deserves another. Here’s a bad take from Governor Cuomo, who opposes a billionaire’s tax because he says the ultra-rich will just leave New York. New York has 118 billionaires who increased their wealth by $77 billion over the four months of staying at home. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A review of Brooklyn Noosh on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn and it’s “secret garden” for outdoor dining with a recommendation for the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Wings. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

How to order takeout from Rao’s Italian food in East Harlem since landing one of the restaurant’s ten coveted tables is out of most of our grasp. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A fascinating question. Without food service jobs to subsidize their lives and art, what will happen to New York’s creative class? (Deepti Hajela for AP)

Metro-North now has its own extremely lame superhero. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The New York Botanical Garden is opening up on July 28. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in the West Village. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)