The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.

The Briefly for August 6, 2019 – The “Absolutely Unbelievable Story of A French Bulldog” Edition

The Union Square Tech Hub broke ground, the most rat-infested neighborhoods, a vigil turns into a mass shooting, a beaver in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Union Square Tech Hub, formerly the PC Richard & Son near Union Square, broke ground on Monday to cheers for new jobs and jeers that Union Square may soon resemble midtown. (amNY)

25,000 bees were removed from the Staten Island Ferry terminal in St. George. The NYPD’s beekeeping unit relocated the hive. If you come across thousands of bees, don’t spray them with anything and don’t call 311, call 911. (NY Times)

Meet Winston, a French bulldog who accidentally jumped off a six-story window, smashed through the sunroof of a car below and LIVED! Winston is staying at the vet for observation but has no broken bones. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio says Bernie Sanders would have won the 2016 election, does this embracing of Bernie mean the mayor is ready to stop spending his weekends in Iowa? (Politico)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a milestone 10,000 jobs for the first time in half a century. While it may never see it’s World War II peak of 70,000 jobs, they are expecting to see 20,000 by 2021. (amNY)

Driverless cars have arrived in NYC, but they’re only inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard as shuttles, operating in a one-mile loop to and from the ferry terminal for free. (NY Times)

Which neighborhoods are the coolest in the city? Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights, and the Upper West Side. Strictly speaking, in those neighborhoods, tree cover provides the most shade and absorbs the most heat, making them the “coolest.” (Curbed)

The best Greek restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

De Blasio steps in it again. The city purchased a cluster of buildings in April for $173 million, which appraisals showed a value between $50 million and $143 million. De Blasio owns two houses in the city and the mortgages on those homes come from the brother of one of the people who sold the city the overpriced buildings. Par for the course for our failing presidential candidate of a mayor. (Curbed)

The Dogspot “pet harbors” aka “dog jails” pilot program in Brooklyn passed City Council. These are the little locking windowed air-conditioned jail cells for dogs to sit in while you go into a store. It’s a step up from leaving your dog tied up and unattended like your best furry friend is a bike. (Bushwick Daily)

Meeting, James Turrell’s skyspace installation at MoMA PS1 is open after having its unobstructed view of the sky marred by construction at the buildings where 5Pointz was in Long Island City. (Gothamist)

For those of the spooky persuasion, Halloween is less than 100 days away. For those inside the haunted house industry, it’s already time to get to work. Take a look inside the construction of the Bane Haunted House in Chelsea. (amNY)

Eight crypts and catacombs in the city, some spooky, some scary, some tourist attractions. (Untapped Cities)

What do Prospect Heights and Central Harlem South have in common? They’re the two neighborhoods with the most rats per square mile in the city. (Patch)

How cold do you want your ice cream? How about “liquid nitrogen cold?” Four Winters, a new ice cream shop in Queens, is using liquid nitrogen to create “instant ice cream.” (NY Times)

It’s a midtown sidewalk showdown between a business improvement district and food cart owners. Food cart owners are accusing midtown developers are accusing the BID of intentionally putting flower planters and bike racks where their carts usually stand in an attempt to get rid of them. (amNY)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite where over one million New Yorkers have been buried since the Civil War, operated by the Department of Corrections and inmates are paid $1 per hour to bury bodies, is finally getting a post-Hurricane Sandy restoration. Erosion has caused the shoreline to disappear and as a result, human remains were exposed. (Curbed)

Add this to your list of travel nightmare scenarios. A woman was locked underneath a Peter Pan coach bus with the luggage on a bus bound for Boston. The police arrested the Peter Pan employee that allegedly locked her in. (amNY)

Part of the deal that allowed the Atlantic Yards to be developed was that 2,250 affordable apartments would be built by 2025. At the current rate of construction, developer Greenland Forest City Partners looks like it’ll be missing that deadline. (The City)

A beaver was spotted in the Hudson River, hanging out and doing beaver things. It’s been a while since the city’s seen wild beavers, but the beaver is the official state animal and the city was pretty much founded on the fur trade, but this little guy is safe from that. (Gothamist)

The lawsuit preventing 14th St from becoming a busway has already cost commuters an additional year’s worth of delays. (amNY)

A vigil in Crown Heights became a public mass shooting when four of the people holding the vigil were shot early Monday morning. All the victims are in stable condition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Agrilus 9895 is a new species of beetle discovered in Green-Wood Cemetery and is a relative of a species of beetle in Europe but unique to Brooklyn. (Atlas Obscura)

Where do food industry pros go when their shifts are over? A list of late-night locations. (amNY)

The Briefly for July 24, 2019 – The “You Can Beat This Bus in A Walking Race” Edition

A tale of two kinds of fare evasion, an alligator on Staten Island, the Queens Night Market in Manhattan, the Goop of pot, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer asked the MTA board to slow down their reorganizing plan, requesting that it be thoughtful, thorough, and transparent, three words that do not describe the MTA. (Streetsblog)

The Jet Ski Invasion seems to be just about as punk rock as the East River can get, and for two hours at the end of June, controlled chaos ruled the water. (NY Times)

Want to see the Department of Sanitation’s new trash bins being field-tested? If you’re near Castle Hill in the Bronx, you can keep a lookout for them. (Bronx Times)

The city’s slowest and least reliable bus is the M14A-SBS, at a blazing speed of 4.3 mph. This is the bus is feeling the effect of the petitions and legal arguments to turn 14th St into a busway. (amNY)

If you ask the CEO of the Emerald Media Group, someone who is trying to “make pot pretty” and appears to be trying position herself the Gweneth Paltrow of pot, about privilege and incarceration rates in NYC for people of color, you should expect a goopy answer. (Bushwick Daily)

Who will have the final say over the fate of the Industry City rezoning? Councilmember Carlos Menchaca. The community board will vote, which is purely advisory, the borough president will make a recommendation, but it’s only a recommendation. From there it goes to the City Planning Commission, which can approve, strike down, or make changes, and then it goes to the City Council, which will defer to the local councilmember for approval. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

More rain, more power outages. ConEd hadn’t fully restored power from its man-made power outage on Sunday before Monday’s storm knocked out thousands of more customers’ power. (Curbed)

One of the main issues that the city has been having with heavy rain is that the sewers and grates were not built with this kind of volume in mind. Monday night’s storm dumped over three inches of water, an amount we haven’t seen since 1996. If the grates are clogged, the streets can’t drain. That was the case on the Long Island Expressway near Utopia Parkway, and it would have stayed that way if not for Daphne Youree’s work to clear the grates herself. (Gothamist)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance announced last year that he would stop prosecuting subway fare evasion due to the racial bias that came along with the arrests and arrested dropped by 96%. Meanwhile, the Manhattan DA has prosecuted 100% of the people who were caught evading fares on buses, and those people happen to have disproportionately low income and are people of color. (Streetsblog)

If the New York Times is covering it, you know the trend already crested. The Gray Lady says traditional Irish sessions, a gathering where people perform traditional Irish music, are thriving. (NY Times)

If you’re received preferential rent, described as rent below the legal maximum allowed and accounts for about a quarter of all rent-stabilized apartments, your preferential rent is now your base rent and your rent increases are limited by the Rent Guideline Boards instead of your landlord’s whims. Anything above a 1.5% increase for a one-year lease (or 2.5% for a two year) is illegal. (Gothamist)

The weather-made and ConEd-made blackouts have been devastating to restaurants. It goes beyond the loss of business during the blackouts, like equipment damaged as a result of losing power, or food spoiled by a lack of power. (Eater)

The MTA hired a contractor to handle its homeless outreach in Penn Station and Grand Central Terminal. Is anyone surprised that the MTA’s pick, Bowery Residents Committee, was slacking on the jobs, reporting false data, and regularly ignored people asking for help? A report from the state’s comptroller audit shone a spotlight on the shameful performance. (amNY)

The recount rages on between Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and Public Defender Tiffany Cabán. Cabán’s campaign has spent over $70,000 on its attorneys, while Katz has spent a total of $0 because hers are being provided by the Queens Democratic Party. How does this seem remotely fair? Blame a loophole in the state’s election laws. (Gothamist)

Will the Queens Night Market retain its name when it opens an output in Manhattan? (Time Out)

Pity the real estate developer who might not “break-even” on their plan to build a 105,000 square foot underground gym at the Atlantic Yards. The plan was postponed by the site’s board of directors who are investigating why an environmental impact study was not conducted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

They won’t be able to legally drink for another six years, but Control the Sound is already playing bars and opening for Questlove. (Bedford + Bowery)

Okay, here are some answers about drinking alcohol on the city’s beaches. Here’s a hint: don’t make it obvious if you won’t want a fine. (amNY)

How to spend 10 hours in the Rockaways. (Brooklyn Based)

The 16th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets in 2019 was 17-year-old Alex Cordero on Castleton Ave on Staten Island. (Streetsblog)

The 17th cyclist killed by a driver was being withheld, but they were killed on McGuinness Blvd in Williamsburg. There were a total of 10 cyclists killed by drivers in 2018. (Gothamist)

An oral history of Margot Gayle, an author, city councilmember, activist, and preservationist. (GVSHP)

The Fraunces Tavern unveiled a new exhibition, celebrating the 300 years of history that the building has witnessed and been a part of/a>. (amNY)

Traffic news rarely makes it into The Briefly, but the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade will have multiple lanes shutdown overnight every night for the next month. (Brooklyn Paper)

The president is suing New York state for its recently passed law that would allow his tax returns to be made public. (Politico)

The Bronx Zoo will be bringing back its holiday light show now that LED technology will allow the Wildlife Conservation Society to run the show without violating its core mission of conservation. (amNY)

An alligator was found in the woods of Staten Island. How the hell did it get there? (SI Live)

It’s time to up your bar game, here are the best boat bars in the city. (6sqft)

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