The Briefly for October 6-8, 2020 – The “3 Guarantees: Death, Taxes, and Cuomo vs de Blasio” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Schools will close in 9 city zip codes but not non-essential businesses, Bushwig, Andy King is out, where to watch sports outdoors, and more

Today – Low: 59˚ High: 70˚
Clear throughout the day.

On Saturday night, Street Riders NYC organized a protest bike ride against police brutality in Manhattan. In a scene that we’ve seen too many times this year, an SUV drove into the prrotest, sending multiple people to the hospital. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Photos: Without the ability to put together their usual festival, Bushwig took over Maria Hernandez Park on Saturday afternoon. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Governor Cuomo announced that on Tuesday, he will close every school, childcare center, and pre-K site inside the nine zip codes with testing rates of Covid-19 positive above 3%. The schools will remain closed for at least two weeks. This affects about 82,000 students. The mayor wanted to wait until Wednesday but was overridden by the governor. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The closings may go beyond schools. This could spell the end of indoor dining in 20 zip codes, but for now, only schools will be closing in nine zip codes. Indoor dining is less than one week old. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If you have confusion about this, you’re not alone and there’s a good reason for that. Mayor de Blasio is acting as if he’s still going to close down non-essential businesses in the nine zip codes. To be specific, he does not have the authority to shut down businesses, only Governor Cuomo does and Cuomo is skeptical of de Blasio’s plans. Once again we are stuck between their pissing contest, getting pissed off and pissed on at the same time. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYPD issued a directive for its officers to wear masks, warning officers could face disciplinary action. You can report officers without masks to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, who will forward them to the police. It’s probably better for them to have a record of the complaints than the NYPD. (Ashley Southall and Michael Gold for NY Times)

The restaurant at Central Park’s Loeb Boathouse is closing and all 163 workers have been let go. It seems like if you wanted to recreate the scene from When Harry Met Sally, it’s another thing that Covid-19 has taken from you. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Maggie O’Neill, 61, of Murray Hill, Queens died and two men were badly injured after a seaplane crashed into an East River pier near the Throgs Neck Bridge on Sunday afternoon. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The colors of the terra-cotta mosaic subway station signs have meanings. Specifically, when they change has meaning. (Nicola Saraniero for Untapped New York)

This is why we can’t have nice things: Two karaoke bars in Flushing were shut down for violating Covid-19 restrictions with dozens of people inside each. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

What the hell is going on and why was this man dumping eels into Prospect Park Lake? (Jack Denton for Curbed)

Congrats to Amy O’Sullivan, a nurse at Wyckoff hospital, for landing on the Time 100 under “icons.” She treated the first COVID-19 patient at the hospital, who became the city’s first death in early March. (Katie Couric for Time)

A judge barred NYSC and Lucille Roberts from charging members dues after they were sued by the attorney general for charging customers during the pandemic. If your “home” gym is still closed, they are barred from charging you. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The City Council voted to expel Andy King over sexual harassment, finance, and discrimination violations. He’s the first councilmember to be removed in the history of the City Council. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Sentient ball of spiders and petroleum jelly Eric Trump was questioned under oath on Monday as part of a civil investigation by Attorney General Letitia James’s office into whether the Trump family’s real estate company committed fraud. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Radio Free Brooklyn will display a massive mural titled “Wall of Lies,” encompassing over 20,000 mistruths told by Donald Trump since he first took office. (Natalie Colarossi for Bushwick Daily)

Interview: Assemblymember-elect Emily Gallagher on assuming office in January after defeating incumbent Joe Lentol. (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

Where to watch sports outdoors. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Joe for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 22 – 24, 2020 – The “Anarchist Rat Cluster Jurisdiction” Tuesday Edition

Tuesday’s NYC news digest: The NYPD Chinese spy, RBG’s statue may have a home, the MTA’s bad day, indoor dining, some kids reutrn to school, and more

Today – Low: 59˚ High: 72˚
Clear throughout the day.

Everything known about outdoor dining, which kicks up again on September 30. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

It was a bad day for the MTA as an A train derailed inside the 14th St/8th Ave station as a result of “an act of vandalism” and the person responsible has reportedly been arrested. (Jen Chung and John Del Signore for Gothamist)

A 40-year-old man was fatally struck by a Manhattan-bound Q train during the evening rush hour on Monday at the Cortelyou Road Station in Flatbush. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

There were 295 subway windows smashed so far this year, which represents a 64% increase over last year. Reminds me of the Dumbo Car Window Smasher from a dozen years ago. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s been five years since Pizza Rat. Say hello to the rat cluster, a living nightmare for all to see. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

New York City is now an “anarchist jurisdiction” in the eyes of the federal government. As stupid as this new title is, it is setting the stage for a fight over federal funding for the city. (Monique Judge for The Root)

It wouldn’t be a story without a “Twitter responds to…” post about it. (Elyse Wanshel for HuffPost)

“The president can’t supersede the law and say ‘I’m going to make those funds basically discretionary funds,’ which is what he would have to do. He doesn’t control federal funding. Federal law controls federal funding.” –Governor Cuomo on the designation. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Brooklyn Bridge Park may be the home of Governor Cuomo’s planned statue honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

In a quote that he will eventually regret saying, Mayor de Blasio said “I feel very good about the trajectory we’re on” regarding the first day of schools being open to students. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

An interactive map showing which schools had recent Covid-19 cases. (Jake Dobkin, Clarisa Diaz for Gothamist)

46% of city students opted for remote learning, up from last week’s 42%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Congrats to Punkie Johnson, the first out Black lesbian member to join SNL. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s ban on plastic bags will be enforced starting on October 19. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photo Essay: Phil Buehler’s Bushwick: Art or Garbage. (Phil Buehler for Bushwick Daily)

Photo: Take a look at all the ways to cross the Brooklyn Bridge in 1903. (Ephemeral New York)

Photo: A subway tribute to RBG. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Are restaurant “space bubbles” a good idea or just another sad reality in 2020? (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Nearly 90% of NYC bars and restaurants were unable to pay full rent in August, with 34% unable to pay any rent at all. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The week’s most batshit-wild story is the story of an NYPD officer that is accused of spying on Tibetans for China. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

The DOE’s long-promised vow to make yeshivas violating state education requirements start teaching the subjects they’re supposed to is once again falling behind. This is one of the longest running stories of Mayor de Blasio’s failure to stand up for what is right in the city and it will continue to roll on. The city blew its deadline to produce a timeline for when state-mandated instruction would be in place and missed another deadline to finish meetings by June. This all started when he deliberately hid this failure from the public so he could convince Albany he was capable of running the city’s schools and he’ll run out the clock without doing literally anything about it. (Reuven Blau for The City)

State Attorney General Letitia James has stepped in and declared that her office will release body camera footage of police-involved deaths after previously leaving it up to local jurisdictions. This was spurred by the death of Daniel Prude in Rochester. (Sydney Periera for Gothamist)

A look at mayoral candidate and City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s affordable housing plan. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

The best outdoor date night spots in NYC, while it’s still warm enough for an outdoor date. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Apartment Porn: Inside the amenities in Long Island City’s Skyline Tower, like the pet spa and 75-foot pool. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A bike brisket tour of NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Reynard Loki for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)