The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 10, 2020 – The “Everyone Can Hear Your Phone Conversation” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city paints another Black Lives Matter mural, the zoos are reopening, Manhattanhenge, all public events are canceled until September 30, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 78˚
Heavy rain and humid throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

This weekend is your last chance to see Manhattanhenge this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Video: Looking to turn your apartment into an indoor garden oasis? Here are some tips and tricks to turn your black thumb green. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Predictably, Mayor de Blasio doesn’t like Attorney General James’ plan to move control of the NYPD under a commission. This might be the biggest endorsement to move forward with this plan. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

If you event needs a city-issued permit between now and September 30, it’s canceled. All events in the city are canceled, with exceptions for some street fairs, events in parks, and events smaller than one block. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

It used to be that NYC’s public spaces were where you could go to take a private phone call. The city’s indifference towards any individual person was an asset if you were in a restaurant or at work and needed to have a conversation, Now? Our public space has become more valuable than ever and in the comparative spareness of the streets, you can’t find the same level of anonymity. Now, when you’re on the phone while waiting outside a Trader Joe’s, not only can everyone hear you, they’ll make signs to inform you that your conversations aren’t private. (Judith Newman for NY Times)

Centre Street in Lower Manhattan has been co-named Black Lives Matter Boulevard. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The city painted a Black Lives Matter mural in front of Trump Tower, which is a nice gesture, but I worry that the city’s government has lost sight of their goals in pursuit of public art projects. (Michael Gold and Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Many New York City Council members of color say that in their communities people aren’t screaming for police defunding or abolition. One wonders, did they just close their windows each time a #BlackLivesMatter protest marched by their house? It is true that this year’s #BlackLivesMatter protests have engaged far more white people than they did when Eric Garner was killed, but in response to those protests the Council voted through a budget that added 1,300 new police officers. What Black or Latino Council member can honestly say their communities were screaming “Build new jails!“ when they approved billions to do just that in 2019? (None.)
-Andrew J. Padilla, Member of Community Board 11, for Gotham Gazette. Deconstructing the #DefundNYPD Clash with City Council Members of Color

Remember when the NYPD said that the spike in shootings was caused by the city’s bail reforms? Well, the data is out and the NYPD lied, again. Only one person released was re-arrested for a shooting. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The MTA is getting back to work in their offices, check out their guide to getting back to work. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Here’s what to expect when the Museum of the City of New York reopens later this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Congrats to the winners of the Time Out Time In Awards. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Restaurant Daniel, a Michelin-starred restaurant is jumping into outdoor dining, making it one of two starred restaurants still operating. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Photos: It’s been five years since the reopening of the High Bridge, which absolutely gorgeous, connects Manhattan to the Bronx, and is the city’s oldest surviving bridge. (Duane Bailey-Castro for Untapped New York)

In admiration of the city’s restaurants that have gotten creative with their outdoor dining setups. (Pete Wells and Karsten Moran for NY Times)

Photos: Michael Che has been hosting regular, outdoor, socially-distanced, pop-up comedy shows in Long Island City outside the Plaxall Gallery, working with The Creek and the Cave. The next show is July 15. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Lots of questions about masks, answered. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

No matter what the mayor says publicly, the Department of Education says it is too early for a plan to be in place for opening schools in the fall. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Take a look at the six finalists announced for the Brooklyn Bridge walkway redesign competition. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo, Prospect Park Zoo, Queens Zoo, and the New York Aquarium will reopen to members on July 20 and will open to the public on July 24. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Paulie Gee’s is offering takeout pies for the first time since 2014. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The Citi logo has been removed from One Court Square. (John Bolger for LIC Post)

After being temporarily released from prison, Michael Cohen is back behind bars and in custody to serve the rest of his sentence. (Maggie Haberman, William K. Rashbaum and Nicole Hong for NY Times)

No matter what safety precautions they’re taking, these rooftop pool parties in Long Island City don’t look safe. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Yes, some beaches are open, but some remain closed because the city has a shortage of lifeguards. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

How to always get your security deposit back. (Localize.City)

The Briefly for July 8, 2020 – The “Manhattan is the Actual Worst (at Socially Distancing)” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city begins counting absentee ballots, a 28 second NYC horror movie, assigning blame for gun violence, a look at PPP loans in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 84˚
Rain in the evening.

A complete NYC horror movie in only 28 seconds. (/u/NewYorkShenanigans)

Dog runs have reopened. (Angi Gonzalez for NY1)

Who’s the worst at socially distancing? We’re looking at you, Manhattan! (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The city’s absentee ballots, by the numbers. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Absentee ballots will begin to be counted in the Bronx, Queens, Manhattan, and Brooklyn today (Staten Island started their count on Monday), and everyone is getting ready to challenge votes like it’s the 2000 election and we’re in Florida. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

There is no official count of New York children who have lost a parent or caregiver to the virus — and even less idea of how the city will help support the likely hundreds or more kids who have suddenly suffered a life-altering loss. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

A look at the data of how the federal government’s Payroll Protection Program’s loans were distributed. The top three zip codes for loan approval were in Greenpoint, Park Slope, and Brooklyn Heights. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The International Culinary Center and the Institute of Culinary Education will be merging. Calling it a “merger” may be generous, the ICE has no plans of expansion and announced nothing when it comes to ICC’s faculty. The ICC is planning on closing its doors but will allow the current students to graduate before doing so. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Other cities may be bouncing back from the massive amount of people filing for unemployment, but in New York City unemployment is near 20%, forcing at least a million people out of work. With jobs tied to the city’s reopening and the city’s reopening tied to the country’s recovery, it doesn’t look like the city will be bouncing back soon. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

These are the measures that NYC courthouses will take to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Get used to seeing thermometers everywhere. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The mayor pledged 100 miles of Open Streets in May, and he is now touting that New York has the most Open Street mileage of any city in the country. That seems to have led the project to prioritize raw mileage over a holistic view of how people and communities want to use their streets or any sense of what conditions it takes for an Open Street site to be successful.
-Sasha Aickin for Streetsblog, ‘Open Streets’ Isn’t Working for All of the People

A Brooklyn man was indicted for allegedly smuggling hundreds of ancient Egyptian artifacts through JFK earlier this year. This is the second-worst Indiana Jones movie ever. (NBC News New York)

Summer school officially kicked off Monday, but some of the 143,000 students enrolled in the remote program have yet to start their coursework due to technical glitches. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer unveiled a plan to reopen the city’s schools, including smaller class sizes, mandatory masks for all teachers and students in second grade or higher, realigned scheduled for remote learning, restricted movement within schools, and more. The plan also calls for at least one full-time nurse at each school in the city. (Robert Pozarycki with Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The “37th Avenue Sidewalk Cafe Coalition” is calling on the city to simplify the permit process for sidewalk seating on a permanent basis. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights)

In an attempt to close the digital divide in low-income communities of color, the city will expand its “Internet Master Plan” over the next 18 months to 600,000 more New Yorkers. The cost is $157 million, with $87 million of it is coming from the NYPD’s budget. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Yankees and Mets will plan two exhibition games against each other on July 18 and 19. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Who wants to spend two billion dollars for a baseball team that loses $50 million a year? No seriously, who wants to buy the Mets? The Steve Cohen watch continues. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Speaking of losing money: Ruminating on if Uber’s purchase of Postmates deal is good for restaurants. One business that only loses money buying another that only loses money. What could go wrong? (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

How Black organizers fed the Occupy City Hall protests with restaurant and homemade meals. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The MTA is adding 9,000 more digital screens to subway stations to better inform people. Sorry, typo. I meant to sell more advertising. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The fledgling hawks in Tompkins Square Park are beginning to explore outside the park, but the family is doing extremely well. (Laura Goggin Photography)

When Lambda Lounge in Harlem opens this weekend, it will become only the second Black-owned LGBTQ+ bar in New York City. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

22 places Lin-Manuel Miranda left his mark in NYC. (Hannah Nice for StreetEasy)

Privately run child care centers in New York City can reopen as early as Monday, about three months after the coronavirus forced 3,000 programs to shut their doors. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

City Councilmember Rory Lancman, representing central Queens, is calling on Mayor de Blasio to fire NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea for blaming the recent surge in violent crime on criminal justice and police brutality reforms. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The mayor thinks that a majority of New Yorkers think more policing will mean that they’re safe. A recent Sienna poll points out that only 33% of New Yorkers said they feel “more secure” when they see a police officer. Who does the mayor think he represents? (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

“We have the knowledge to stop shootings; it’s unfortunate that most of our powers were taken away to stop the shootings. Knowledge is power? Well, we have the knowledge, we don’t have the power.” -Chief of Crime Control Strategies Michael LiPetri, committing a crime by murdering an idiom while looking to place blame anywhere but the NYPD for an uptick in shootings. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“Crime has been going up since 2018. This was before there were any reforms around bail or there was a release from Rikers Island.” Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance has his own theories. (NY1)

“We’ve had violence that we haven’t seen in many years and the police strategy is to reduce crime. In the past few days, we’ve been trying to reimagine policing, by listening to the community, set up meetings with community leaders and find out what they value, their cultures, and give the community the police service they desire.” Chief of Community Affairs Jeffrey Maddrey isn’t here to win, he’s here to make friends. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Touchy Blinky, a mobile interactive art/music/tech installation that is helping keep the East Village and the city weird. (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

Where to eat when it might randomly rain for twenty minutes. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!