The Briefly for January 17-18, 2021 – The “Micheal Scott in Times Square at Sbarro” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: MLK day in NYC, how to get vaccinated in NYC, meet the 38 mayoral candidates, Cuomo’s infrastructure projects, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 43˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

What’s open and closed on Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 18. (Matt Troutman for PAtch)

A list of NYC’s tributes to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

BAM is presenting The 35th Annual Brooklyn Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., which is free and virtual on Monday at 11 am. (BAM)

How to get the Coronavirus vaccine in NYC. (Ron Lieber)

Map: How New York state is doing with its vaccine rollout. (Hint: New York City has the lowest percentage of first doses administered. (Jen Chung and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

On Thursday afternoon a message was going online around that there would be vaccines administered on a first-come, first-served basis at the Brooklyn Army Terminal. This was called a hoax by some but there was truth to the message. Very quickly, the vaccination site was overwhelmed with people. Vaccination sites have the ability to administer “extra” vaccines at the end of the day if they are going to expire but the city isn’t looking for a Black Friday scenario every day at every vaccination site. I’d expect this policy to change as a result of these lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It seems impossible that there are “extra” doses of the vaccine lying around when tens of thousands of vaccination appointments are being canceled in New York due to the limited supply of the vaccine provided by the federal government. The state’s supply was cut from 300,000 per week to 250,000 per week with 100,000 being allocated to the city. (Joseph Goldstein and Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

There are over 30 people running for mayor in 2021. Here’s a quick rundown of them all. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Of the 38 candidates, Eric Adams and Scott Stringer have received the most cash support. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

It is decided that Andrew Yang will be this mayoral cycle’s punching bag. He’s not helping himself when the first question asked of him is “don’t you live in the Hudson Valley?” and the second question is now “don’t you know what a bodega is?” While it’s still early in his campaign, he’s making a few unforced communication errors that are not endearing him to the city as “one of our own.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

Real Estate Lust: This penthouse has so much outdoor space the first photo doesn’t even look real. $12.5 million, 3,500 square feet of outdoor space, and a dining room that can seat 30. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Satire: “My work seeks to interrogate the parameters by which we define and demarcate physical space, exploring the fertile liminal zone between the falsely binary notions of “indoors” and “outdoors” we too often take for granted.” –I Am The Designer Of This Restaurant’s Outdoor Seating Space, And This Is My Artist’s Statement (Simon Henriques for McSweeney’s)

Takeout in Greenpoint for under $10. (Katie White for Greenpointers)

On Tuesday night, the Empire State Building will beat like a heart, bathed in red light, as a part of Joe Biden’s Covid-19 memorial from 5:30 pm to 2 am. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

160 secrets about New York City, enough to impress some of your friends but bore the rest. For instance: Einstein’s eyeballs are stored in a safety deposit box in the city. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A look at ranked-choice voting ahead of the first election to use it in NYC, the February 2 City Council District 24 election. (Pia Koh for Queens County Politics)

Governor Cuomo is floating the idea of using rapid Covid testing to determine entry into live events. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

Four restaurants that recently started selling groceries. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A running list of restaurants that are temporarily closing this winter. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Governor Cuomo unveiled a $306 billion infrastructure plan that would replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal with a new state-of-the-art facility, reconstruct Penn Station and add at least eight new tracks along with 14 new buildings with retail space and up to 1,400 affordable apartments, a new waterfront park at Pier 76, and a $1.5 billion expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Center. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Atlas Obscura usually highlights mysteries or fascinations. There is no fascinating mystery quite like the Gowanus Canal. (Jessica Leigh Hester for Atlas Obscura)

The Times highlights the life and tireless work of Michael Evans, the project manager of the Moynihan Hall transformation. Evans took his own life seemingly due to the stress of the project only ten months before its completion. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The City jumps into NY AG Letitia James’s lawsuit against the city and NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan’s role as the architect of the aggressive and violent response to the city’s protests over the summer and his history of over-policing peaceful protests, directing cops to make unlawful arrests and allowing the use of excessive force going back 16 years. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The visuals of the MTA bus that fell off an overpass are amazing, especially considering no one died and only eight were injured. The bus was going 17-26 mph when it should have been going 3-4 mph. (Jen Chung and Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

More photos from the MTA of the bus incident and the media briefing. (Photographer Marc A. Hermann for MTA on Flickr)

For a laugh, the best pizza places in New Jersey. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Filming locations for Martin Scorsese & Fran Lebowitz’s “Pretend It’s a City.” I’m extremely jealous they got to walk in the Queens Museum’s Panorama of the City of New York. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Deanne Criswell, city’s Emergency Management Commissioner, is Joe Biden’s pick for the next head of FEMA. (NY1)

Kyrie Irving, Brooklyn Nets point guard and complete asshole, was fined $50,000 for breaking the NBA’s Covid-19 protocols. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The argument for Mets owner Steven Cohen to bring Coney Island’s original hot dog, Feltman’s, to Citi Field. (The Coney Island Blog)

The New York City Campaign Finance Board fined current City Councilmember Mathieu Eugene $10,717 for nine violations of campaign finance law, including failure to report transactions and making impermissible post-election expenditures. (Billy Richling for Bklyner)

Here’s wishing Congressmember, Adriano Espaillat, who represents parts of the Bronx and Manhattan, a speedy recovery after testing positive for Covid-19, likely contracting the virus during the attack on the Capitol and sheltering in place with Republicans who refused to wear masks. (Norwood News)

For the spooky set, part four of the GVSHP’s Cemeteries of the East Village. (Sam Moskowitz for GVSHP)

Where to eat when staying warm is a top priority. Restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Today’s featured photo is by Marc A. Hermann, courtesy of the MTA

The Briefly for January 10, 2020 – The “Governor Cuomo’s Art is a Nightmare” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The hottest lunch spots, MoMA and BAM get rival record store installations, the new hot bird, the BQX will not die, free Whoppers for the Bronx, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 48˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 42˚ High: 66˚

The MTA sent a cease and desist to an artist creating original subway maps on Etsy. His map is still available directly at his website. (Aaron Gordon for Vice)

The trains removed from the MTA’s subway fleet were removed over concerns that the doors would open while the trains were in motion. According to Bombadier, the manufacturer, “the doors had not been properly calibrated by a supplier.” This is all very reassuring. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The governor designed a poster and it’s a freakin’ nightmare. Cuomo himself supposedly had input on this monstrosity, and thank god he went into politics instead of art. Honestly it’s too unbelievable. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

A look at five city-focused proposals from Governor Cuomo’s State of the State address. (Bernadette de Vito for Kings County Politics)

>BAM’s Rudin Family Gallery is being , an installation that explores the significance of record shops and recording studios. The installation will include a working recording studio and record shop. Never Records opens at BAM on January 15. (Bill Pearing for Brooklyn Vegan)

Not to be outdone, MoMA is opening The Record Shop, in partnership with Earwax Records through March 1. There will be fine art prints, books, record players, and records that are a part of MoMA’s permanent collection for sale. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A look at William Pope.L’s “member: Pope.L, 1978-2001” exhibit at MoMA. Pope.l is likely best known for his “crawls,” like “The Great White Way: 22 Miles, 9 Years, 1 Street” where he wore a Superman costume and crawled up Broadway. (Martha Schwendener for NY Times)

Adelina’s in Greenpoint is making some major changes for the new year. Last year the restaurant converted to all vegetarian and vegan and this year they’re jettisoning their pizza fritter for pinsa Romana. (Greenpointers)

The TWA Hotel is trying their hardest to continue to make headlines. A swimming pool on the roof, an ice skating rink, a bar in an airplane, and now a “retro Alpine hideaway.” No doubt you’ll find your jet setting friend posting to Instagram from the new roof installation. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Gowanus is full of unexpected activities. Shuffleboard, ax throwing, street curling, rock climbing, and don’t forget 3D archery. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Fran Drescher is developing “The Nanny” for Broadway. No word on when Ms. Fine will make her Broadway debut. (NY1)

“We are evaluating all legal options against Bombardier, including the best way to recover costs incurred as a result of this matter.” -Andy Byford (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The No Pants Subway Ride is this Sunday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

Move over Mandarin Duck, the hottest bird in the city is now the Painted Bunting in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Birds! (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to have a vegetarian birthday dinner. (The Infatuation)

For those of us who don’t understand the appeal of Wegmans, a personal essay about warmth, enjoyment and Wegmans. (Nancy Davidoff Kelton for West View News)

Who would have guessed that CBS NY would win “worst headline of the week” over anything at the NY Post? This week CBS went with a long-debunked theory about how HIV is transmitted to stoke fear about the new bail reforms. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The BQX just will not die. The $2 billion project that would link Red Hook to Astoria has a new website which gives some information about public hearings and the timing of the project. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the MTA proposed removing bus service from a portion of Roosevelt Ave in Queens, City Council Member Costa Constantinides has proposed a reform to the MTA’s board, allowing for each borough to have its own representative appointed by the borough president instead of the four members appointed by the mayor. (Kristen Torres for Jackson Heights Post)

Mayor De Blasio put a panel together to help decide what should be done with the necessary BQE construction along the Brooklyn Promenade. Their recommendation? Create another panel. No solution, some recommendations to reduce traffic, but ultimately a draft release of the report says that this is a project that needs federal, state, and local input. Perhaps this will be discussed until the BQE literally crumbles. (Dana Rubensten for Politico)

FREE Williamsburg is ending its run this year, the 22nd year of its existence. They’ll be celebrating the end at Saint Vitus at the end of the month. (Robert Lanham for FREE Williamsburg)

Burger King is trying to make living near the Joker stairs in the Bronx a bit less painful with a promotion for a free Whopper if you live in the Bronx through Uber Eats. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Neir’s Tavern in Woodhaven has been open since 1829 (or 1855 depend on who you listen to). This Sunday is its last day, as the bar is closing for good after a battle with its landlord over rent, so head out to Woodhaven this weekend to raise a glass to one of the city’s oldest watering holes. (Kevin Walsh at Forgotten New York)

Is a surprise for no one, WeWork lease-signing is at a five year low. (Jack Sidders for Bloomberg)

Nothing is as Murray Hill as this White Claw Hard Seltzer display where a magazine rack used to be. (@heybonanos)

A former Brooklyn cop was sentenced Wednesday to one day in jail and four years of probation nearly a year after he claimed a suspect almost ran him and his partner over with a car—until a video surfaced months later that showed he lied. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Two Wheels, Soho Diner, the Deco, the Awkward Scone, Yafa Cafe join Eater’s list of the 14 hottest lunch spots in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 9, 2019 – The “Our Punching Bag Mayor” Edition

The weekend subway delays, the mayor’s potential ethics violations, the city’s new restaurants, David Chang reacts to Stephen Ross’ Trump fundraiser and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit seven different subway lines. If you’re planning on getting wherever you’re going via the subway, double-check. (Subway Weekender)

Looking for a beach read for the weekend? This piece in the Times about how Bill de Blasio went from a progressive hopeful to Democratic a laughing stock and punching bag is a good read. (NY Times Magazine)

It’s so common for businesses that close “for renovations” to never reopen that places like Boilermaker in the East Village are changing their signs to explicitly state they’ll be reopening. (EV Grieve)

During the trials for the members of the SPLC designated hate group The Proud Boys for their part in starting fights following a talk from founder Gavin McInnes in Manhattan, the members of the Proud Boys claim that it was the Antifa members that posed a threat and they were simply defending themselves. (NY Times)

8 places to staycation and vacation this summer. (amNY)

When the city put a freeze on the number of cars it allowed for ride-hailing apps, drivers claimed it was unfair because of the price of leasing one of the licensed cars. Now the Taxi & Limousine Commission is investigating those leases. (Patch)

Is this the best egg salad sandwich in New York City? Gothamist believes they’ve found it at Bibble and Sip. (Gothamist)

Michael Collopy was hit and killed by a cyclist on the corner of 23rd and 6th earlier this week, the second pedestrian to be killed by a cyclist in 2019. 23rd and 6th is particularly dangerous, a cyclist was killed at the intersection in June and there have been multiple crashes in the last five years there. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross, president of the company that owns Equinox, Blink Fitness, SoulCycle, and PURE Yoga and an investor in multiple popular restaurants is hosting a $100k/plate fundraiser for the president’s re-election campaign, “strongly disagrees” with the president, but it’s not stopping him from hosting the fundraiser anyway. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross was “the only potential investor” in David Chang’s Momofuku. Chang asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser on his podcast but didn’t mention if he actually asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser personally or if he decided that mentioning it on his podcast would absolve him of the situation. (Eater)

Chang isn’t the only chef doing damage control after his connection to Stephen Ross became public. Christina Tosi of Milk took investment from Ross and José Andrés opened multiple restaurants in the Hudson Yards, where Ross is his landlord. Both have issued statements to publicly distance themselves from Ross, but have not made a statement about what they intend to do moving forward. (Grub Street)

BAM commissioned Leo Villareal, Teresita Fernández and Hank Willis Thomas to create public art for its Fort Greene campus, to be completed in the next two years. (6sqft)

Photos from inside the Paley Center’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be alarmed, but a venomous snake may have gotten loose from the Bronx Zoo and no one knows where it is. Not as much fun as the loose cobra from a few years ago, some signs have been posted to keep your eyes open for a “nervous” black and yellow mangrove snake. (Gothamist)

Okay, let’s talk about the summer of White Claw. (Grub Street)

If you’re the kind of person who loves awful experiences, you can watch this 41-minute 43-second interview between Sean Hannity and Bill de Blasio. (Gothamist)

Each generation of commerce ruins the previous generation’s pillars and tenets and the slow and public death of the Sex and the City-type shopping experiences are no different. Even in this piece in the Times which bemoans when shopping “felt like art,” Ginia Bellafante admits that the stores she looks back on fondly are the same stores that signaled “the beginning of SoHo’s end.” (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio has taken his local ethics-violating campaign financing to his failing presidential bid, or as Susan Lerner of Common Cause New York describes him, “a walking ethical disaster.” (Gothamist)

The MTA’s fare hikes won’t help address financial woes, due to the fare hikes outpacing increases in income for poorer New Yorkers. If fares continue to go up, but not wages, mass transit becomes less of an option for the people who need it most. (Patch)

Even hawks need some privacy while destroying a pigeon on the sidewalk. (Gothamist)

Traffic at LaGuardia was so bad last night that the nearby highways and internal roads were full of people abandoning their rides in buses, cabs, and cars to walk in an attempt to catch their flights. (Gothamist)

New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza is popular with parents amid calls for his firing, a new survey shows. Carranza has been accused of sowing racial division due to his push for racial integration of the city’s school. (Patch)

19 new restaurants in NYC. (Eater)