The Briefly for February 16, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Bandit Needs to Be Caught” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Bernie Sanders gets the Bill de Blasio kiss of death, the cutest thing in the city, a 500% rent increase in Coney Island, the Amazon killer, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

What’s open and what’s closed on President’s Day. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Bernie Sanders campaign received the presidential kiss of death over the weekend: Bill de Blasio’s endorsement. De Blasio was, no doubt, looking for any excuse to leave NYC and jumped at the opportunity. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The subway is ubiquitious in the city, but at some point it needed to be built. The latest photo exhibition at the New York Transit Museum shows how the subway was built. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: For only $45 million, you can live like a Russian oligarch in the Plaza. The apartment used to be two separate apartments that were combined into one insane apartment covered in onyx and crystal. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Someone needs to stop the Peanut Butter Bandit. The worst person in the city hit the A train once more with the gooey atrocity on the poles of the train early Friday morning. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

He helped kill the Amazon HQ2 deal, and now he’s set his sights on making sure nothing like the Amazon deal ever happens again. Michael Gianaris wants to reform how the city gives tax breaks to giant companies. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s like a normal store, but it only sells flutes. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

JFK’s Terminal 4 will be getting a $3.8 billion makeover. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s 3:30 am on a Wednesday and you desperately want pierogis, where will you go? Behind the scenes at Veselka, the Ukrainian restaurant that’s been part of the East Village since the 50s. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Despite early reporting, Governor Cuomo and President Trump’s meeting about the ban on New Yorkers from the Truster Traveler Program and giving the government access to New York’s DMV records was “productive,” but no solution was reached. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Caroline Baumann didn’t resign as director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum out of nowhere, she was forced out after an investigation into her wedding found she violated policy when it came to acquiring her dress and venue. The Smithsonian isn’t run by the government, but is partially funded by the government and has a similar conflict of interest policy. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The ax is finally falling, all Barney’s stores will close at the end of the month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Only three restaurants in the city were closed last week by the Department of Health, but one of them is the city’s newest member of the 100+ point violation club. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The NYC condoms have a new wrapper, but here’s something that’s a little confusing: The name of the wrapper design is the “NYC Legend XL.” While it sounds like this is the magnum of free condoms, there’s no indication if this is for your average or not-so-average New Yorker (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man shot in the face by an ICE agent last week plans to sue the agency and is calling for an investigation of the incident. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Should the subway be free? According to City Councilmember Mark Treyger, the answer is yes. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Black Lives Matter President Anthony Beckford is the latest to stand up in support City Councimember Mark Treyger’s call to make transit free to use. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

He’s not alone. Meet the state’s assemblymember hopefuls who agree the fairest fare is no fare at all. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Meet Pancakes, the Staten Island Zoo’s brand newborn sloth, the cutest thing in the city. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The NYPD reportedly issued a subpoena to Twitter requesting access to the account of NY Post police bureau chief Tina Moore, citing the Patriot Act as their justification to try to find leaks within the department. The effort was lead by new police commissioner Dermot Shea. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s like a grocery store, but it’s an art installation where everything is made from plastic bags. The Plastic Bag Store, from Robin Frohardt, will be viewable in Times Square on March 1, coinciding with the state’s plastic bag ban. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A 14-year-old boy suspected of fatally stabbing a Tessa Majors to death in a Morningside Park robbery last December has been indicted on murder charges. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Rent increases are a part of life in the city, but a 500% rent increase is reprehensible. The Lola Star Gift Shop on the boardwalk in Coney Island faces a 500% increase in her rent from Luna Park and the company’s owner’s Zamperla. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

22 trendy restaurants you can still get into. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 1, 2019 – The “You Can’t Stop the Christmas Juggernaut” Edition

The weekend subway disruptions, everything about the 2019 NYC Marathon, MLB and Nike are screwing the Bronx, photos from Halloween, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend the clocks turn back an hour. Make sure to remember that on Sunday when looking at all your non-internet connected devices.

Getting around this weekend will continue to be tricky with the 3, 4, 6, 7, D, E, F, N, and R all with diversions. Maybe it’s best to follow the lead of the marathon and run where you need to go. Check the subways before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Time Out)

Use this custom marathon subway map to find your way around the city on Sunday. (6sqft)

10 fun things to look for along the NYC Marathon route. (Untapped New York)

The best places to watch the marathon. (NY Times)

The corpse of Halloween isn’t even cool yet and the Winter Village at Bryant Park is officially open. (Time Out)

12 new public art installations to see in November. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: West 69th St is a nice block that is very into Halloween. (Gothamist)

These political pumpkins spell out a simple message in the Village. (The Villager)

The story of how a sewing machine repair shop in the garment district run by a man with a penchant for collecting has become a trove of forgotten treasures and how he fights back the tourists that have no idea what his shop does. (NY Times)

There aren’t enough apartments in NYC. While that statement seems like the ramblings of a lunatic, it’s true according to “The Geography of Jobs” report, which shows that the city needs more housing to keep up with its explosive job growth. As a result, housing stock is increasing in Connecticut and New Jersey and more people are commuting. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball and Nike are working together to screw the Bronx. After city taxpayers paid $1.2 billion for Yankee Stadium, MLB and Nike cut a deal that only allows officially licensed MLB merchandise to be sold at “premium distribution points” near a stadium, which would freeze out nearly every business near Yankee Stadium from selling anything MLB-related. The Yankees’ COO has been working with MLB to resolve the issue, but as it stands right now eight businesses may find themselves up River Ave without a paddle. (amNewYork)

publicly said “something doesn’t fit” when it comes to Epstein’s death, stoking the interest of a million YouTube conspiracy theorists. (Politico)

It only took the mayor a day to roll back the heavily supported news that sidewalks on Fifth Ave would be expanded to make way for holiday window onlookers, saying that he hadn’t signed off on the idea yet. (amNewYork)

RIP Barneys. Sold for $270 million in bankruptcy court. (The Real Deal)

This is not how you play Untitled Goose Game. It is, however, how you capture a goose named Calista in Central Park with lead toxicity. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The city’s foie gras ban is, of course, going to be challenged in court. (Grub Street)

Say hello to New York, and the world’s, richest billionaires. (Patch)

Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl is leaving his job with coincidental timing after the Mother Frances Cabrini statue embarrassment. (Patch)

New data shows the NYPD rarely ever does anything with the honesty findings from the Civilian Complaint Review Board. 61 False Official Statement findings, which determine that an officer lied to investigators, were submitted and only five were substantiated. Another good reason to vote yes on question 2 in this year’s election. You can vote early through Sunday. (Gothamist)

Is a Wegmans a Wegmans without a Sub Shop? No serious, I don’t know the answer because I’m not someone who is insane for Wegmans. (Grub Street)

Take the stairs. More than 1,000 New York City elevators still need new inspections after faulty contractors gave them sub-par checks. (Patch)

The Times, always a few steps behind, has descended down the story of the Joker stairs between Shakespeare and Jerome Avenues. (NY Times)

10 raw bar picks. (Grub Street)

thanks to reader Mary for today’s fetured image!

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)