The Briefly for July 24, 2020 – The “Fight For Your Right To Party Or Not?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: New York’s rent relief program, the 2020 blue wave headed for Albany, the NYPD fight against disclosure, where to eat in LIC, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 76˚ High: 90˚

Here’s a combination of words you wouldn’t expect to describe New York City: “humid subtropical climate zone.” Welcome to the era of the sultry night in New York City. (Lisa M Collins for NY Times)

The details about applying for Covid-19 rent relief. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

With the program being called “an endless pit of despair,” the rollout of the program has been anything but smooth, with technical problems plaguing literally every step of the way. The deadline closes for applications on July 30. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Videos: Watch purple lightning hit NYC, including the Statue of Liberty. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Because life isn’t hard enough for the owners of bars right now, the State Liquor Authority is demanding that bars must provide a “sit-down experience” with enough food to be shared by a small group and food must be ordered with the first round. Listen, let me drink my beer and leave me alone with this. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ellen’s Stardust Diner on W 51st may be shutting down due to $618,459.22 in unpaid rent. In a confusing move, the landlords have put up a notice that they will assume possession of the property by August 7, despite the eviction moratorium in place through August 20. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A federal judge temporarily blocked the de Blasio administration’s plan to disclose tens of thousands of newly available police disciplinary records. Police unions argued that the public should not see “unsubstantiated” claims, while the rest of us argue that being able to see how many claims are listed as unsubstantiated is a part of seeing how the NYPD holds itself accountable. The NYCLU has some of the records, which they obtained with a FOIL request, but have been ordered not to release them. (Christopher Robbins and George Joseph for Gothamist)

The City, Gothamist/WNYC, ProPublica, and The Marshall Project want to hear about your experiences with the NYPD to help hold the NYPD accountable. (Terry Parris Jr for The City)

20 restaurants with takeout windows and seat-yourself tables. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The story of U Thant Island, the city’s smallest island. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Councilman Ritchie Torres declared himself the winner in the NY-15 Democratic Congressional primary. The results aren’t official, but it doesn’t look likely he’ll lose. If elected, he’ll be one of the first two Black openly LGBTQ members of Congress, along with Mondaire Jones from NY-17. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Jabari Brisport declared victory in Brooklyn’s 25th Senate District Democratic primary over Assemblywoman Tremaine Wright. If elected (and there’s a pretty darn good chance of that in the general election), Brisport will become the first openly gay person of color in the State Senate. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

How Brooklyn Assembly insurgents rode absentee ballots to upset incumbents in this year’s even more blue wave. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Results for Covid-19 test conducted by the city have been dramatically cut down to two days and the city’s “Test + Trace” program found and isolated 2,000 people with coronavirus symptoms. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The driver of a pickup truck drove into an outdoor dining area in Sunset Park, sending three people to the hospital with minor injuries. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Robert Sietsema’s 10 favorite pandemic takeout dishes. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

In a message to the youths, Governor Cuomo said that while he respects your right to party, “ThIs Is NoT tHe TiMe To FiGhT FoR YoUr RiGhT tO pArTy” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“The severe hailstorm was well-forecasted. Policing systems have forever been weaponized against minority groups to galvanize white supremacist agendas. To attack systemic racism is to acknowledge history and our own ignorance of it: Black lives have suffered injustice since the inception of our country. The change we bled for yesterday is the change we die for today.”
-Michela Wang, a student at Newark Academy, “This Is Not New”: Thoughts On Protests From NYC Teens for Gothamist

If you’ve got $88 million to spare, you can buy Jeffrey Epstein’s Upper East Side mansion. If you’ve got an additional $2 million, you should invest in enough bleach to clean the house. (6sqft)

What’s a carriage house? An explanation on the short, but wide homes with large interior spaces you may see dotted around the city. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Attention America: Costco still does not trust you with sheet cakes. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Congrats to Brett Gardener for becoming the 18th player in history to appear in 1,500 career games with the Yankees. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“The gathering there got smaller and smaller, was less and less about protests. More and more, it became an area where homeless folks are gathering,” said the mayor, defending the dismantling of Abolition Park while simultaneously erasing the city’s homeless population’s participation in protests. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Citing an “alarming lack of direction” in the city’s plans for reopening school buildings, a Sept. 10 start date seems increasingly difficult to achieve, according to a letter sent by the head of the union that represents school administrators this week. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The State Senate passed a bill that would mandate the 24/7 operation of the city’s subways unless a state of emergency is in effect, finally giving us an answer if 24/7 would ever come back. Next stop: The Assembly. (Devin Gannon for 6qft)

The pandemic has hit the city’s arts organizations to the tune of $550 million, according to NYC’s Department of Cultural Affairs, SMU DataArts, and Americans for Arts. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

More than a dozen New York City Councilmembers are already asking for Albany’s support in canceling state math and reading tests for third-to-eighth graders this upcoming school year. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The federal government will allow New Yorkers back into trusted traveler programs after federal lawyers admitted that Homeland Security officials made false statements in a bid to justify expelling New York residents from programs that let United States travelers speed through borders and airport lines. Another lie from the Trump administration. (Ed Shanahan with Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

MLB is expanding its postseason to 16 teams, giving four third-place teams a spot in the playoffs. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Tenement Museum laid off 76 part-time workers. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

A look at the Billion Oyster Project’s latest effort, shipping containers turned oyster farms using discarded shells from restaurants, to restore 100 million oysters into the New York Harbor a year. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

How will baseball games deal with rain delays in a shortened season? If it starts raining, the game’s over. The Yankees won a five-inning game last night to kick off their 2020 season. (NY1)

City Council Member Brad Lander is calling on the city to close streets to use them for outdoor instruction for the city’s schools. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

The Times used the right word when describing the exodus of tourists from the city: “flushed.” Will they come back? (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Long Island City. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Stacy for today’s featured photo from the Elizabeth Street Garden.

The Briefly for July 20, 2020 – The “A Hot, Gross, and Dirty Week” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The confusion around phase four, Jimmy Webb’s I Need More is closing, Steinway Street is punished, where to eat outside in Red Hook, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 91˚
Humid and partly cloudy throughout the day.

Weather warning for this week: It’s gonna be hot, gross, and dirty. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Remember all those museums that announced plans to open with phase four? Governor Cuomo has removed museums and malls from the plans. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

With indoor dining happening… maybe never? The mayor has extended outdoor dining through October. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Who among us hasn’t >asked Citi Bike to move a bike rack so your favorite restaurant in Greenwich Village can have outdoor seating during a pandemic, (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Of course, they could try what Deux Amis did in Midtown, which is building their outdoor seating on top of the Citi Bike docks. They’ve already been issued a cease and desist. (Gresh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The City Council wants the mayor to create a clearer universal set of standards when it comes to setting and enforcing outdoor dining regulations. “Welcome to the party.” -Restaurant and bar owners. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Videos: The epicenter of stupidity in Queens has become Steinway Street, “The Party Street of Queens.” (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

It didn’t take long until Steinway Street was removed from the city’s Open Streets program. (Sydney Pereira and Scott Heins for Gothamist)

If you missed Sunday’s email, Governor Cuomo has not banned to-go cocktails. Bars will have to give you some kind of bullshit mandatory snacks with your drinks. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Tyrese Haspil has been charged with the murder of Fahim Saleh, the CEO murdered and dismembered in the Lower East Side. (William K. Rashbaum, Alan Feuer and Michael Gold for NY Times)

The history of how Grand Central Terminal became the first railroad station in the US to adopt standard time. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Matt Damon, welcome to Brooklyn. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

Think you were in Brooklyn before it was cool? The Brooklyn Historical Society released nearly 1,500 maps of Brooklyn dating back to 1562. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

13 hidden patios, backyards and gardens for outdoor dining in NYC. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Photos: Inside the newly renovated Starvos Niarchos Foundation Library after a $200 million renovation. It’s the only free, public rooftop space in the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Manhattan rents are still stupid high, but they’re slightly less stupid high, with the median rent falling from $3,395 to… $3,300. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Unlike Manhattan rents, car rental prices are soaring. (Christina Goldbaum and Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

The 13 best soft serve options in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Some election results have come in:

Jamaal Bowman is the new Democratic candidate for the 16th congressional district, having officially beating incumbent Eliot Engel in the primary. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Democratic Socialists of America–backed Marcela Mitaynes beat State Assemblymember and Assistant Speaker Felix Ortiz in the Democratic primary. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Jessica González-Rojas has won the Democratic primary for the 34th Assembly District seat over incumbent Michael DenDekker conceding today. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights Post)

The election’s results are still in the process of being certified, but that hasn’t stopped the lawsuits over voting from starting. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Nowadays’ 16,000 square foot backyard is now open in Ridgewood. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

An idiot was arrested twice in one day for defacing Black Lives Matter murals. (Julie Coleman for NY1)

Jimmy Webb’s ‘I Need More’ closes today. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Photos: Inside the last days at Jimmy Webb’s I Need More. (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

A scaffold collapsed at a non-union site in Murray Hill, killing worker Mario Salas Vittorio, and injuring three others. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Photo: Yeah, this guy is walking across the street wearing shoes and nothing else, but is he wearing a mask? (@Newyorkist)

Ayame Stamoulis was arrested and charged with the murder of a man found wrapped in a plastic bag on the roof of McDonald’s in the South Bronx. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

5,000 people get to see Mets games this season, kind of. There are 5,000 cardboard cutouts of people at Citi Field. At least one of them is a dog! (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

A look at the Central Park Barber Herman James’s Sundays. (Emily Palmer for NY Times)

The Jay Street subway will have a positive unintended consequence: Getting the NYPD to stop parking on the street illegally. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Where to eat outside in Red Hook. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Gowanus’ Public Records, Prospect Lefferts Gardens’ & Sons, the Flatiron District’s Undercote, Times Square’s 701 West and Greenwich Village’s Bar Pisellino are on Esquire’s 27 best bars in America. (Esquire)

The Briefly for July 16, 2020 – The “She Doesn’t Even Go Here” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor signed the chokehold ban, congestion pricing is dead, the Times asks if the NYPD has given up on investigating shootings, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 77˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

In 2019, the state budget anticipated a January 2021 start for congestion pricing in the city, which would have helped to the tune of $15 billion over five years to help the MTA. What’s the status? Without federal approval, the project is dead. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A look at the six finalists in the Brooklyn Bridge redesign competition, organized by the city and the Van Alen Institute. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A prayer match from Brooklyn to City Hall, led by Black clergy leaders and sold as a community-focused Christian unity event, turned ugly when it was co-opted by the NYPD and Blue Lives Matter protesters. An NYPD union promoted the event as one of their own, perhaps to make it appear like they have community support. An avoidable situation without the NYPD’s meddling. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NY Times, welcome to the resistance. Today the Times questions if the piles of unsolved shootings across the city, is the NYPD pulling back from its job? The NYPD’s Dermot Shea has a ton of excuses, but ultimately the NYPD made arrests in only 23% of the 634 shootings this year through July 12. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The NYPD confirmed the dismembered body found in a LES apartment was tech CEO Fahim Saleh. Saleh was the CEO of Gokada, a motorbike-hailing app in Nigeria. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A body was found wrapped in plastic underneath a UHaul blanket on the roof of a McDonald’s in The Bronx on Wednesday morning. The cause of death has yet to be determined. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A deeper look at the federal government’s roadblocks on NYC’s congestion pricing. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

West Indian American Day Carnival is going digital for 2020. (Yannise Jean for The Brooklyn Reader)

When baseball officially returns, gets ready for a very odd extra-inning rule that puts a runner on second base automatically. Listen guys, if you don’t want to play past nine innings, just say so. You don’t have to make up new rules. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The High Line opens to the public today, but with a reservation system and from noon to 8 pm. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $9.4 multi-story Upper East Side penthouse with four terraces, a 24-hour doorman, a built-in library and whatever a “supplemental laundry room” is. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will reopen five days a week starting on August 29. (Peter Libbey for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has a new website to promote and sell PPE manufactured at the Navy Yard. They’ll also be selling them in PPE vending machines at West Elms and Wegmans. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Seems that most people are still paying rent. According to the National Multifamily Housing Council, 88% of tenants are paying rent, down only a percent or two from the same time last year. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

“The only reason you’re out here is because you feel guilty.” City Councilmember Stephen Levin’s meeting with his constituents in McCarren Park to explain his “yes” vote on the city’s budget probably didn’t go as he planned. (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

The Empire Center for Public Policy plans to take the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to court for allegedly violating the Freedom of Information Act for failure hand over payroll records of MTA cops. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Robert Bolden is still in the hospital for long-term heart damage after being shot with a stun gun by the NYPD and for multiple fractures to his humerus bone from last weekend’s clash between a pro-police rally and Black Lives Matter protesters in Bay Ridge. Bolden’s lawyer is calling for criminal charges against the NYPD officers who caused the damage to him. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

This is the last story I’m going to link to about the people who ran Ample Hills into the ground for a while. It’s an interview with the owners, which took place before the sale of the business after declaring bankruptcy, which was unrelated to the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s enough with these two, who are already talking about starting another ice cream-related business. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: 9-year-old chess champion Tanitoluwa Adewumi isn’t letting the pandemic get in his way of trying to become a chess grand master. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Mayor de Blasio signed the chokehold ban and police accountability bills into city law on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD forced a homeless man off the subway, cuffed him, beat him, and sent him to the hospital. Cy Vance chose to charge him with assault. One day later and after watching the video of the homeless man getting pepper-sprayed, punched, and pummeled by NYPD officers, District Attorney Vance decided to drop the assault charges but is continuing to pursue charges of resisting arrest. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

AOC is the latest person to pressure Governor Cuomo to back a tax on New York’s billionaires. (Jeffrey C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Feature: Brooklynite Siobhan O’Loughlin’s art requires an interactive audience in an intimate setting. Her show Broken Bone Bathtub literally asks audience members to wash her while she sits in a tub. Under a shelter-in-place order, O’Loughlin pivoted to the heavy task of creating intimate environments with audiences regardless of distance. Her latest show, “My Heart Will Go Zoom,” tells the honest, engaging story of quarantine romance. (Hoa P Nguyen for Brooklyn Based)

9 rooftops your can visit today. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!