The Briefly for September 16, 2019 – The “JUUL Miss Me When I’m Gone” Edition

Late-night subway disruptions, the MTA’s ballooning budget, the weekly restaurant closures, Rudy Giuliani’s divorce gets messy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

It’s a short list of subways that will be disrupted late nights this week. Even still, if you’re on the 1, 4, A, E, or R trains, you’ll want to check before you make late-night plans. (Subway Weekender)

It’s possible that the Cuomo-Byford feud may be softening. (Politico)

The city will allow bicyclists to ride past the United Nations during the General Assembly, a departure from previous years. It still won’t be easy. Each bicyclist will have to pass a security checkpoint before proceeding. (Streetsblog)

The governor announced the state will ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes with an emergency ruling. (Politico)

The city will be showing off some early design concepts for the Sunnyside Yards. (Sunnyside Post)

The city is calling its renovation of Fort Greene “routine work” to avoid doing a full environmental review. The Sierra Club is leading a lawsuit against the city for the classification and lack of review. (Patch)

The photos of Battery Park as a wheat field are weird. In 1982 there were two acres of wheat planted as an art installation which also yielded a thousand pounds of wheat. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA was headed for a $392 million budget gap in 2020, but that was before the MTA decided to hire 500 additional police officers. (Politico)

The MTA’s on-time performance rate hit 84% last month from 68% the previous August. The future of the MTA is all in the 2020-2024 capital plan, which hasn’t been made public and will be voted on on October 1. (6sqft)

Where to have a last-minute fancy dinner. (The Infatuation)

“I’m sad to know that the hero of 9/11 has become a liar.” Is anyone surprised that Rudy Giuliani’s divorce is a huge mess? (Splinter)

Luxury apartments are changing the city’s skyline, but they aren’t selling. 25% of the luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. (Gothamist)

Speaking of luxury apartments, there will be 700 new luxury apartments will be built in Dumbo as part of a development on a three-acre parking lot. (NY Times)

A class-action lawsuit over a lack of wine coolers in luxury apartments in Hudson Square. (Patch)

Here are this week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. No one hit over 100 points, but the Eataly kiosks in Flatiron had the highest violation score. (Patch)

The mayor is fighting back against allegations that his sudden embrace of restricting hotel development in the city has something to do with a presidential endorsement from the Hotel Trades Council union. (Politico)

Would you love to brunch at the new TWA Hotel but don’t want to travel like a peasant to get there? Well, now you can take a private helicopter to brunch from lower Manhattan. (Time Out)

After a few weeks of confusion, the state has clarified that landlords and brokers are both going to be held to the new $20 application fee limit. Before the ruling, agents were charging high fees because a landlord wasn’t allowed to. (Gothamist)

A man with a sword was arrested at the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (amNY)

It’s the kind of trash talk you need to see to believe. (@edenbrower)

Whoops, an NYPD school safety officer was arrested for possession of three pounds of marijuana. (SI Live)

Are you the person who bought a $10 million lotto ticket in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Sometimes trash is old food and mile-long CVS receipts. Sometimes it’s 20,000 slides of fashion shows from the 1980s. (Jezebel)

22 places for a stellar meal in Soho. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)