The Briefly for March 15, 2019 – The “Manhattan’s Getting More Junk in the Trunk” Edition

The death of a supposed mob boss, Lou Reed’s archive is now available at the NYPL, a guide to the Hudson Yards, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The NYPD’s hate crime unit is investigating the anti-Semitic graffiti on an ad featuring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (NBC New York)

The MTA will stop L train construction at 7pm following months of constructing dragging on for nearby residents until 11pm six days a week. (Town & Village)

Is Bushwick ready for a Chipotle with liquor? (Patch)

Lower Manhattan is going to expand by approximately 500 feet in a $10 billion effort to protect the neighborhood from the next superstorm. (Gothamist)

Francesco Cali, the supposed boss of the Gambino crime family, was shot dead in front of his Staten Island home on Wednesday night. No suspect has been identified. (Patch)

Frank Cali’s neighborhood was, as the Times puts it, “a fitting location for an old-fashioned Mafia hit.” (NY Times)

Things are just peachy along the L train, as service to Manhattan was suspended on Thursday morning after debris fell onto the tracks. Also? No L train service between Manhattan and Brooklyn this weekend. (Gothamist)

Watch a visualization of the city’s development from 1609 through today. (Myles Zhang)

30 reliable first date spots in Brooklyn, also 30 places to people-watch first dates. (Eater)

A decomposing body was found in the water near the Brooklyn Army Terminal on Wednesday morning, the man was not identified. (Bklyner)

Okay, is winter over yet? (Patch)

The Department of Health announced five yeshivas who illegally allowed unvaccinated students to attend school and the measles count is now at 158. 137 of those cases are under 18. (Bklyner)

All the restaurant specialty nights worth checking out. (Grubstreet)

A guide to inside Hudson Yards, which officially opens today. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s District Attorney is dipping a toe into the sex work decriminalization debate. He doesn’t support decriminalization but has stated is “rethinking” loitering charges. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Long Island City residents asked for a bike lane along Borden Avenue in January, a cyclist was hit and killed on that road three months later. (Gothamist)

A new bill proposed by City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal would create a searchable database to show empty storefronts that have been vacant for over three months, and owners facing a $1,000 fine for each week they fail to register. (Patch)

Lou Reed’s handwritten poems, sketches, photographs, recordings, and other personal items were acquired by the New York Public Library and will be on display starting today. (amNY)

Part of the celebration of Lou Reed is a limited edition library card sporting his image. (BrooklynVegan)

Everything you need to know about Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. (6sqft)

Where to eat out when you really can’t afford to. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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The Briefly for August 27 ,2018 – Get Ready for the Governors Island Mall and Hotel Complex

The city is looking to rezone Governors Island, the Grand Army Plaza Arch is getting a restoration, the zip code with the highest rent is in Manhattan and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Because nothing is safe from development, the city is looking to rezone Governors Island.

Reminder: The 167th St B/D station closes today for renovation

Quickly, name a park in the city that’s named for a poet (not Shakespeare).

Private garbage hauler Sanitation Salvage’s license has been suspended following two deaths due to dangerous working conditions over a six month timeframe.

Two city buses were sprayed with a noxious substance this week. Are we living in a Batman movie?

The New York Times has discovered Coney Island’s Brooklyn Cyclones. No one tell them about the Staten Island Yankees.

Five Brooklyn bars that are as pretty as their happy hour prices, according to Brokelyn.

Eating an oyster from New York’s waterways isn’t a great idea today, but New York was once the oyster capital of the world.

How to legally party in the city’s parks.

Battery Park has the most expensive rent in any zip code in the United States. 26 of the top 50 zip codes are in Manhattan.

Streetsblog takes a look at three different ways the MTA’s finances are screwed.

The New York Times takes to look at the cozy history of Andrew Cuomo and Donald Trump.

The Grand Army Plaza Arch is getting an $8.9 million restoration, which will include a cleaning, repairs, and updated lighting.

Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez introduced a bill that would prohibit ICE and boarder patrol from wearing uniforms that use the word “police” in order to easily distinguish the difference between local police and federal immigration officers.

City Councilman Mark Levine is urging the city Parks Department to terminate its contracts with businesses owned by President Donald Trump.

14 of Eater critic Robert Sietsema’s favorite West African eateries in NYC.

A cop who has been held up as a model example of NYPD diversity was arrested for allegedly forcibly touching two people — including the wife of a police sergeant. Whoops.

Part of Julie Salazar’s platform for state senate is decriminalizing prostitution, repealing the state’s loitering for prostitution law, and repealing the prostitution exception in New York’s rape shield law, and has the support of current and former sex workers while canvassing. Salzar’s opponent, incumbent Martin Malave Dilan, says he is open to discussions about it.

I live completely rent-free in dream destinations by pet-sitting” is the new “A Week In New York City On $25/Hour And $1k Monthly Allowance.”


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