The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 18, 2019 – The “Please Insert A Floppy Disk to Upgrade the Subways” Edition

The Green Light bill passed, marijuana legalization, e-bikes and e-scooters are still up for grabs, the best restaurants in Chinatown and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The governor is adding 500 law enforcement officers to the subway to fight back against assaults and the MTA’s fear of fare evasion. (amNY)

This week in animals stopping the subways: a turkey stopped the N train in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

The subway is powered by OS/2, IBM’s computer operating system that dates back to the early 90s. (Tedium)

I think we need a full ban on any helicopters going over Manhattan itself.” – Mayor de Blasio. (6sqft)

Staten Island is getting 77 “state-of-the-art” buses. So far the MTA’s overhaul in Staten Island has sped up the buses by 12%. Still short of the mayor’s 25% goal, but if it works in Staten Island, it has hopes in the rest of the city. (Curbed)

The ‘Renewable Rikers Act’ was introduced in the city council to transform Rikers into a renewable energy center, sponsored by Astoria’s Councilmember Costa Constanides and Helen Rosenthal. (Give Me Astoria)

It’s the summertime, so it’s time to look for some new cocktails. A look across the city’s bars at drinks like The Donkey Kong, A Song of Ice and Fire, The Canary, and any other drinks ith great names. (amNY)

The summer mosquito spraying is beginning. (Patch)

Are these sandwiches worth hour-long waits? Through July 13th, you’ve got your chance at Otto. (Gothamist)

I think I’m sort of a laid back, cool dude in a loose mood.” Governor Andrew “cool dude, loose mood” Cuomo. (@JimmyVielkind)

RIP Gloria Vanderbilt, fashion designer, socialite, and Anderson Cooper’s mother. (CNN)

Video: The story of the rise and fall of Anna Delvy, the socialite grifter. (Cheddar)

The Green Light bill, the bill that will provide undocumented immigrants the opportunity to have drivers licenses, is now the Green Light law. (NY Times)

Battery Park is built on a landfill, but in the late 70s and early years of the 80s, Battery Park was a beach. If you’ve never seen photos of Battery Park before Battery Park, it’s a wild sight. (NY Times)

Paul Manafort was scheduled to be moved to Rikers Island, Attorney General Bill Barr’s top deputy intervened. He’s likely to be held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in lower Manhattan. (NY Times)

Ten secrets of Queens’ Fort Totten Park. (Untapped Cities)

Watch Dominique Ansel make his most popular item: the DKA. (Viewing NYC)

Brooklyn, are you ready for another special election next week? (The Brooklyn Reader)

Albany appears to be working at its hardest as the end of the legislative session is approaching. Legalizing electric bikes and scooters are on the docket. There are some peculiar exceptions in the bill, like no company can rent scooters in Manhattan and scooters would be banned from the Hudson River Greenway, but it’s a start. (Streetsblog)

The state’s legislative session is ending on Wednesday and lawmakers are described as “frantic” to pass marijuana legalization before their summer break. (NY Times)

Gem Spa on Second Ave and St Marks isn’t going anywhere. Despite “Everything Must Go!” signs, the owners have reassured the community that they are “very much open for business” and simply had to clear the sidewalk. (EV Grieve)

The ASPCA is scheduled to open three low-cost vet clinics in the city for people who can’t otherwise afford the care their companions may need. (amNY)

The city’s animal shelters were supposed to go “no kill” by 2015. So what happened? (Gothamist)

23 LGBT landmarks of the East Village and Noho. (6sqft)

There will be no subway disruptions during World Pride weekend on the 29th and 30th. (Gothamist)

“Avoid walking across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset” and other tips from the New York Times on how to survive WorldPride weekend as one of the expected four million revelers. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in Chinatown. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 15, 2019 – The “Manhattan’s Getting More Junk in the Trunk” Edition

The death of a supposed mob boss, Lou Reed’s archive is now available at the NYPL, a guide to the Hudson Yards, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The NYPD’s hate crime unit is investigating the anti-Semitic graffiti on an ad featuring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (NBC New York)

The MTA will stop L train construction at 7pm following months of constructing dragging on for nearby residents until 11pm six days a week. (Town & Village)

Is Bushwick ready for a Chipotle with liquor? (Patch)

Lower Manhattan is going to expand by approximately 500 feet in a $10 billion effort to protect the neighborhood from the next superstorm. (Gothamist)

Francesco Cali, the supposed boss of the Gambino crime family, was shot dead in front of his Staten Island home on Wednesday night. No suspect has been identified. (Patch)

Frank Cali’s neighborhood was, as the Times puts it, “a fitting location for an old-fashioned Mafia hit.” (NY Times)

Things are just peachy along the L train, as service to Manhattan was suspended on Thursday morning after debris fell onto the tracks. Also? No L train service between Manhattan and Brooklyn this weekend. (Gothamist)

Watch a visualization of the city’s development from 1609 through today. (Myles Zhang)

30 reliable first date spots in Brooklyn, also 30 places to people-watch first dates. (Eater)

A decomposing body was found in the water near the Brooklyn Army Terminal on Wednesday morning, the man was not identified. (Bklyner)

Okay, is winter over yet? (Patch)

The Department of Health announced five yeshivas who illegally allowed unvaccinated students to attend school and the measles count is now at 158. 137 of those cases are under 18. (Bklyner)

All the restaurant specialty nights worth checking out. (Grubstreet)

A guide to inside Hudson Yards, which officially opens today. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s District Attorney is dipping a toe into the sex work decriminalization debate. He doesn’t support decriminalization but has stated is “rethinking” loitering charges. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Long Island City residents asked for a bike lane along Borden Avenue in January, a cyclist was hit and killed on that road three months later. (Gothamist)

A new bill proposed by City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal would create a searchable database to show empty storefronts that have been vacant for over three months, and owners facing a $1,000 fine for each week they fail to register. (Patch)

Lou Reed’s handwritten poems, sketches, photographs, recordings, and other personal items were acquired by the New York Public Library and will be on display starting today. (amNY)

Part of the celebration of Lou Reed is a limited edition library card sporting his image. (BrooklynVegan)

Everything you need to know about Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. (6sqft)

Where to eat out when you really can’t afford to. (The Infatuation)

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