The Briefly for July 29, 2020 – The “11% of NYPD Officers Have a Record of Misconduct” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning is dead, Revel is on pause, where to eat in Chinatown, Trash Panda Park, Cuomo fights for control over the city, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Clear throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo is expanding his oversight on the city and its finances via three nominations to the seven-member Financial Control Board, which has oversight over the city’s budget. He’s nominated allies to the board and stated he’s looking to scrutinize the city’s fiscal outlook. Other board members are State Comptroller Tom Napoli, Mayor de Blasio, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Governor Cuomo. (Zack Fink for NY1)

While Governor Cuomo is fighting to hold more control over the city, the State Legislature is fighting to take control away from Governor Cuomo, seeking to limit his power over the state’s budget. The Budget Equality Act, which hasn’t been voted on yet, would allow the legislature to add to the budget in addition to its powers right now, which only allow a reduction in spending. A change would require an amendment to the state’s constitution, so this will become a multi-year fight. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: It has a 1,000 bottle wine room, a 1,200 square-foot terrace, an outdoor kitchen, and 6,400 square feet of space. All yours in Tribeca for the low, low price of $17.5 million. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

After two recent deaths, Revel has indefinitely suspended its service and review its safety measures in the city. The mayor called this “an unacceptable state of affairs.” Just imagine what he could actually get accomplished if the mayor stepped in when a system within the city is obviously broken and causing pain and suffering on a wide-spread basis. It should be noted that Revel has operated since 2018 and these two are the first reported deaths. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

1 out of ever 9 NYPD officers has a confirmed record of misconduct.3,796 out of 36,000 have at least one substantiated complaint against them. Most have received no penalty at all. (Christopher Robbins, George Joseph, Jake Offenhartz, Zach Gottehrer-Cohen, and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Unsatisfied that Portland get all the country’s attention for people being grabbed off the street, the NYPD has decided to get in on the action. NYPD officers grabbed 18-year-old Nikki Stone tossing her into an unmarked Kia minivan. Reports indicate she’s since been released. (Allyson Chiu for The Washington Post)

91 percent of public drinking tickets in the last six months went to Black and Latinx New Yorkers. Is anyone surprised? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“With the Senate back in Washington working on another COVID-19 relief package, we at the MTA are fending off a fiscal tsunami. We’re simply trying to survive the rest of this year, and the next one, with our finances mostly intact. But to do that, we need help and we need it now – in the form of another $4 billion in federal aid to get through 2020.”
-Patrick Foye, Chairman and CEO of the MTA, MTA fiscal tsunami requires federal relief for Bronx Times

A little look at NYC’s history using augmented reality. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The history of animals in Central Park from the goat-drawn carriages to Hattie the snowplow elephant to the camels that helped plow the soil for planting. (Sam Neubauer for I Love The Upper West Side)

The city has suspended its brown bin composting program, but the LES Ecology Center is rolling out a phased reopening of food scrap drop-off sites with a few sites accepting scraps. (Tequila Minsky for amNewYork Metro)

The Yankees’ second game in two days was postponed while MLB tries to come to grips with the outbreak in the Marlins’ locker room. (Joe Pantorno for amNewyork Metro)

Governor Cuomo made the offer that New York state hosts the games for any MLB team that wants to play them, boasting the state’s infection rate is currently below 1%. For players, Cuomo would carve out a new exception from his out of state quarantine rules. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, DC, and Puerto Rico were all added to New York’s quarantine list, bringing the total up to 34 states. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

I nominate that Riverside Park be renamed Trash Panda Park after racoons have taken over. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

The Industry City rezoning is dead. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca is the deciding vote when it comes to the proposal and he has come out in strong opposition to it. Menchaca has laid out multiple conditions for his support and he says they were not met. ITs only hope is that Speaker Corey Johnson step in to rally the council against Menchaca, which seems unlikely. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

A moment of cute! A duck built a nest on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The staff is keeping an eye on it and the new family will be moved to Central Park when they’re ready to leave. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

“I don’t think this is the type of job we should just ‘wing it,’ and that’s the sense I’ve been getting sometimes.” The city’s contact tracing program is not off to a great start. (Sharon Offerman for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio says that unless the federal government’s new stimulus package includes more state aid, the city will be forced to layoff up to 22,000 workers. These are the jobs that he said could be saved with if the city can successfully renegotiate worker contracts with unions by October 1. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Thinking about heading to Long Island to go to the beach to avoid the city’s beaches? Good luck with those sharks. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

12 more bars have had their liquor licenses suspended by the State Liquor Authority, mostly in Jackson Heights, bringing the total to 29. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

For almost $1,000 you can enjoy a three-night stay in the Wythe Hotel, complete with a movie or TV show screening in the hotel’s private screening room. They’ll even throw in popcorn for free. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A federal judge granted a preliminary injunction instructing New York State to begin unemployment payments to Uber and Lyft drivers immediately and promptly. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Chintatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 10, 2020 – The “Everyone Can Hear Your Phone Conversation” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city paints another Black Lives Matter mural, the zoos are reopening, Manhattanhenge, all public events are canceled until September 30, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 78˚
Heavy rain and humid throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

This weekend is your last chance to see Manhattanhenge this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Video: Looking to turn your apartment into an indoor garden oasis? Here are some tips and tricks to turn your black thumb green. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Predictably, Mayor de Blasio doesn’t like Attorney General James’ plan to move control of the NYPD under a commission. This might be the biggest endorsement to move forward with this plan. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

If you event needs a city-issued permit between now and September 30, it’s canceled. All events in the city are canceled, with exceptions for some street fairs, events in parks, and events smaller than one block. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

It used to be that NYC’s public spaces were where you could go to take a private phone call. The city’s indifference towards any individual person was an asset if you were in a restaurant or at work and needed to have a conversation, Now? Our public space has become more valuable than ever and in the comparative spareness of the streets, you can’t find the same level of anonymity. Now, when you’re on the phone while waiting outside a Trader Joe’s, not only can everyone hear you, they’ll make signs to inform you that your conversations aren’t private. (Judith Newman for NY Times)

Centre Street in Lower Manhattan has been co-named Black Lives Matter Boulevard. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The city painted a Black Lives Matter mural in front of Trump Tower, which is a nice gesture, but I worry that the city’s government has lost sight of their goals in pursuit of public art projects. (Michael Gold and Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Many New York City Council members of color say that in their communities people aren’t screaming for police defunding or abolition. One wonders, did they just close their windows each time a #BlackLivesMatter protest marched by their house? It is true that this year’s #BlackLivesMatter protests have engaged far more white people than they did when Eric Garner was killed, but in response to those protests the Council voted through a budget that added 1,300 new police officers. What Black or Latino Council member can honestly say their communities were screaming “Build new jails!“ when they approved billions to do just that in 2019? (None.)
-Andrew J. Padilla, Member of Community Board 11, for Gotham Gazette. Deconstructing the #DefundNYPD Clash with City Council Members of Color

Remember when the NYPD said that the spike in shootings was caused by the city’s bail reforms? Well, the data is out and the NYPD lied, again. Only one person released was re-arrested for a shooting. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The MTA is getting back to work in their offices, check out their guide to getting back to work. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Here’s what to expect when the Museum of the City of New York reopens later this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Congrats to the winners of the Time Out Time In Awards. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Restaurant Daniel, a Michelin-starred restaurant is jumping into outdoor dining, making it one of two starred restaurants still operating. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Photos: It’s been five years since the reopening of the High Bridge, which absolutely gorgeous, connects Manhattan to the Bronx, and is the city’s oldest surviving bridge. (Duane Bailey-Castro for Untapped New York)

In admiration of the city’s restaurants that have gotten creative with their outdoor dining setups. (Pete Wells and Karsten Moran for NY Times)

Photos: Michael Che has been hosting regular, outdoor, socially-distanced, pop-up comedy shows in Long Island City outside the Plaxall Gallery, working with The Creek and the Cave. The next show is July 15. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Lots of questions about masks, answered. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

No matter what the mayor says publicly, the Department of Education says it is too early for a plan to be in place for opening schools in the fall. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Take a look at the six finalists announced for the Brooklyn Bridge walkway redesign competition. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo, Prospect Park Zoo, Queens Zoo, and the New York Aquarium will reopen to members on July 20 and will open to the public on July 24. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Paulie Gee’s is offering takeout pies for the first time since 2014. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The Citi logo has been removed from One Court Square. (John Bolger for LIC Post)

After being temporarily released from prison, Michael Cohen is back behind bars and in custody to serve the rest of his sentence. (Maggie Haberman, William K. Rashbaum and Nicole Hong for NY Times)

No matter what safety precautions they’re taking, these rooftop pool parties in Long Island City don’t look safe. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Yes, some beaches are open, but some remain closed because the city has a shortage of lifeguards. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

How to always get your security deposit back. (Localize.City)

The Briefly for July 6, 2020 – The “Another Sign of the Apocalypse” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase three starts today, where to eat hot dogs, Dekalb Market goes above ground, The NYPD’s SpotShotter is put to the test, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 88˚
Rain in the evening.

Today starts phase three of the city’s reopening. Here’s what you can and can’t do under phase three. First and foremost, don’t stop wearing your damn masks. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Everyone’s got a friend outside the city that’s been talking about moving here on and off. Here’s a link you can send them instead of answering every question they have. How to know if you’re ready fo move to NYC. (Localize.City)

You’d think business interruption insurance would cover a moment like the Covid-19 pandemic, where businesses were… interrupted. You’d be giving the insurance industry too much credit, because they’ve been rejecting claims because businesses haven’t paid for “pandemic insurance.” (Peter Senzamici for The City)

Sound familiar? That’s because insurers were turning down business interruption insurance claims by the thousands after Hurricane Sandy, blaming specific damage on a flood at a Con Ed substation on E. 14th St. (Reuven Blau for Daily News in 2013)

There’s something killing the fish in the Hudson River. While officials say it’s nothing to be alarmed about, it’s hard to not see this as another sign of the apocalypse. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Ailing parents, dying family members, and economic insecurity, and all while trying to graduate high school. (Rebecca Klein for HuffPost)

Video: A look at the history of the “Freedom” tunnel that runs under Riverside Park and how it became the canvas for Chris “Freedom” Pape’s art and a homeless community. (Vice)

In the last month, there have been 95 lawsuits against the Archdiocese of New York with dozens more on the way. When Covid-19 put a pause on all court cases except “essential matters,” it paused all the court cases against the church, prompting the state’s legislature to extend the window for filing cases from January 2021 until August. The governor hasn’t signed the legislation yet, prompting the sudden flood. (Virginia Breen for The City)

The price of renting a one-bedroom apartment in the city dropped 2% and two-bedroom dropped 0.3% in June and rents are 5% down from last year, according to a new report from Zumper. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

In 2018, the Gowanus Canal’s 4th St basin was supposedly cleaned of “Black Mayo,” aka coal tar, by the EPA as a pilot program for the entire waterway. Work on cleaning the entire canal was scheduled to start later this year, using the same techniques. This week, unfortunately, the black mayo returned. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Dog owners are turning to CBD dog treats amid the endless stream of fireworks leading up to July 4. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1, congrats on the new job Kathleen)

The pandemic has brought a classic NYC staple back: rooftop culture. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

Dekalb Market, the underground food hall underneath City Point in Downtown Brooklyn is reopening, but not underground. It will be taking over a portion of Gold Street and Willoughby Square Park as a reimagined Dekalb “Open-Air” Market. (Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

Rafael Espinal couldn’t have picked a worse time to abandon his post as the City Councilmember for Brooklyn’s 37th District if he tried, essentially robbing his former constituents of their voice through the Covid-19 pandemic, protests, and city budget/defund the NYPD debates. A special election was canceled by Governor Cuomo and Bushwick, East New York, and Cypress Hills won’t have representation on the City Council until Janaury. (Nigel Roberts for The Brooklyn Reader)

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream is introducing their summer flavors this week. How does Caramelized Banana Praline sound? (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The union representing 30,000 faculty and staff at CUNY is suing, alleging CUNY violated the terms of its federal bailout by laying off hundreds of adjunct faculty members, and are demanding that they be rehired. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Tips from a hospital stint on protecting yourself from Covid-19. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

What’s the purpose of legal observers if the NYPD keep arresting them? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

It’s been half a year since the mayor boasted to the press about the NYPD and Department of Homeless Services’ command center. A look at the change coming now that the NYPD are being kicked out. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

A memorial was held for Pop Smoke on Friday night outside his parents’ house in Canarsie the night of his album “Shoot for the Stars, Aim for the Moon.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re headed to the city’s beaches, there’s nothing that says you can’t combine the city’s new hobby of birdwatching with your beach-going. It’s piping plover nesting season, so keep an eye out for the endangered (and super cute) bird! (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo instituted a mandatory 14-day quarantine if you’re traveling to New York from 16 different states. How is it being enforced? 🤷‍♂️ (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Highlights from NBC’s recap of a week of “surprise” fireworks displays from Macy’s, including an unexplained shot of a building in South Korea for some reason? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

The rats have been quiet, but with restaurants opening, expect that to change. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

Visitors are now able to go to the September 11th Memorial for the first time since March. The museum is still closed. (NY1)

The Strand is opening its Upper West Side location this month on Columbus Ave between 81st and 82nd St, the former home of Book Culture. (Sara Lebwohl for I Love The Upper West Side)

A rundown of the fatal five shootings in the city Sunday. (Todd Maisel for amNewyork Metro)

SpotShotter, the system the NYPD uses to detect gunshots, is under a real test with all the fireworks around the city. The system is, pardon the pun, shoddy at best, and its implementation has resulted in the targeting of Black and brown communities. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

RIP Nick Cordero, Tony-nominated Broadway performer, who passed away due to Covid-19. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The de Blasio administration is giving up on the idea of reworking the Brooklyn Bridge promenade, leaving the pedestrian and cyclist nightmare for the city’s next mayor. Here are Scott Stringer, Corey Johnson, and Eric Adams’ takes on the future of the bridge. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More people are riding the MTA’s buses than subways for the first time since volume numbers have been kept. (Christina Goldblum and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

A look at the history of Firemen’s Garden on E 8th St, where the NYFD’s Martin Celic lost his life in 1977. (Ephemeral New York)

A guide to the real-life NYC locations from Hamilton. (Untapped New York)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut and Miki Sudo, this year’s hot dog eating champions who both set new records and are $10,000 richer for it. (ESPN)

Where to eat hot dogs this summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!