The Briefly for December 12, 2019 – The “New Subway Signals Have Been Foiled by Snow” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: LIC gets a Trader Joe’s, a plan to punish bad drivers in the NYPD, the Javits center construction is set to be mostly complete by the spring, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 35˚
Clear throughout the day.

With four Republican state senators not seeking re-election in 2020, the path is open for the state’s Democrats to form a supermajority. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Is there room in NYC for this Frankenstein’s monster of wafer-thin pizza? We accepted Detroit-style, we’d even begrudgingly allow Chicago-style to come in to the city, we we’re hot about Rhode Island-style, but this? Has pizza science finally gone too far? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There are calls for Mayor de Blasio to cancel SantaCon. While SantaCon being an event sponsored by the mayor’s office, there is a petition you can sign. (EV Grieve)

Columbia University made a promise 14 years ago to create a new public school in exchange for a 49-year rent-free lease on a piece of land. Imagine the surprise when Columbia presented a plan to build a 400-foot-tall residential tower on that land. Columbia has been slowly expanding its footprint and the neighborhood is justifiably worried. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

People move to NYC every day, so every day it’s useful to have a link that answers the question “what’s a bodega?” (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

The 7 train’s new signal communication was foiled on Wednesday by… some snow and slush. Yup. The MTA spent $800 million on new signals and there’s a “known phenomenon” that’s been known about since March. When a transponder malfunctions due to snow or slush, the train essentially becomes “lost” to the MTA’s computers and its speed is reduced from 50 mph to 25 mph. Very reassuring. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

New York City, get ready to be REMEd. Of course REME is the new Racially and Ethnically Motivated Extremism unit of the NYPD targeting far-right and extremist hate groups like The Proud Boys or Atomwaffen Division. This comes in response to the shootings in New Jersey. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Turns out, those no-doors, dangle-your-feet-over-NYC-for-maximally-impressive-content- helicopter experiences may be pretty unsafe — by design. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Anti-violence programs across Coney Island are getting $850,000 in city funding to address an uptick in gun violence in the community, starting with gaps in social services. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A remote starting feature on a Lexus caused the death of 21-year-old Michael Kosanovich last week on 148th St in South Jamaica. Kosanovich was crushed between the Lexus and another car when the Lexus rolled forward after being started. Pedestrians were able to push the car off of him, but the car slipped and pinned him between the cars for a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Former President Clinton visited Bed-Stuy’s Cornerstone Baptist Church to check out the energy-efficient upgrades the church was able to install thanks to a commitment from the Clinton Global Initiative University. (Raymond Hagans for The Brooklyn Reader)

The latest episode of the What’s The [DATA] Point? podcast takes a look at the $28.8 billion cumulative four-year budget gap for New York between 2020 and 2023. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

From the team behind the excellent pizza and wine restaurant Ops comes Leo, a new pizza place in Williamsburg split between a cafe/slice shop and a restaurant. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Harvey Weinstein and more than 30 actresses and former employees accusing him of sexual harassment and rape reached a tentative $25 million settlement that would not require Weinstein to pay a single dime out of his own pocket. The money would come from the $47 million settlement closing down the Weinstein Company. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best and worst architecture of 2019. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

A two-year-old boy was caught between a moving 2 train and the platform at Fulton Street during rush hour on Wednesday. He died at the hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The Dry aged Red Hook Tavern burger at Red Hook Tavern, the gruyère fritters at Crown Shy, the Sicilian slice and regular slice at F & F Pizzeria, and the rest of Pete Wells’s top 10 dishes of 2019. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Long Island City is getting a Trader Joe’s. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

The Department of Transportation has a plan to address the insanity on the roads surrounding Essex Place, but it’s gonna take some time. Not months, but years, and by then congestion pricing will be in place. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A combination of miscommunication and faulty construction lead to the slow response to 80 homes’ basements being flooded with raw sewage on Thanksgiving weekend. (Max Parrott for amNewYork)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (Martha Schwindener for NY Times)

The construction at the Javits center is on-time, on-budget, and expected to be “substantially complete” by the spring. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The cleanup of the Newtown Creek has hit some murky waters. The EPA decided on a plan that reduces the combined sewer overflow pollution by 61% rather than an option that would eliminate it completely. Combined sewer overflow basically boils down to the neighborhoods toilets flushing directly into the creek when the sewer system is overloaded. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Interested in the city’s combined sewer overflows? You might enjoy the @combinedsewer Twitter account. It tweets when the city’s sewer system can’t handle a combination of sewage and rain and the overflow is released into the city’s waterways. (@combinedsewer)

The de Blasio administration is getting moving on actually punishing NYPD officers with parking placard for being unable to follow the law while behind the wheel of their own cars. Starting next year, NYPD officers and employees will lose their city-issued parking placard if they get too many moving violation tickets. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Whoops! A mixup meant that a dozen city classrooms didn’t receive the emergency lead-removal that were supposed to before the school year started. (Christoper Werth for Gothamist)

A calculator to help you decide if you should be renting or buying in NYC. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

The best sports bars in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 6, 2019 – The “Where Have All The Duane Reades Gone” Edition

Election results, the ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans, ICE continues to make courthouse arrests, the best bear, never enough food halls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

In a new effort by the MTA and law enforcement to crack down on fare evasion, New York City reportedly opened a $500 million decoy subway station this week to catch turnstile jumpers. (The Onion)

Something is wrong when even Duane Reade is reducing its footprint in the city. (Gothamist)

The 2019 New York City 40 Under 40 Rising Stars. (City and State)

Only 1.14% of the registered voters in the city turned out to vote early this election. Come on, people! Let’s pick it up next time around. (amNewYork)

Jumaane Williams was re-elected as the city’s public advocate with 74.13% of the vote. (Patch)

All five ballot referendums were emphatically answered by voters as “YES!” Ranked-choice voting was approved by 72.94%. Civilian Complaint Review Board reform was approved by 77.05%. Ethics and governance approved with 77.05%. Establishing a rainy-day find was approved by 70.51%. and ULURP changes were approved by 75.83%. (amNewYork)

Melinda Katz is Queens’ new District Attorney. (QNS.com)

Central Park will be adding signage to acknowledge that in 1857 the city kicked the mostly African American inhabitants of Seneca Village off their land in order to create the park. (Curbed)

David’s Briskey House in Bed-Stuy is a legendary Jewish deli run by a Yemeni, proving that food belongs to no one. (Atlas Obscura)

The NYC filming locations for Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman. (Untapped New York)

Alanis Morisette will be celebrating the opening of the ‘Jagged Little Pill’ Broadway musical with an acoustic performance of the album at the Apollo Theater. (Brooklyn Vegan)

There will be a wall in the Gowanus Canal, and National Grid is going to pay for it. It’s true, as a part of the Superfund cleanup, National Grid will build a wall to prevent liquid tar from re-contaminating the canal on the old Fulton Manufactured Gas Plant. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: A feature on Macon Hardware in Bed-Stuy, and Clara Hayes, the 92-year-old unofficial mayor of the block and proprietor, who runs the place. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re purchasing health insurance from the marketplace, you’ve got until December 15 to enroll for coverage for January 1. (amNewYork)

What to do in the Bronx that’s not baseball, the zoo or the Botanical Garden. (6sqft)

Don’t say Alec Baldwin punched you if Alec Baldwin didn’t actually punch you. (Gothamist)

Your reward for voting is this series of adorable videos of Sonya the brown bear acting like a little puppy when seeing her former caretaker. (Gothamist)

Are there enough food halls in Midtown? Never! Here come two more. (6sqft)

A list of demands for Dermot Shea, the city’s new police commissioner. (Streetsblog)

When Mayor de Blasio announced Dermot Shea was to be the city’s next police commissioner, he passed over Benjamin Tucker, the second-highest-ranking overall and the top black police official. This is the third time that the mayor passed over Tucker for the position, instead, he picked Benjamin Bratton, James O’Neill, and now Dermot Shea. (NY Times)

If crime declines, should the number of cops follow it? (Gothamist)

ICE has continued to arrest immigrants at courthouses in New York. The Immigrant Defense Project has counted 112 incidents and sightings and that agents are ignoring the state’s rule that prevents federal agents from making arrests in courthouses without a warrant. (amNewYork)

The Dreamland Roller Disco has landed in a new Brooklyn location. The latest incarnation is at City Point in Downtown Brooklyn. (Time Out)

The ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for October 28, 2019 – The “NYC’s Ten Most Affordable Neighborhoods” Edition

The late-night subway disruptions, Wegmans’ opening day, the subway bandit is back, the JMZ elevated track is falling apart, top-notch Brazilian and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are pretty rough, hitting the 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, A, D, E, J, and L trains. (Subway Weekender)

Reports from the first day of early voting. (Politico)

Here’s your info on early voting locations and this year’s ballot questions.

Keith Haring’s ‘Crack is Wack’ mural is back. (6sqft)

The ten most affordable neighborhoods in NYC. (Curbed)

Today is the day when the City Council will vote on disciplining Andy King for violating the anti-harassment policy, using city funds to plan a retreat timed to his daughter’s vacation, and firing staff members he thought were cooperating with the investigation into his activities. (NY Times)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Curbed)

Time to pay your overdue library fees to the Brooklyn Public Library, they’re nearly a quarter billion dollars behind on their funding. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York is the third-worst rat-infested city in the nation according to Orkin. (Patch)

Here’s something different. A piece of an elevated subway track smashed through a car and it wasn’t the 7 train. This time around it was the J/M/Z near Myrtle Ave and Broadway. (Gothamist)

Just in case you thought the “Watchtower Sign Becomes A Welcome Sign” story was over, you’re wrong. Whoever takes over the lease can replace the sign to say whatever they want. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to go when you don’t want to make a big deal about your anniversary. (The Infatuation)

The one-star reviews are pouring in for the Downtime Bar, which allowed Harvey Weinstein through its doors and kicked out the women who confronted him instead of Weinstein. (Yelp)

The Department of Environmental Conservation gave the go-ahead to turn 18 acres of wetlands in Staten Island to a BJ’s. (Gothamist)

The latest city food trend is Cantonese rice noodle rolls. (Eater)

The subway brake bandit Isaiah Thompson is back, with his latest crime being pushing a woman down onto the subway platform. He was arrested shortly afterward. (Gothamist)

If your Halloween BINGO card had “black children being portrayed hanging with nooses in a window in Clinton Hill,” it’s time to see if you have BINGO. (NY Times)

One day we will have to reckon with the traffic apocalypse that Amazon’s one-day delivery will rain down upon us. (NY Times)

Sunday’s rain did not deter the Wegmaniacs from showing up in droves. (NY Times)

Where to go for top-notch Brazilian food in the city. (Eater)