The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 29, 2019 – The “Here Comes Another Disease We Have to Worry About” Edition

We have begun the era of the L Train Slowdown, there’s a struggle for control of Governor’s Island, Pete Davidson moves in with his mom, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the late night subway diversions you can expect this week. (Subway Changes)

Rockefeller Center is turning into a sculpture park for Frieze New York. Tell that to your friend that wants to drag you up to Storm King. (Untapped Cities)

Are the NYPD’s gang raids about justice or vengeance? A new report from CUNY Law Professor Babe Howell shows most of the people caught in gang raids in the Bronx were not accused of violence. Many of the arrested’s offenses were already resolved or dismissed at the state level. (Gothamist)

Great to hear that we have another horrid disease to worry about. Chagas disease, the “kissing bug,” which is usually never found North of South Carolina. Climate change? What climate change? (Patch)

The state’s budget is at the heart of the constant back-and-forth between the state’s legislature and the governor. Queens Assemblymember Brian Barnwell is looking to change that with a proposed constitutional amendment that will wrestle some of the control away from the governor. (Gothamist)

“What do those hawks that fly around the city eat?” Well this one ate a damn pigeon in broad daylight while standing on top of a car. (Viewing NYC)

The city abandoned plans to bring 200 dockless bikes to Coney Island. Locals were worried that allowing bikes to be stashed anywhere would be chaos, even for a neighborhood nicknamed ‘Sodom by the Sea.’ (Brooklyn Paper)

How “protected” could a bike lane be if the only protection is some paint? (Streetsblog)

A look at the nine different bills that could change how rent works in New York state. (amNY)

This week’s high score violation points among the nine restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is 99. (Patch)

The 2019 Astoria outdoor dining guide. Make a note for when you find yourself in Astoria this summer with no idea where to eat. (We Heart Astoria)

BABY LEMUR! (Wildlife Conservation Society)

The Lit. Bar is open, and the Bronx finally has a bookstore. (Curbed)

How much would you be willing to pay for a used MTA garbage can? Bet it’s not $375! (Gothamist)

RIP Michael Fesco, whose gay clubs were trendsetters in Manhattan and Fire Island. (NY Times)

The man who allegedly threw a cup on urine on two MTA workers has been arrested. Still super gross. (NBC New York)

New York Archdiocese named 115 priests and five deacons who were accused of sexually abusing a child. (NY Times)

The Daily Meal’s 101 best pizzas in the nation include 29 NYC pizzas. Not #1, which makes the whole list suspect. (Patch)

How New York is this beer? It’s literally made from bagels. (6sqft)

Ever move back in with your parents after a bad breakup? Pete Davidson bought a $1.3 million house with his mom on Staten Island. (The Real Deal)

It would be more surprising if the L Train Slowdown happened flawlessly. The problems with the slowdown started 30 minutes before the slowdown did. Before the trains were expected to arrive, the first train took 40 minutes. Eventually, the MTA hid their shame by taking their countdown clocks offline. But really, it the L train service any worse than what the MTAs been shoveling our way for years? (Gothamist)

It wasn’t a total disaster of a weekend, but let’s not get our hopes up too high. (amNY)

There’s a block in Jamaica where it appears the raccoons have taken over. Welcome to Trash Panda City. (Patch)

A look at the history of 143 East Houston, from church to fight club to Sunshine Cinema to wrecking ball. (Ephemeral New York)

Of New York City’s 10,000 bodegas, 4-6,000 of them are owned by Yemeni-Americans. In 2017, they closed their shows to protest President Trump’s travel ban. Now they’re taking a stand against the New York Post. (NY Times)

There’s a power struggle over who can control the fate of Governor’s Island as former Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen, Mayor de Blasio’s point person for his real estate initiatives, seemed to have pushed out Michael Samuelian, the President and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island, in a political power play. (Politico)

If you’re registered to vote and live in the city, the city’s Board of Elections has posted your name, address, and political party affiliation online. (WNYC)

Sick of tapas? Where to eat when you’re sick of being told to order 2-3 small plates each. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for December 10, 2018 – The “Aftermath of SantaCon” Edition

The subways are getting faster (no seriously), the best dishes in NYC, unvaccinated children are banned from Brooklyn schools, the rent is too dan high, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

No week is complete without scheduled subway changes and outages. (Subway Changes)

Unvaccinated children are banned from all schools in parts of Brooklyn, public or private, until a measles outbreak has been contained. This is regardless of religious or medical exceptions. Patient zero was an orthodox family that took one of their children to Israel and brought the virus back to Brooklyn. There have been 39 confirmed cases in Brooklyn Yeshivas. (U.S. World and News Report)

The subway is going to get faster. (NY Times)

We’ve seen the worst, now here are Robert Sietsema’s 15 best dishes of 2018. (Eater)

If you’re a collector of doomed NYC landmarks, here’s an auction for you. Pieces of the never-was Staten Island wheel are up for sale. (NY Post)

Moishe’s Bake Shop has cried wolf a few times in the past, so it’s hard to say if this is the true end of the near 50-year-old bakery. (Bowery Boogie)

The NYPD officer accused in Eric Garners illegal chokehold death, Daniel Panteleo, is set to have a disciplinary trialthe NYCHA may break itself up into five different agencies. Will they be N, Y, C, H, and A? (The Real Deal)

Ever get so mad you wanted to punch a city bus? You’re not the only one. (Gothamist)

This trash panda would have gotten away with this jewel heist if it wasn’t for the pesky NYPD. (NY Post)

Have we lost sight of what congestion pricing is about on a fundamental level? (Curbed)

If you’re looking to treat yo self to some wine, Amy Poehler’s wine shop in Park Slope is now open. (Eater)

“I like to get drunk and look at Santas and listen to Christmas music” (Gothamist)

How could you hate SantaCon? Easy. (@fuctupmike)

William Hung, the SantaCon of singing, came out of hiding this year. (Blast)

#SaltBae coming soon” sounds more like a threat than an announcement. (Eater)

Barry Diller and Diane von Furstenberg’s quarter billion dollar park on Pier 55 is taking shape. (NY Times)

A state new law will require public, charter, and private schools to report allegations of sex abuse. Amazingly, this wasn’t the law prior to last week. (NY Post)

Handcuffing a woman giving birth is illegal in New York state, but according to a new lawsuit it didn’t stop the NYPD from doing exactly that. (amNY)

If you’re planning on relying on CitiBikes to get you out of Bushwick during the L train shutdown, don’t. a href=”https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2018/12/07/citi-bike-adding-just-five-bushwick-stations-ahead-of-the-l-train-shutdown/”>Only five stations are being added in Bushwick, which is below the 28 station per square mile standard. (Streetsblog)

A rent hike claims another business. This time it’s the 15-year-old Flatiron Lounge, whose rent is set to rise from $22,000 to $30,000 per month. (Eater)

The first CB2 meeting about the Amazon headquarters went about as smooth as you might expect. CB2 has a seat at the negotiating table, but the attendees want “no negotiations, no concessions.” (LIC Post)

Where’s the mayor? Good question. He’s spent 20% of his second term out of town. (NY Post)

A woman broke her spine in an alleged subway attack by a homophobe. The NYPD is still searching for the man and there is a video available. (Gothamist)

Congratulations and happy 12th anniversary to Queens Crap.

What started as an argument over a woman sitting on the floor of a food stamp office ended with the NYPD ripping her one-year-old daughter from her hands and an arrest. (NY Times)

Add the NYPD’s Sergeants Benevolent Association President Ed Mullins to the people criticizing the Robert F. Kennedy mass bailout program and not the bail system itself. (NY Post)

The city’s best beer bars. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.