The Briefly for May 14, 2020 – The “Your Reservation for The L Train is in 45 Minutes” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 miles of new open streets, the NYPD take aim at Dr Oxiris Barbot, the possible end of the Staten Island Yankees, a brunch delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 58˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain overnight.

I haven’t been tested this whole time.” -Mayor de Blasio (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city is adding 12 additional miles of open streets today/Thursday. Some protected bike lanes that have been long-planned were also announced for opening throughout the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The MTA is looking into “everything” when it comes to crowd control and reducing packed subway cars once the city starts reopening, including reserving space on subways and buses. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The chaos at Elmhurst hospital exposes the city’s lack of a cohesive healthcare system and shows that all we have are a series of hospitals that are ill-equipped to work as a team. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

The police union is calling for the head of Dr. Oxiris Barbot after she denied an NYPD request for 500,000 surgical masks during the height of the pandemic. Her response was that she “didn’t give two rats’ asses about your cops.” Okay, maybe that’s not the best response, but the NYPD’s total headcount is 55,000, why do they need 500,000 masks during a PPE shortage? (NY1)

It must be fun to be NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea because he seems to exist in a reality that the rest of us don’t inhabit. According to Shea, the problem with the NYPD’s selective and racially biased enforcement isn’t the NYPD, the problem is the people the NYPD are enforcing the rules on. No one doubts that being an NYPD officer is one of the toughest possible jobs in the city, but to argue that when a cop with a violent history beats the shit out of an NYCHA groundskeeper with no criminal history, it’s the groundskeeper’s fault? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It was only a few months ago that I linked to a story about Brian Quinn, aka Q from “Impractical Jokers” on TruTV reviving the Rubsam and Horrmann name for brewing company in Staten Island. Covid-19, like with most things, pumped the brakes on his places. Now their unused beer is being used to create hand santizer, working with Kings County Distillery in Brooklyn. (Roger Clark for NY1)

State Senator Julia Salazar earned Bernie Sanders’s endorsement in her re-election campaign, along with financial support from his followers. State Senator Mike Gianaris also earned Sanders’s support for his beating back of Amazon in Queens. (Andrew Karpan for Bushwick Daily)

82 kids are being treated for pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome. Fourteen states and five European countries are investigating the syndrome. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The move by Major League Baseball to downsize minor league teams is still moving forward, and the Staten Island Yankees are still on the chopping block. Game attendance was at its lowest last season and its games are the third-lowest attended games in the league. This could be the last season for the team if the season ever gets started. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

There’s a commissioned new mural at Atlantic Terminal by Brooklyn artist Jason Naylor which adds a splash of bright color, titled “Hope,” to the city. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo added a sign language interpreter to his daily press conferences after being sued by Disability Rights New York for not including one. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Crews at Green-Wood Cemetery have been working seven days a week with shifts that can be longer than 17 hours to keep up with the demand for cremation and burials. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

In a sign of good news, healthcare workers now have a lower rate of infection than the general population, which points at being careful and taking precautions actually working. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Are we ready for in-person shopping to look very different? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

David Chang is closing Momofuku Nishi for good. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The City Council passed a package of legislation to help small businesses on Wednesday that aims to protect commercial tenants from harassment by their landlords and restrict the fees that third-party apps such as Grubhub and Uber Eats can charge businesses during states of emergency. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

The New York Times has discovered something new during the pandemic: the outside. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

The city is supposed to be stepping up to help New York’s homeless when the subways close at 1 am. NY1 followed the trains to the end of the tracks to find a city that was not equipped to help the people that need it the most. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Plan your weekend, here’s a brunch delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Karen for today’s featured photo of a new way to get car-free streets in the city.

The Briefly for April 29, 2020 – The “Cherry Blossom Drone Footage Will Relax You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The MTA attack Mayor de Blasio over the city’s homeless, large crowds violate social distancing at a rabbi’s funeral, the beer delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Unemployed, A Brooklyn Bartender’s Lament. (Hope Morawa for New York Cliché)

The best bike rides in Brooklyn according to Jacqueline VanDusen, who has biked them all. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

If you were trying to successfully reopen the state, would you think to invite James Dolan or Jeff Wilpon to the panel, the geniuses who have given us the modern Knicks and the Mets? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A drones eye view of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s cherry blossoms. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

The MTA is changing its policies to be more strict when it comes to the homeless population. It will no longer allow shopping carts in stations and no one will be allowed to spend more than an hour on the platform before they are asked to leave. Clearly whoever wrote these guidelines has never tried to leave Greenpoint at 3 am on a Wednesday night. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The Mayor should get out of his car and into the subways so he can see what is really going on and solve the problem of his own making.” -MTA spokesperson Abbey Collins. The mayor has failed to live up to his own standards and has blown his own self-imposed deadlines to place 2,500 of the city’s homeless population into hotel rooms by April 20. He missed that deadline by 1,500. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Add Nathan’s to the list of companies who returned their federal small-business loans. Nathan’s had received $1.2 million. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

RIP Tina Girouard, a 1970s SoHo art scene pioneer. (Randy Kennedy for NY Times)

New York’s unemployment offices are backlogged and 400,000 New Yorkers are still waiting for their MArch unemployment checks. The state has a 3,000 person staff who have delivered $3.1 billion to about 1.5 million people so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It hasn’t been an easy road, some errors from the unemployment office resulted in personal information, including social security numbers, being mailed to the wrong people. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Rough Trade NYC shut down music sales when the store was shut down. A month later and they’re back to selling music, online only. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Worried that your fluffy buddy may have COVID-19? Here comes the NYC COVID-19 Pet Hotline. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

What’s open? Here are a few maps showing what’s open in a few neighborhoods across the city. (6sqft)

Veniero’s and Veselka in the East Village will be open for delivery starting Friday. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

RIP Dr. Lorna Breen, medical director of the emergency department at New York-Presbyterian Allen Hospital in Manhattan, who died by suicide. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

At the East end of Delancey St there’s an N95 mask vending machine. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Half of NYC knows someone who died from COVID-19, according to a new Siena Research Institute poll. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Nancy Blum, whose beautiful mosaic work adorns the 28th St station n the 6 line is releasing ornate coloring book pages for free. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio’s special councils to help reopen the city are small businesses; larger businesses; public health and healthcare; arts, culture and tourism; labor; nonprofits and social services; faith-based; and education and vocational training. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Apartment Porn: Inside Sister Parish’s $3.5 million Fifth Avenue Maisonette. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Every student in kindergarten lower and middle schools will either meet standards/need improvement system when it comes to grades this year, essentially a more polite pass/fail. If you “need improvement” you’ll be receiving it in summer school. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Squibb Bridge, which connects Brooklyn Bridge Park to the Brooklyn Promenade, will be op en on May 4, after replacing the previous incarnation, which was structurally flawed. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

CityMD Urgent Care is now offering walk-in tests for COVID-19 at all of their locations across New York City. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Photos: The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds flyover. (Photos by Dean Moses)

Not everyone was a fan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is New York City a city full of idiots? The flyover, which was supposed to be in tribute to the region’s medical workers, must have been so spectacular that a whole lot of New Yorkers forgot social distancing guidelines. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Brooklyn parents say underground yeshiva classes are flourishing in Borough Park — but cops closed a 311 grievance about one in just 16 minutes in the middle of the night. (Reuven Blau and Yoav Gonen for The City)

The NYPD had to disperse a crowd attending the funeral of Rabbi Chaim Mertz. The mayor appeared in person to oversee, as multiple funerals in Brooklyn’s Jewish communities have required NYPD intervention in the last two months. I give the mayor a lot of shit on a regular occasion, but attempting to enforce social distancing without being called an anti-Semite in this situation was absolutely impossible. This kind of gathering and what happened with Tuesday’s flyover are both completely preventable, but no one called the NYPD or mayor nazis or compared them to Wilhelm Frick for dispersing crowds after the flyover. (Liam Stack for NY Times)

Photos of the funeral’s crowd size and density are very different from the photos of the flyover crowds. (@ReuvenBlau)

The signs are still pointing to an Andrew Yang mayoral bid in 2021. (Matt Stevens for NY Times)

The beer delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader JoAnn for today’s featured flyover photo!

The Briefly for March 13, 2020 – The “How Does A Strip Club Fight COVID-19?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: COVID-19 in NYC, the secret gardens of the Upper West Side, new restrictions on gatherings, Broadway is closed, there are no more pro sports, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 66˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 35˚ High: 55˚

Video: Four of six candidates for Queens borough president debated at Queens College on March 9. (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

The Palm steakhouses have been owned for 93 years by the family that launched them, but they have sold to the company that owns the Rainforest Cafe in a $45 million deal. (Serena Dai for Eater)

360° Video: From the top of Edge NY’s outdoor deck. (Action Kid)

The Coney Island Polar Bear Plunge raised $60,000, which was distributed to multiple community organizations, including the New York Aquarium, the Alliance for Coney Island, Coney Island USA, the Coney Island History Project, Coney Beach Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers, New York State Marine Education Association, New York City Parks Foundation, the Coney Island YMCA, and Parachute Literary Arts. If you ever wondered “why does anyone do that?,” this is the benefit of having a wild idea on January 1. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The title is 12 buildings that should be brought back, but if you’re looking to explore some of old New York’s masterpieces, here are 12 of them. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Brewery in planning a second location in the East Village on Second Ave between 3rd and 4th. The location should be opening in the fall with a brewery, live music, and a kitchen with “special guest” chefs. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The best restaurants in the West Village, because we’re not all going to be making all of our own meals in perpetuity. (Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Conor McGregor donated $1 million to the first responder Steven Siller Tunnel To Towers Foundation to make good on a 2018 promise. (amNewYork Metro)

If you’ve got plans to binge the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, you might ask yourself, “If I were her friend, where would I live?” and also “Could I afford it?” Here are your answers. (Localize.City)

The secret gardens of the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)


I won’t list things that are closing but assume that everything, everything pro sports and everything Broadway, is canceled or postponed unless you explicitly hear otherwise, with the exception of city schools, the Queens borough president election, and the census. Before going anywhere or doing anything, please call and confirm.

The state’s public emergency health plan has two prongs: reducing the spread and treating the infected. “There is no end date.” (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The mayor’s press conference about the coronavirus outbreak on Thursday afternoon was somber and reassuring at the same time. If you have the endurance to watch over 90 minutes, the video is available. (NBC News)

The Archdiocese of New York announced it was closing all of its elementary schools for at least a week and would reassess the situation on March 20. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Early voting in the Queens borough president’s race starts on Saturday. Is the city ready for its first coronavirus election? (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Subway ridership is unsurprisingly down 18.65% from a year ago as as many people as possible are staying home. (Dana Rubinstein for Politico)

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Late Night with Seth Meyers, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, Last Week Tonight, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah are joining most daytime shows in filming without studio audiences moving forward. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

I got a text from a friend yesterday that the school nurse for their school was out and one of their students was displaying signs of a fever and coughing. He told me his school didn’t have a backup plan aside from sending the student home immediately.

COVID-19 is showing is just how woefully unprepared our school nurse situation is. The city plans on hiring enough nurses to distribute one in each building by today, but these nurses will be contractors with the city and as a result will be unable to access students’ medical records. Not an ideal situation for making medical decisions. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

When people stop showing up to a senior center like the Open Door Senior Center over COVID-19 fears, it doesn’t mean they aren’t in need of a meal. How do you provide a meal to someone staying home in fear? ( Gabriel Sandoval and Claudia Irizarry Aponte with additional reporting by Josefa Velasquez for The City)

If we’re all going to be seeing more of the inside of our apartments more, maybe it’s time to tackle some of those long-standing projects we’ve been thinking about. The story of how Lauren Rothman was unable to change to a different apartment, so she changed her apartment. (Lauren Rothman for Curbed)

The state’s finances are based on economic growth, which means the next fiscal year, which starts on April 1st, is completely screwed by COVID-19, which will have years of ramifications for the state. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Advocates are worried undocumented New Yorkers will be scared to seek medical help for COVID-19 symptoms. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

No matter what you heard early in the day on Thursday, the child who self-reported as having COVID-19 in the Bronx does not have the illness and the school they attended will be open on Friday. The school system may explore a “summer school model,” with a limited shutdown. (Sophia Chang, Jessica Gould, Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

There’s gonna be a lot of beer that goes undrank and a lot of corned beef that goes uneaten on St Patricks Day. (Erika Adams for Eater)

No gathering of more than 500 people can happen in New York and the legal capacity of just about everywhere has been cut in half. In addition, the mayor said that MSG and the Barclays Center should be expected to be closed for months. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Restaurants will have to reduce their capacity by 50% as part of the new preventative measures put in place. The mayor re-iterated while outlining the new policy that this could be a six0month health crisis with a longer economic recovery period. The city is offering no-interest loans, but this crisis is going to be absolutely apocalyptic for the city’s restaurants, which already operate on slim margins. (Serena Dai for Eater)

A longstanding New York trade organization representing restaurants is calling for the state to offer tax breaks and cap food delivery service fees — in addition to a host of other requests, as the industry prepares for drastic economic consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. (Erika Adam for Eater)

Alex Jones, a human backflowing sewer pipe and conspiracy theorist, was selling toothpaste, creams and several other products that claim to treat or prevent and cure COVID-19 on his website. Attorney Letitia James immediately sent him a cease and desist. (Noah Higgins-Dunn for CNBC)

How does a strip club like FlashDancers handle an outbreak like COVID-19? (Tribeca Citizen)