The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

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The Briefly for May 29, 2019 – The “Amazon Comes Crawling Back” Edition

20,000 bees on a street corner, legal weed gains steam (again), 10 hidden bars and restaurants, Manhattanhenge, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is releasing the results of its study of water fountain parks and the results will inspire you to carry a water bottle with you at all times. (QNS)

Tonight kicks off one of four nights of the year to see Manhattanhenge. (Viewing NYC)

They always come crawling back. Amazon is looking for office space in Midtown West. This won’t likely be 25,000 new jobs, but it seems they can’t stay away. (Curbed)

The top 10 secrets of Citi Field. Some people say if you listen hard enough, you can hear a baseball team playing. (Untapped Cities)

Photos from inside the new Essex Market. (Gothamist)

Nothing to see here, just 20,000 bees hanging out on a street corner in Sunnyside. (Sunnyside Post)

If you’re a superfan of the MTV’s first season of The Real World: New York and have about $8 million sitting around, you’re in luck. The loft is for sale. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel’s food hall reopened after a failed health inspection last week. (Eater)

Luna Park housing in Coney Island is losing $500,000 after one of the people in charge was arrested for accepting bribes to help unqualified applicants get apartments. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kudos to Grub Street for leaving out the most obvious possible entries to their list of 10 hidden restaurants and bars. (Grub Street)

The woman who was hit by a falling branch in Washington Square Park last week is doing better and her doctors are optimistic. Her injuries from the falling branch included skull and spine fractures. (Downtown Express)

Measles cases in Brooklyn have spread beyond the Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn and the numbers have hit the double digits. Sunset Park has a high vaccination rate and the outbreak should be contained. The city’s total number is up to 535. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The calls for an end to the religious exemption for vaccines are growing. (Patch)

Community Board 6 attempted to save Red Hook’s Lidgerwood Building which dates back to 1882 with a plea to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but it was demolished last weekend to make way for a UPS facility. (Bklyner)

Video: The next best thing to riding the Wonder Wheel is experiencing it in 4k and 60 frames per second. (ActionKid)

A look at the life of the Lincoln Memorial’s sculptor Daniel Chester French, a resident of Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

RIP the second incarnation of Hank’s Saloon. The owners of Hill Country Barbeque Market are shutting down their food hall and evicting Hank’s in the process. (Gothamist)

Sports betting in New York? The governor says it’s possible. (Politico)

17 waterfront restaurants to enjoy when we’re not being threatened with tornado warnings. (Eater)

Mina Malik joined fellow candidate Tiffany Cabán in announcing that as the Queens District Attorney, she will not prosecute sex workers. (QNS)

Momentum is growing (again) for marijuana legalization, but we’ve heard this song twice this year without results. The bill doesn’t have the governor’s full support. The governor cites a lack of support from the legislature and the legislature cites a lack of support from the governor. (Gothamist)

Following the moves of the workers of the Tenement Museum, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, and the New Museum, BAM workers are seeking to unionize. (Bedford + Bowery)

The personal hip-hop collection of Fab 5 Freddy was purchased by the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, which will ensure that the earliest days of hip-hop have a permanent home as a piece of history. (Atlas Obscura)

Turns out allowing cyclists to follow pedestrian signals and not traffic lights would make the streets safer, according to a new study from the city. (amNY)

Where to drink right now. The Infatuation’s regularly updated list has been, as you might have guessed, updated with Coast and Valley and Jungle Bird. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 7, 2019 – The “Would You Jump in the East River to Save a Dog?” Edition

The #RethinkLinkNYC campaign, the Met Gala, the target on de Blasio’s back, the Kosciuszko Bridge is ahead of schedule, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Frenchette in TriBeCa was awarded the James Beard award for Best New Restaurant. (NY Times)

While the good people of New York City, his friends, and anyone with common sense don’t want Mayor Bill de Blasio to run for president, he is none of those people. Even if he does make the decision, his questionable fund-raising tactics, and the subsequent investigations into them will be the first speed bump on his way to not becoming president. (NY Times)

While the Rethink LinkNYC campaign isn’t throwing bricks at the LinkNYC kiosks, it is educating pedestrians about the three cameras that are always recording and the questionable nature of who can access those images. (EV Grieve)

The trade for the LinkNYC kiosks is supposed to be revenue for the city, right? The 55-inch screens across the 1,800 kiosks will fall $34 million below projections for the first five years of the program. (Gotham Gazette)

High drama in the East River as a local hero jumped off a pier to save a dog who decided to take an unannounced swim. (Gothamist)

Photos from the 2019 Met Gala. (NY Times)

Here’s a rundown of the nine bills advocates are pushing forward in the state legislature that, when packaged together, are termed “universal rent control.” (The Indypendent)

A look at the After Hours Project, a community-based syringe exchange and harm reduction program, a social and mental health services provider, an opioid treatment facility and provides additional services as well. (Bushwick Daily)

The most beautiful places to get married in the city. (Curbed)

The city’s first new marina in fifty years will be in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The ONE˚15 marina will house over 100 boats up to 200 feet in length. (6sqft)

Housing 20,000 bees on the roof of The Shops at Fresh Meadows is, as the original headline explains “best for bees-ness“. (QNS)

Five of the most unusual places in Brooklyn. Make your own jokes. (Untapped Cities)

Add this to your nightmare file: A 22-year-old woman fell from her apartment’s roof on East 25th Street while taking photos of the skyline. She’s alive, partially because she landed in the building’s trash area. (Gothamist)

NIMBYs, they’re everywhere! Park Slopers say the city wants to “pit the working class people of this city against the homeless,” due to plans to partner with a nonprofit shelter to provide 253 apartments for homeless New Yorkers. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look back twenty years ago at Giuliani’s administration “of, for, and by white people.” (Village

The plans for four “neighborhood” jails that will replace Riker’s Island will each be reduced by at least 10% to better integrate the buildings to the neighborhoods that will be housed in. The number of inmates is currently around 7,400 but is expected to drop to 4,000 by 2027. (The City)

Manhattan and Brooklyn are among the fourth and seventh most bike-friendly places in the country, according to PropleForBikes’ second annual city ratings report. (Curbed)

One of the joys of warm weather in the city is discovering how many places use goats to cut their grass. Add Riverside Park to the list, as 24 goats will “work” through August 30 between 119th and 125th Streets. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Patch is on the allergies in the city beat, showing the next week is going to be particularly rough for those of us who feel personally attacked by the city’s flora. (Patch)

There are a lot of stories about how Louis CK is not allowing people to record any of his material without his consent, which is tragically funny on one hand, but on the other hand, do not go to see Louis CK perform comedy. This city is full of hundreds, if not thousands, of comedians. (BrooklynVegan)

Three-year-old Zoey Pereira’s death is being investigated as a homicide. Her father was seen running from a car which burst into flames, which had been chained shut with two gas canisters and a propane tank in the trunk. Her father was taken into custody for questioning. (NY Times)

Add the Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks to the list of things which aren’t coming to Long Island City. The Brooklyn Bridge was chosen as this year’s location. (LIC Post)

Farewell to the original Essex Market, which is officially closed after 79 years. (Bedford + Bowery)

The Kosciuszko Bridge’s second span will open in September, years ahead of schedule. No specific opening date was set. (amNY)

How does a street pretzel compare to an authentic German Bretzel? (Viewing NYC)

The Durst Organization is lobbying the city to add a new NYC Ferry line between Astoria and the Upper East Side. This might have to do with the seven residential towers the organization is opening in Astoria. (Curbed)

14th Street’s The Blind Pig will be closing on May 18 after the landlord imposed a 50% rent hike. The site is currently listed at $300,000/month. (EV Grieve)

From a 1970 bedroom to throwing axes, from secret rooms to Oscar Wilde, 15 unique bars in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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