The Briefly for July 17, 2019 – The “At This Point, Why Not Wait for Christmas?” Edition

CitiBike’s expansion, the best happy hours, the most expensive neighborhood, the government will not bring a case against Daniel Pantaleo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

New York City had a monorail, if only for a moment. Visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair were able to see the grounds in a 4000 foot looped monorail that was disassembled when the fair closed. Support pylons can still be seen in the ground in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. (Untapped Cities)

Who are Jeff Bezos’s new neighbors? Let’s find out. There’s a list at the end of the article if you want to skip down to it. (The Real Deal)

We have a winner, a Christmas tree being thrown out on July 16. (EV Grieve)

48 people were arrested while blocking traffic at 5th Ave and 42nd on Tuesday while protesting President Trump’s continued threat of ICE raids. (amNY)

Just finished anoter re-watch of Seinfeld and looking for a meal? If you want that classic diner experience, Queens is your borough. (QNS)

If you’ve wanted to take an up-close look at one of Tom Fruin’s Kolonihavehus glass mosaic water towers that are dotted around the city, one is on display inside The Shops at Hudson Yards. (Untapped Cities)

ConEd is celebrating turning the power back on in Manhattan with a victory tour of telling the public “sometimes blackouts happen in heatwaves.” Very reassuring. (6sqft)

The federal government will not bring charges for Daniel Pantaleo over the death of Eric Garner. NYPD Commissioner is the arbiter of Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial, which the police administrative judge has not yet rendered a verdict. “The D.O.J. has failed us,” -Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr (NY Times)

The Department of Transportation’s “Safer Cycling” report in 2017 identified eight priority zones with insufficient bike infrastructure and deadly crashes. Since these areas were identified, the number of injuries in the priority zones have risen by 6.5%. (Streetsblog)

The driver of a box truck hit a cyclist in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue. The cyclist was either unconscious or unresponsive before being taken to Methodist hospital. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into why drivers and pedestrians seem to hate bicyclists. (Gothamist)

CitiBike officially unveiled their plans for expansion into the Bronx Ridgewood, Upper Manhattan, and deeper into Brooklyn. It’ll be a while for some neighborhoods with the expansion scheduled through 2023. (6sqft)

We The Commuters is celebrating Bike Week with a list of biking clubs across the city where the intimidation factor is low and the “we won’t leave you behind” factor is high. (Gothamist)

The play-on-words named Dig Inn has decided to change its name to questionable and no longer punny Dig. They argue “Dig has become more than a restaurant,” to which I argue “restaurants have table service.” (@diginn on Medium)

What to do in a power outage. These are practical tips, this isn’t a guide to entertain yourself. (StreetEasy)

Levain Bakery added a “secret” ice cream sandwich menu item, so if you’re looking to impress your friends who aren’t subscribers to The Briefly, this is your moment. (Gothamist)

A list of the dates where the L train is shut down overnights at ten stations throughout Brooklyn in July, August, September, October, and January. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for six weekends of partial to non-service as switches are replaced. (Curbed)

“My mother at Lincoln Towers at 69th and West End has no power also.” The New York Times published their Slack transcripts from the night of the blackout, because why not? (NY Times)

A farewell to Dean & Deluca. (Grub Street)

Giselle Burgess, the founder of the first troop designed for homeless girls in NYC Girl Scout Troop 6000, was elected to the board of directors of The Child Center of NY. (QNS)

As expected, two real estate trade groups have brought a constitutional challenge against the state’s rent reforms. Historically the Supreme Court has uphelf rent regulations. (NY Times)

Tribeca remains #1 in the city when it comes to home prices, with the median sale price in Q2 of 2019 being $4.34 million. The only neighborhood that comes close is Hudson Yards with $3.86 million. (6sqft)

Williamsburg has the more cases of the measles than any other neighborhood, but the list is 9 neighborhoods long and the total measles count rose by 1 in July to 623. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Tips for eating out in NYC with food allergies. (amNY)

The city’s “Nostalgia Ride” which goes from 96th St to Coney Island along the Q line in a 1917 BMT train will happen this Saturday. Be patient, the ride takes about two hours. (amNY)

Waitress will close on Broadway in January of 2020. (NY Times)

How much trash is on our beaches? Well, Parley for Oceans, the Department of Sanitations official non-profit group, with 170 volunteers picked up 1,200 pounds of trash from Rockaway Beach in two hours. (Gothamist)

The top happy hours in 25 neighborhoods. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for July 3, 2019 – The “Pick A Side: Iced Coffee vs Cold Brew” Edition

Everything you need for July 4, the drink of the summer, new school gender inclusion guidelines, lying roaches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the deal with the subways and buses on July 4. (6sqft)

Expect massive crowds and tight security if you’re checking out the fireworks over the east river. (Patch)

Safety tips for pet owners on July 4. (amNY)

Each year’s Fourth of July fireworks display in the city starts in the California desert, in 11 underground bunkers in high-security facilities. (NY Times)

What’s open and what’s closed on July 4. (Patch)

The New York Times is never why when it comes to controversy, and they jumped in head-first with this one. Is cold brew better than iced coffee? (NY Times)

Checking in with Tom’s Restaurant on the Upper West Side 30 years after Seinfeld‘s pilot aired. (Gothamist)

The top 10 secrets of Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

Despite every last inch of Manhattan having been developed, there is still wildlife. With the year half over, coyote sightings in Central Park are at quadruple the level they were for all of 2018. If you encounter one, leave it alone and report it. (I Love the Upper West Side)

While conservatives around the country are mounting challenges to Roe v Wade, New York City has become more accommodating to those seeking an abortion. Charities helping women afford abortions are seeing a higher percentage of those women come from outside the city. The city even set aside a quarter of a million dollars in support for the New York Abortion Access Fund to assist people from outside the city be able to afford an abortion. (Gothamist)

The okapi diorama at the Museum of Natural History is considered to be one of the world’s most impressive taxidermy dioramas. Here’s the story behind the diorama and even the one riddle/practical joke that can be found if you look close enough. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza issued new gender inclusion guidelines to better support the city’s 1.1 million students. The guide touches on sports, name and gender changes, dress codes, and more. While they are still only guidelines, they are being praised by advocacy groups as a good start. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Don’t be alarmed, but we’ve hit “the cockroaches are flying” time of year. (Gothamist)

Right now the city’s homeless shelters turn away people with pets, which becomes a real problem for the 10-25% of people experiencing homelessness who have pets. More than 98% of animals surrendered to the city’s Animal Care Centers in the last six months are due to their owners’ homelessness. Two bills making their way towards the city council could change that. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s restaurants have begun to embrace the latest food trend: chickpeas. (amNY)

Sometimes it’s better not to ask. Like, “What is that black, smelly liquid pouring out of the elevator at Grand Central?” Maybe that’s information we should never know. “Why was it gushing out and why did it smell like sewage?” These are more questions that should not be asked because you probably don’t want to know the answer. (Gothamist)

On any given day you can find multiple photos of NYPD vehicles using the city’s bike lanes like personal parking garages, which makes the mayor’s declaration that the NYPD is going to start taking drivers in the city’s bike lanes laughable. (Streetsblog)

Apologies to our mayor, who had his time in Iowa interrupted to discuss the three bicyclist deaths in the city in the last week. A “crisis,” but not enough of a crisis to deal with it within the confines of the city that he’s supposed to be in charge of. The mayor was short on details, aside from increased NYPD enforcement of pre-existing laws. (Gothamist)

The crackdown is not permanent, but a three-week targeted enforcement. (Streetsblog)

Fact-checking the president’s claims that New York’s taxes are driving people away. (NY Times)

Our president is a serial liar, so no one should be surprised that despite his claims that he’s never had an alcoholic drink that he regularly drank in New York City, according to a new book by Allen Salkin. (Vice)

The first section of a state park honoring the first African-American woman elected to Congress, Shirley Chisholm, is open in Brooklyn. (Curbed)

The city is speckled with the history of the revolutionary war if you know where to look. (amNY)

Remember the city’s styrofoam ban? It’s in effect and the first fines have been issued. (Gothamist)

Central Park’s Belvedere Castle is open after a 15-month renovation. (Time Out)

The drink of the summer: The Gin and Tonic Plus (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for July 2, 2019 – The “One of the Worst Run Big Cities in America!” Edition

The CBD ban is kind-of in effect, the 14th St busway lawsuit gets pushback, the best lunch spots in Midtown East, the Seamless controversy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Start putting your July 4th travel plans together, even if you’re not planning on leaving the city, because subways, streets, buses, and ferries will all be affected by holiday changes. (Curbed)

Congrats to presidential candidate and sometimes-in-NYC mayor Bill de Blasio. New York City is one of the worst run big cities in America! (Patch)

After the Shalimar Diner closed in November, a Facebook group called “Save the Shalimar Diner” wanted to… you know, save the Shalimar Diner. Cue 1986 Met Lenny Dykstra, who is (kind of) saving it by moving the whole thing to Long Island. (Untapped Cities)

Construction debris fell from the 12th story of a nearby apartment building still being finished through the roof of Mission Delores, the popular Park Slope bar, on Sunday, seriously injuring a woman who was in the bar. Mission Delores is closed until further notice and the woman who was struck is breathing with the assistance of a tube at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. (Eater)

8 new outdoor art installations for July. (Untapped Cities)

Dante de Blasio wrote an op-ed in today’s USA Today about “the talk” his father had with him about dealing with the police that was mentioned in last week’s presidential primary debate. The head of the Police Benevolent Associaton called the mayor’s remarks “shameful.” (USA Today)

Eater wanted to know if L&B Spumoni Garden is still good. Turns out it is! (Eater)

The city is nearly doubling its monetary support for the LGBT community with funding for Trans Equity Programs, LGBT community services, and LGBT inclusive curriculums in public schools. (6sqft)

Here’s what you need to know about the Grub Hub/Seamless website buying controversy that erupted last week. Grub Hub has been finding new and creative ways to rip off local restaurants, including registering fake websites in their names and tricking customers. (Grub Street)

Playing ping-pong on the subway. Fun idea or public nuisance? (Gothamist)

The president doesn’t seem to know Letitia James’s name, but he certainly knows he thinks she’s being used by Governor Cuomo against him. (Patch)

The count of people who’ve died in car crashes while riding bicycles is up to 15 in 2019. 29-year-old Devra Freelander was hit and killed by a 70-year-old cement truck driver in Bushwick. (Streetsblog)

The number of dead bicyclists on city streets was 10 for all of 2018, the mayor says Vision Zero, which strives to “use every tool at its disposal to improve the safety of our streets,” will still be viewed as a success this year. (Gothamist)

The opposition to the 14th Street busway has some opposition of its own. An advocacy group supporting the busway slammed the lawsuit that blocked the busway from taking effect on July 1 as classist, citing the average rider of the M14 has an income of $28,455/year and are people of color. (amNY)

Reaching-Out in Bensonhurst is a food pantry that has provided food and social service referrals to people in need for 30 years but due to a shortage of funds has had to turn away hungry families. The shortage is due to stagnant funding. They currently serve 9,800 families and are always open to donations. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you have $13 million, you can own something almost no one in NYC has: your own set of private islands. (NY Times)

The city’s ban on CBD was promised at the beginning of the year for July 1. Now that it’s July, the Department of Health claims that it is cracking down, but they won’t issues fines until October 1. (amNY)

If you’re looking for the city’s biggest asshole, you wouldn’t be wrong to start looking at whoever decided to create this $250 hot dog. (Gothamist)

What does Midtown need? How about an 800-foot tall tower right on top of Macy’s? (NY Times)

The mayor will honor the late Det. Luis Alvarez, who recently died at 53 due to 9/11-related cancer, with a key to the city. (amNY)

A former high school student was awarded nearly $60 million in damages on Monday after a Manhattan jury found the city’s Department of Education and his former teacher liable for an accident that left much of his body scarred from third-degree burns. (NY Times)

A non-NIMBY argument against City Councilmember Brad Lander’s “YIMBY Junk.” (Red Hook Star-Revue)

The days of speeding without consequence in the city is coming to an end. The city is installing 2,000 speed cameras within a quarter mile of schools, which are practically everywhere. Anyone going 10 mph over the posted speed limit will get a $50 ticket. Critics say that turning the entire city into a speed trap won’t save lives, but anyone who gets a $50 ticket in the mail will start driving differently. (NY Times)

Where to get lunch in Midtown East. (The Infatuation)

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