The Briefly for January 30, 2020 – The “So Many Non-Coronavirus Ways to Die” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Krispy Kreme is coming back to NYC, impeachment cakes, the NYPD wrote more moving violation tickets to cyclists than truck drivers in 2019, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 38˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

12 contenders for a NYC subway mascot. (Ben Yakas with illustrations by Matt Lubchansky for Gothamist)

The Lunar New Year Chinese Temple Bazaar in Queens was canceled over coronavirus fears, despite New York having no confirmed cases. (Joseph Goldstein and Jeffrey E. Singer for NY Times)

Worried about Coronavirus? Don’t be. The flu killed 5,000 Americans in the first two weeks of the year. (Buzzfeed)

If you live in NYC, you can request a Department of Transportation bike corral by filling out a form, even for a residential building. (@jeffnovich)

The NYPD issued more moving violations to bicyclists than truck drivers in 2019. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

In reaction to the Clearview AI mess with the NYPD, State Senator Brad Hoylman proposed legislation that would outright ban on biometric technology use by police on a city level, a bill is being pushed that would require the NYPD to disclose every surveillance tool it employs. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city collectively passed a ballot measure to expand the power the Civilian Complaint Review Board has to oversee the NYPD. In response, the NYPD is suing the city to prevent the change from happening. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Harlem neighborhood that Langston Hughes praised in 1944 is still one of the ‘best-kept secrets in New York.’ But it’s not quite as affordable as it once was. (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

According to Mayor Bloomberg, New York City “isn’t trying to be the lowest-priced product in the market.” Now the city is full of empty luxury apartments, because oligarchs don’t have the same kind of money that they used to. (Cory Doctorow for Boing Boing)

Krispy Kreme is coming to Times Square with a 24 hour 45,000-square-foot store and it’s bringing five more NYC locations with it. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

What happened with Fairway in Red Hook? According to their landlord private-equity ruined the store. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

15 places to find vaulted Gustavino tiles in the city. (Shirley Mgozi Nwangwa for Untapped New York)

Should New York public schools teach climate change? Wait, climate change isn’t taught in New York schools? (Scott Enman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Hey, did you buy a lottery ticket and not check it? Two Take 5 tickets were sold and they’re each $29,249 winners. Go check your pockets. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Alamo Drafthouse in lower Manhattan was supposed to open in 2018, then it was supposed to open in 2019, now it’s been postponed until summer of this year. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

It’s been ten years since it was declared a superfund site, but the long-awaited cleanup of the Gowanus Canal officially has a start date, and it’s in September. (Devin Gannon or 6sqft)

The city paid Childrens Community Services half a billion dollars to provide homeless services since 2017, but there’s only one problem. It appears that the nonprofit doesn’t exist. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

Someone’s been spotted stealing the Spotted Pig’s pig. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The website for The Villager, one of the media brands inside the Schnepps empire, has been eaten by amNewYork Metro. The Villager was already the home for The Villager, Chelsea Now, Downtown Express, and Manhattan Express. Consolidate, consolidate, consolidate. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Brooklyn bakery Butter & Scotch sent 53 sheet cakes to Washington with various messages to encourage Republican senators to allow John Bolton to testify int he impeachment trial of Donald Trump. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Dozens of Rise and Resist members grouped themselves at Grand Central during the peak of rush hours, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Monday night, for a vocal demonstration, sparked by the impeachment proceedings on speed and lack of witnesses. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Brooklyn may seem like a liberal’s paradise, but politics within the borough’s Democratic party is becoming less transparent as leaders voted to hold fewer meetings and restrict member-driven resolutions. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The famous hot chocolate from City Bakery is getting a second life with founder Maury Rubin’s The Wonderbon Chocolate Co. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The team behind Brooklyn Bazaar is bringing a new restaurant within McCarren Park inside the restored bathroom building. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The most beautiful interiors in New York City, mapped. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Nothing says “punk rock” like a limited edition pair of Doc Martens with the CBGB logo stamped on them. (BrooklynVegan)

After the Knicks shit the bed (again) on Wednesday night, the entire Garden broke out in a “sell the team” chant aimed at team owner James Dolan. The Knicks are 13-36 and have had a using record 16 if the last 19 seasons. (Dan Bernstein for The Sporting News)

Video: A look at People and Animals Living Safely (PALS), a non-profit that provides a safe space for human and animal victims of domestic abuse. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has big plans for 2020, which include work on making nine subway stations ADA compliant, spending a billion dollars on signal upgrades for the A, C, and E lines, improving the 7 and F tunnels, station improvements along the J and Z lines, and working on extending the Q train to 125th St. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Shaun Donovan, a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama administration, is planning to run for mayor of New York. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The City Council is imagining the future of Rikers Island, with an emphasis on creating renewable energy and a waste water treatment plant is a possibility. (Gloria Palzmino for NY1)

There are 1,400 buildings whose facades have been determined to have major structural problems and are a serious threat to pedestrians, hundreds with no protections for pedestrians. Those buildings have racked up $31 million in unpaid fines from the city. (Matthew Maah for NY Times)

39 holiday happy hour deals in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for December 26, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Don’t Belong on the Beach” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When to throw out your Christmas tree, the secret economy and industry of five cent deposits, Cuomo’s feud with Trump heats up over weddings, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 45˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look back at the City Hall Christmas tree lighting, a bygone NYC tradition. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas has an 88-year history. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Video: The inspiring story of Sydney Mesher, the first Rockette with a visible disability. (The Rockettes)

Videos and Photos: The Saks Fifth Avenue Frozen 2 holiday lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

How long should you keep your Christmas tree up? At least until January 6, because that’s the first day of the Department of Sanitation’s tree disposal. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

Video: No matter what you read on Facebook, don’t leave your old Christmas tree at the beach. (Anginas Gonzalez for NY1)

Tompkins Square Park has some new trees. (EV Grieve)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that would have allowed federal judges, Trump’s judges, to officiate weddings in New York state. I guess federal judges will have to become online ministers if they want to officiate weddings, just like the rest of us. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The fascinating history of 28 Old Fulton St, from old Dutch farmland to Revolutionary War battle site, from the Eagle pressroom to a warehouse for silver, furniture and then electoral ballots, to its latest use as luxury apartments. (Chase DiBenedetto for Bedford + Bowery)

Years ago two toy stores within a few blocks of each other would be at war around the holidays, but in 2019 Stationary and Toy World and West Side Kids in the Upper West Side are joining forces to fight back against online shopping. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: Got $75,000 lying around? You can afford one night at the Mark Hotel. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

With the mayor's potentially illegal "horse trading" collusion with ultra-Orthodox state lawmakers surrounding a Department of Education report about the quality of education at the city's yeshivas, advocates are calling for accountability. The city has made no indication of punishment for the 26 of 28 failing schools, instead requiring "timelines for improvement" by January 15 with no information about if schools fail to meet the deadline. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A state Supreme Court judge has struck down an upcoming New York City rule that would have restricted the amount of time app-based drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft can spend cruising without passengers below 96th Street in Manhattan. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Profiles of five African-American high-profile prisoners from New York City who were convicted of violent crimes that included murder and attempted murder. All committed their first crimes as teenagers. All are now in late middle age, ranging from 48 to 61 and seeking release. A great piece from students at CUNY's Craigs Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. (Stephanie Chukwuma, Trone Dowd, Jeffery Harrell, Brenda León, Hannah Miller, Rosemary Misdary, Rachel Rippetoe, Maria Robins-Somerville, Sean Sanders, and Annie Todd for Gothamist)

8 cultural attractions to visit on NYC’s Museum Mile. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

StreetEasy and Douglas Elliman appear to be ready to lock horns. While the details aren’t exciting, it could portend a coming fracturing of real estate listings. (E. B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

A train delay because of a pencil. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A Bronx police officer is facing accusations of groping a 14-year-old teenager while she was handcuffed in the back of a squad car last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Christmas is gone. No literally, Christmas is literally buried in Green-Wood Cemetery. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

The city doesn’t just get rid of its useless junk, it auctions it off. (Winnie Hu and James Sprankle for NY Times)

What’s the opposite of a Christmas miracle? Ask the 1,000 residents in NYCHA housing in Coney Island who woke up with no heat or hot water on Christmas. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

As of this week, bicyclists can use the walk/won’t walk indicators rather than the lights are use. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The latest in the seemingly never-ending battle of Industry City’s rezoning is that things are looking bleak for Industry City after the city is refusing to provide funds for new schools, housing and tenant programs to benefit the neighborhood. The decision to move forward rests with City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, who has been skeptical of the process since the start. It would be unheard of for the city to commit funds for a private application, Menchaca is justifying the request based on how dramatically the rezoning would change Sunset Park. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Has Midtown South become more pleasant for residents in the last few years? Finally, an answer to the eternal question of “who lives here?” (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

There is an entire underground economy centered around plastic bottle and metal can deposits, where the world turns five cents at a time. It’s all in a legal gray area that the city turns a blind eye towards, but once you have an understanding of how the canner economy works, you can understand why there is opposition to expanding the five cent deposit program. (Andy Newman for NY Times)

After eating at 300 restaurants this year, Scott Lynch picks his 16 best bites of 2019. (Scott Lynch for Eater)

The Briefly for December 18, 2019 – The “AOC vs Cuomo Round 2: The NYPD Subway Surge” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio has another new approach for the city’s homeless population, the hoax that led to an AMBER alert, the most expensive street on the planet, & more

Today – Low: 17˚ High: 37˚
Clear throughout the day.

Search for “de Blasio” “homeless” and “new approach.” Here are some highlights you’ll find:
– Jan 2015: “Shifts Strategy on Homeless Help”
– Dec 2015: “The most comprehensive street homeless outreach effort.”
– Apr 2016: “sweeping homelessness reforms”
– Feb 2017: A “blood and guts” war on homelessness.
– Dec 2017: “playing catch-up on unsheltered homelessness.”
– Mar 2018: an “innovative solution to the crisis.”
– Dec 2019: A new approach addressing street homelessness. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

Cluster sites are temporary apartments for the homeless in privately owned buildings and the mayor announced in 2016 that he would end the practice of using them by 2019. There are still 3,000 units of cluster housing in the city. Many nonprofits that operate cluster sites have hundreds or thousands of open violations, and continue to get business from the city despite it. (Joan Goldberg for Brooklyn Eagle)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was one of the leading voices in the effort that killed Amazon’s HQ2. Can AOC help the fight against Governor Cuomo’s NYPD surge in the subways? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

When the United States misses its targets to reduce climate emissions, New York won’t be on the list of states that caused it to happen. (Aaron Short for Streetsblog)

The best Chinese food on the Upper West Side. (Acrienne Cooper for I Love the Upper West Side)

The scumbag of the week award goes to FDNY lieutenant Christopher Hughes, who was caught stealing from a charity event at a Catholic school fundraiser on Staten Island. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo seeks to redefine conditions under which a person is capable of giving consent, specifically in when someone is drunk. In a steady stream of announcements like a legislative “12 Days of Christmas” the governor has been unveiling one proposal a day leading up to his 2020 State of the State address. (Sarah Midkiff for Refinery29)

Revisiting Le Bernardin, “one of the city’s most thrilling and technically astute restaurants.” (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Everyone got the AMBER alert on Tuesday (unless you’re a monster and turned them off) for Karol Sanchez, who was kidnapped in the Bronx. A few hours later we found out it was a hoax set up by Sanchez as part of a feud with her mother, who she deems to be overprotective. (Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The video for All I Want for Christmas is You has a New York connection, it was filmed in front of the iconic “Bronx Christmas House.” Unfortunately this year the house is dark for the first time in 46 years. (Ed Garcia Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Harvey Weinstein, NYC’s resident goblin, claims his back hurts too much to deal with a lawsuit to recoup a $45 million loan from him. What a tough year this much have been for him. 🙄 (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The LES, Sunset Park, Gowanus and the rest of the six NYC neighborhoods poised for major change in 2020. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The most expensive street not he planet is 57th St, aka Billionaire’s Row. It end one of four Manhattan streets in the top ten. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Mail-order iconic foods, the foie gras debates, bowl restaurants and all the restaurant trends Adam Platt never wants to see again. (Adam Platt for Grub Street)

There is a second legal fight against an apartment complex that would cast a literal shadow over the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. A lawsuit is looking to overturn the City council’s approval and force the developer to do an Environmental Impact Survey. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Falling building debris fatally crushed a 60-year-old woman on West 49th Street and Seventh Avenue in Manhattan on Tuesday morning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA gave a “sneak peek” at a complete redesign of Queens’ bus system on Monday night with an eye towards less redundancy, easier transfers, and more inter borough options. The full book on the redesign will be released in the spring of 2020. (Angelica Acevedo for amNewYork)

New York City has agreed to pay $12.5 million dollars to settle a class action lawsuit by people who were subject to invasive strip searches while visiting loved ones in jail. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The 24-hour NYC diner isn’t dead. Say hello to the new Soho Diner. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Attention NYC Millennials: The suburbs want you! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Here’s how the local centrists in Congress will vote on the impeachment. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A defense lawyer suggested detectives had badgered and yelled at a 13-year-old boy before he admitted participating in the fatal mugging of Tessa Majors. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The NYPD will encrypt their radios in 2020, cutting off press from real time reporting and also essentially killing how the Citizen app, Scanner 911, and Broadcastify get their reports. The move seems to fly in the face of the city’s attempts at making the NYPD more transparent and accountable. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

The hidden fees in no fee apartments. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork)

NYPD arrested a truck driver who they say fatally struck bicyclist Matt Travis in East Harlem last month and left the scene. (Eyewitness News)

Time Out New York’s 20 best dishes of 2019. (Bao Ong for Time Out)